• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Wolves and Trail - Riding on horses

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wolves and Trail - Riding on horses

    The DNR has reintroduced wolves and rattlesnakes in the area that have decimated the deer population. I live in Central Wisconsin. A Wolf has eaten up a neighbor farmer's calf and ate all the barn cats. A forester was chainsawing wood and a wolf came 10 ft to him. A pack of Wolves were seen crossing the bridge at the end of the driveway and I saw a huge timberwolf also, that is bigger than my Newfoundland dog.

    Needless to say, now I am scared to go out trail riding by myself for this and other safety reasons. My husband is going to get me a pistol for Christmas, that I can carry with me on trail rides...but I was wondering if anyone heard of wolves attacking a horse or group of horses....

    I have been trail riding with a friend where we see wolf tracks and bear tracks, but honestly, the 4 wheelers are more dangerous.

  • #2
    Derailing the topic...I'm curious, since you've obviously put some thought into this. All my marksmanship training was done years ago with a .22 rifle, lying or kneeling. What kind of training do people need to deal with a pistol on horseback, and how do you get it? It would really suck to accidentally shoot your horse instead of the threat. It would also really suck to have the horse freak and dump you when you start shooting.

    Comment


    • #3
      nope, never- and ride a bunch out west NW of Yellowstone with wolf tracks for days. I don't worry about them.

      Comment


      • #4
        I usually carry a gun when I'm riding in the back country just in case, but I wouldn't worry too much about wolves, just like I don't worry too much about lions or bears. Yeah, they all might attack you (heck, a Canadian folk singer was just killed by a pack of coyotes, of all things), but like you said irresponsible humans are more trouble. I've never heard of wolves attacking horses or riders.

        Also keep in mind that reports of wolves tend to be highly exaggerated. I'm sure some of them are true, but a lot of them are actually coyotes or feral dogs which have been around forever. People are very afraid of wolves and in areas where they are reintroduced people tend to let fear get in the way of their common sense, at least IME.
        exploring the relationship between horse and human

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by carp View Post
          Derailing the topic...I'm curious, since you've obviously put some thought into this. All my marksmanship training was done years ago with a .22 rifle, lying or kneeling. What kind of training do people need to deal with a pistol on horseback, and how do you get it? It would really suck to accidentally shoot your horse instead of the threat. It would also really suck to have the horse freak and dump you when you start shooting.
          See http://www.sightm1911.com/manual/manual.htm

          We do some Cowboy Mounted Shooting, also.

          Frankly, hitting a target the size of a large dog from a moving horse will not be an easy task. But at the first shot the do will likely "booger."

          Be sure to gun break the horse before trying any mounted firing.

          G.
          Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

          Comment


          • #6
            I've seen wolves while riding near Yellowstone. They run off pretty quick and want nothing to do with people. And they have not been hunted in that area yet. Once they have been shot at a few times, they will be even more elusive.

            By carrying a pistol and firing it, Usually the noise will be more than enough to scare off the average predator. If and when you really felt threatened by a predator that didn't scare. You could shoot. Most pistols won't kill the larger bears, like a grizzly, fast enough to do you much good. Even a shot thru the lungs, the bear could cover 30-40 yards and maul you before it died. Wolves are not near as tough. A well placed bullet will kill. The key word is WELL PLACED. Which is almost impossible to do from the back of a horse. Cowboy Action Shooters are firing at Balloon ( which you can assume is about the size of the kill zone of a wolf) The balloon is usually holding fairly still. Shots are fired from a moving horse at a target 6-10 feet away. You will proably be firing at a wolf, probably both it and your horse will be moving, at distances much greater than 10 feet.

            Bottom line is. any pistol you choose to carry on your person, Will be more of a noise maker than something that inflicts fatal wounds. Unless you are a skill marksman. Buy a pistol that is light enough that you will carry it. Something you are comfortable shooting, Not too powerful that you are afraid to shoot it. I have a 41Mag made out of Titanium. It weighs 22 OZ. So ver lite weight to haul around. But the noise is SOOOOO Loud, it hurts my ears to fire it. I carry it with me, And I'd fire it if threatened. But I rarely practice with it unless I have lots of Hearing protection.

            A Wyoming Wolf. This is about as close as we got and this would be an incredible pistol shot.
            http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p...ndView-051.jpg
            http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p...dview/Wolf.jpg

            Comment


            • #7
              In a windy arena the balloons in a CMSA match move around quite a bit!

              I was watching R. Lee Ermy's new offering, "Lock and Load," on the History Channel a couple of weeks back and he took a stab at hitting a large jug filled with some colored fluid from the back of a cantering horse with a single action revolver. Lee is a good rider and a VERY good shot with a hand gun and he didn't come close in three tries.

              If I were concerned and didn't want to inflict serious damage on an animal I'd use a .45LC blank. At close range this will cause minor injury to a dog. If you want to do a bit more harm then get some rat shot or snake shot rounds. This puts a miniature shotgun in your hands. But it's quite easy to nick your horse if you're not real careful. Using a standard round will likely kill, or very seriously wound, a large canine but is the most difficult one to use accurately.

