• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse
1 of 2 < >

Event Announcements now available FREE to all registered users

We just reconfigured the Event Announcements forum to be available as a free service for all registered forum users. See the thread stuck at the top of that forum for more information.
2 of 2 < >

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

PSA: If your horse refuses something on the trail, LISTEN TO THEM!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PSA: If your horse refuses something on the trail, LISTEN TO THEM!

    Well, had an uh-oh on the trail today, thanks to me thinking I know better than my horse.

    I moved to a new barn a few months ago, and am still learning the on-site trails. I rode maresie over to the creek, which is just a small trickle with a sand/dirt mix on both sides. Creek crossings, water in general, has NEVER been an issue with this horse. She is one of the bravest horses I've met when it comes to water, and she trucked down towards the water without blinking an eye. Then.. she stopped, and promptly threw it into reverse, and backed up quickly (but not panicky) away from the creek and refused to move.

    Alright, I'm thinking we've never ridden across this creek before, she's just unsure. I dismount, and plan to just handwalk her across because she's always more confident with me on the ground. She VERY RELUCTANTLY walked down to the creek, with me ahead of her a few feet and standing to the side.

    Before I knew it, just as she was about to step the front feet into the water, her back feet slid out from under her so she nearly sat down like a dog. It was that damn mud that is dry and crusty on the top, but wet and slick as snot underneath. I was light enough that I was able to walk on the crust.. she did not. So in order to save herself from faceplanting into the water, she LEAPT forward and landed a good 5 feet on the other side of the creek and up the bank, just barely missing me standing there.

    I can't even imagine what would've happened if I'd stayed in the saddle, it would've been even harder for her to keep her balance when her back legs slipped out from under her. I am an IDIOT for not listening to my horse!

    Luckily, she's alright, and I didn't get trampled (always knew not to stand directly in front of a horse). But damnit, if I'd just listened to her telling me, "I am not crossing here, it is slick and I will fall!", it wouldn't have happened in the first place.

    So, a little PSA.. learn from my mistake folks! If your otherwise steady as a rock trail horse oddly refuses to do something.. they're probably refusing for good reason!
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

  • #2
    My aunt ha the same sort of experience with her "wonder pony!" He was always great on the trail, never spooked or balked. One time he *did not* want to keep walking. She made him, thinking he had gotten pony 'tude. All of a sudden, a bear comes running out of the woods...missing her cub. My aunt and her pony were in between them. They were ok, but she hasn't gone back to that section of trail yet!

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by springdaisy View Post
      My aunt ha the same sort of experience with her "wonder pony!" He was always great on the trail, never spooked or balked. One time he *did not* want to keep walking. She made him, thinking he had gotten pony 'tude. All of a sudden, a bear comes running out of the woods...missing her cub. My aunt and her pony were in between them. They were ok, but she hasn't gone back to that section of trail yet!
      Whoa.. and I think mud was scary.. a BEAR?!?!?
      Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

      Comment


      • #4
        This is sound advice, if you have an honest horse. I've been fortunate to have a few that absolutely, positively, if they said, don't go there (sometimes when bushwhacking through underbrush)- you let them pick their way around or turn back.

        However...some horses do figure out that if they sense 'danger' and rider says well then okay we won't go there...well, they can sense 'danger' more often when it suits them!

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by Beverley View Post
          This is sound advice, if you have an honest horse. I've been fortunate to have a few that absolutely, positively, if they said, don't go there (sometimes when bushwhacking through underbrush)- you let them pick their way around or turn back.

          However...some horses do figure out that if they sense 'danger' and rider says well then okay we won't go there...well, they can sense 'danger' more often when it suits them!
          That's true. My mare, while she is a total brat sometimes, is honest. If she doesn't want to do something, she'll simply act up and give me the big horsey middle finger while saying, "I DONT WANNA, YOU CANT MAKE ME!" So she makes it clear when she's acting up, and when she's clearly unsure about something.

          I just wish I'd picked up on WHAT she was unsure about this time. I just thought she was apprehensive about the creek in general, not that the damn mud would be so slick.
          Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

          Comment


          • #6
            yup scary. i have learned to trust my gelding. the 2 times i did not and pushed him. he sank belly deep into a bog. i was able to hop off and turn him around to solid ground and he got out.

            the other was going down a steep sandy hill. it looked fine to me. so i kept asking him to go down. after a few week it turned slick. and he started to slide fast, he paniced and i was able to hop off before he went head over butt backwards down the hill a few times. he paniced again and tried to go up a steep mud slick and again went over backwards.

            from this day on if he does not want to go and neither do my mares we find another way around.

            Comment


            • #7
              I should have listened to my honest mare when she walked three feet out into a "puddle", then started pawing and didn't want to go further. I gave her a swat, and she said "okay, you asked for it" and we were swimming. It wasn't a big puddle! It was a crazy pond! With who knows what at the bottom. Yikes. I let her leap back out, and she gave a huge groan "You idiot humans!" I had to ride home in wet jeans, which hurt. Serves me right!

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by twofatponies View Post
                I should have listened to my honest mare when she walked three feet out into a "puddle", then started pawing and didn't want to go further. I gave her a swat, and she said "okay, you asked for it" and we were swimming. It wasn't a big puddle! It was a crazy pond! With who knows what at the bottom. Yikes. I let her leap back out, and she gave a huge groan "You idiot humans!" I had to ride home in wet jeans, which hurt. Serves me right!
                Isn't it funny how they somehow figure these things out, while us intelligent humans don't? How the heck did that horse know there was a drop off in the water there? And how did my mare know it was slick under the dry crust??? It's mind-boggling, sometimes!
                Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Worst fall I ever had was trying to force a pony over a jump she didn't want to jump... I didn't see it for the tallish grass, but the ground in front of the coop was rock hard and washboard-rough. I eventually convinced the poor pony to give it a try, but she stumbled on the approach, ended up nearly on her knees (with me on her neck at this point), then HEAVED herself over with a tremendous effort (bouncing me way up in the air), then stumbled again on the landing (catapulting me off her back). I did a flip in the air and landed head-first, back-second, on the hard dirt. Gave me a decent concussion, despite my helmet, but I didn't realize it at the time and ran her over a few more coops back by the barn, just so she wouldn't end sour...

                  Totally my fault, and I really regret it. Pony was telling me "no," my gut was telling me "no," but the person I was with was telling me, "Don't be a wimp! Just do it already!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sublimequine View Post
                    Isn't it funny how they somehow figure these things out, while us intelligent humans don't? How the heck did that horse know there was a drop off in the water there? And how did my mare know it was slick under the dry crust??? It's mind-boggling, sometimes!
                    I never could figure out how my one eyed tb did it- but every now and then, out hunting, he would shy to the left- sure enough, there would be a groundhog hole to the right- but that was the side missing the eye. My theory was that he could somehow detect through hearing, something not good on that side.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by Beverley View Post
                      I never could figure out how my one eyed tb did it- but every now and then, out hunting, he would shy to the left- sure enough, there would be a groundhog hole to the right- but that was the side missing the eye. My theory was that he could somehow detect through hearing, something not good on that side.
                      It's truly amazing, how horses are as observant as they are.
                      Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Close call and you did very good.

                        Years ago the