              CMS is a real hoot and goes a long way towards making a horse "booger resistant."* But taking the time to properly train the horse is vital.

              Frankly, most folks who live in wolf country tell me that it's not the wolves they fear, it's the feral dogs. We've got the latter around here and they are a concern in more than one area.

              G.

              *I hate the term "bombproof" as it implies way too much. Any horse can have a "Monday." Well trained horses have very few, but the number is never zero.
              Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

              Comment


              • #8
                If the wolves are becoming less fearful of humans I would be concerned. Although I have never heard of anyone being attacked on horseback, here in Alaska we have had attacks on humans and dogs on the trails. These are trails near major cities. Some of the wolves have been found to be rabid.
                Wolves are very smart and cunning. They are "silent" stalkers and plan well when they hunt, don't underestimate them.
                If you do plan to carry a firearm for protection make sure you have trained yourself well in the handling of it. If you intend to shoot from horseback you need to practice this with your horse before exposing yourself and your horse to a excited situation.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ah, the wolf hysteria...it near dies does it?

                  Again -- there has NEVER been a documented case of a healthy, non-rabid wolf attacking a person in the lower 48. NEVER. EVER. EVER.

                  Here in Idaho, since the reintroduction of the species, people see wolves behind every tree & bush. Yet according to various expert sources there are only between 1800 - 3000 wolves TOTAL between the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Montana and Washington. That's how many square miles? Actually, because the alternative is cleaning the kitchen, I decided to do alittle research on this.

                  The total square miles for the 4 states listed above is 319,741. So that works out to be a wolf every 110-180 square miles. Yet ask around -- EVERYBODY'S cat, horse, dog, brother & cousin is being eaten by wolves.

                  Exactly how many wolves are in Wisconsin anyway? Did you or your neighbor SEE these wolves eat the farmer's calf or kill the cats? Couldn't be the neighbor's dog or (most likely) coyotes, could it? Since wolves were pretty close to decimated, coyotes have taken over their spot in the food chain and I think they are now present in just about every state in the lower 48.

                  Per my research, Wisconsin has about 680 wolves spread over 65503 square miles -- that's one wolf every 96 sq miles. They aren't exactly standing on every street corner.
                  Last edited by Kyzteke; Nov. 2, 2009, 11:47 AM. Reason: When I discovered there are only 40 moose in Wisconsin...who knew?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CosMonster View Post
                    (heck, a Canadian folk singer was just killed by a pack of coyotes, of all things),
                    Oh -- it wasn't Gordon Lightfoot was it?

                    I loved that guy.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I wouldn't be afraid. I wish they would reintroduce the wolves to Maine, although I live in NH. We rode in very close to Yellowstone twice and didn't see a bear or a wolf on those rides. We only saw the wolves one day and they didn't want to have anything to do with people at all. And I have been there twice once for a week and we were looking hard for animals and then once again for a couple of days.
                      Missouri Fox Trotters-To ride one is to own one

                      Standardbreds, so much more then a harness racing horse.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Kyzteke, no, it was Taylor Mitchell. She was only like 19 years old I believe, just starting her career.
                        exploring the relationship between horse and human

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CosMonster View Post
                          Kyzteke, no, it was Taylor Mitchell. She was only like 19 years old I believe, just starting her career.
                          What happened, exactly?

                          You know, I've read alot about coyotes and their "evolution" lately....apparently the usual coyote unit was just the parents and that year's cubs. But in the last few decades coyotes in some areas have started to "pack up," like wolves.

                          Because of that, they've also started to change the prey they go after...from stuff like mice & rabbits to larger prey. Nature cannot be denied....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I live in NW WI and this is the least of my worries. Yes, I would crap my pants, but I ran into two bears this summer and that made me crap more. Most people in WI are so anti-wolf and I have a hard time believing they are coming within 10 feet of people. Also, I have a hard time believing they are decimating the deer population, since I see lots of deer still dead along the roads or standing alive and well in ditches and fields. CWD is a bigger threat to the deer herds than wolves. It's called an ecosystem-not trying to be sarcastic, but people here forget that deer survived very well for a long time with wolves before people decided to wipe out their prey and manage nature themselves.

                            If you are lucky enough to see one I think your best bet would be to be noisy. As others have said, if you carry a gun to make noise with, and your horrse is used to that, great. Or maybe get some heavy duty bear spray for your peace of mind, but again I would not use that from the back of a horse. You run a huge risk of spraying your horse. As Kyzteke said, there's no documented case of a healthy wolf attacking a human. But I do beleive people have been attacked by deer in rut. Also, don't believe all the tales you hear. Some may be true, many are not. You have more to fear from an antisocial dog.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cloudy18 View Post
                              I live in NW WI and this is the least of my worries. Also, I have a hard time believing they are decimating the deer population, since I see lots of deer still dead along the roads or standing alive and well in ditches and fields.

                              As Kyzteke said, there's no documented case of a healthy wolf attacking a human. But I do beleive people have been attacked by deer in rut. Also, don't believe all the tales you hear. Some may be true, many are not. You have more to fear from an antisocial dog.
                              Actually, I was going to tell the OP she had far more to fear from a moose attack than a wolf attack, since there are plenty of documented cases of moose attacking AND hurting people.

                              But then I did my research (still trying to put off cleaning the kitchen), and found that, as of 2006, Wisconsin only had 40 moose!! Who knew? Around here the place is lousy with moose...in fact one crossed my pasture just last week...those guys have a better trot than my dresssage-bred WB (better suspension for sure) and MAN -- can they JUMP!!

                              As for wolves decimating the deer population -- PLUEEZZE! We get that same load of bull$h*t from the hunters around here. All I can say, is whoever is counting the deer needs to count the number of near misses from suicide deer who are trying to "decimate" my Geo Metro every night as I drive home.

                              Where the hell is a wolf when you need one?

                              People are just hysterical over the "wolf myth," and I find it really interesting that it still lingers.

                              Meanwhile some bonehead 1/2 mile from me had been feeding the coyotes in her back yard "because the babies are SO cute!" Like eating my barn cats aren't enough chow for them...

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Kytzke, apparently you have the same suicidal deer up there that we have here in OK. I just assumed ours were depressed from having been born in a state famous for red neck living. And kudo's to you and your assessment of wolves. You took all of my lines.
                                Babalina, a gun is good but as others have said, unless your horse is "gun proof" you may end up getting dumped which could be dangerous with a loaded weapon. We have a rather healthy population of coyotes and bobcats around here...neither of which seem to be very fearful of humans given the number of times I see them watching me from across the field or edge of the woods near my house, so when I go out with the kids for a walk or a trail ride I bring the dogs. They may not give a dang about me, but a couple of 100lbs+ dogs making a half hearted dash at them, makes them scatter faster than just about anything else I've ever seen. I am partial to my Anatolian Shepherds but I'm sure just about any large breed would do.
                                Katherine
                                Proudly owned by 7 horses, 6 dogs, 3 cats and 1 Turkey
                                www.piattfarms.com

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Predators were eliminated by our ancestors not because they attacked people but rather because they preyed upon livestock upon which the people relied. Foxes, weasels, wolves, etc. all can decimate a farm and, back when the family farm actually supported a family, meant famine for that family.

                                  So my heartburn is not that people are going to be eaten but that these predators will seek the easiest prey they can get. If that's deer then that's fine; it it's calves, kids, and lambs then that's not so fine.

                                  G.
                                  Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Yeah, statistically speaking you do need to worry a lot more about deer than any predator...not even counting traffic accidents, they are responsible for more hospitalizations every year than bears, coyotes, and cougars combined (not sure about wolves, though ). I've known 4 people who had to be hospitalized due to deer attacks; one of them nearly died when a buck gored him pretty badly. Kind of puts things in perspective, doesn't it?

                                    Kyzteke, here's a link to a news article. Sounds like a really freak thing.
                                    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/worl...ands_nati.html
                                    exploring the relationship between horse and human

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by carp View Post
                                      Derailing the topic...I'm curious, since you've obviously put some thought into this. All my marksmanship training was done years ago with a .22 rifle, lying or kneeling. What kind of training do people need to deal with a pistol on horseback, and how do you get it? It would really suck to accidentally shoot your horse instead of the threat. It would also really suck to have the horse freak and dump you when you start shooting.
                                      I would assume that OP would only shoot if she was on foot. My horses were stabled around the gun club for 3.5 yrs, and had one BO whose husband often shot his 45 right near the barn. And of course for the past 4 yrs in the country we've had the hunters blasting away in the woods by the pastures. Still I wouldn't have shot off of my horses, altho I would think I could dismount and blast away without having one bolt.

                                      For good insights into wolves and their social lives, read David Mech's book, "Of Wolves and Men," he studied the wolves on Isle Royale in Michigan, and ready Farley Mowat's wonderful book about Alaskan wolves, "Never Cry Wolf." As with any wild animal, be cautious, but don't "cry wolf" unless you do have some reason to do so. I've always carried a gun, in the cities and in the countryside, as the human predator is far more dangerous that animals, including wolves.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Guilherme View Post
                                        Predators were eliminated by our ancestors not because they attacked people but rather because they preyed upon livestock upon which the people relied. G.
                                        Actually, I think that is only partially true in the case of wolves. Out here in the west, in mountainous country, the wolves were exterminated relentlessly in large part simply "because".

                                        People have a very weird reaction to wolves and always have...it seems they are much more "anti" wolf than bear or cougar, for instance. Of the three the wolf is the least likely to hurt you and, since they hunt in packs, actually the least likely to come after your chickens, cats, etc. Calves -- probably -- but wolves are far easier to scare off than cats & bears.

                                        But, as we've already determined, you have a FAR better chance of your actual person being hurt by a deer or moose than a wolf...

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X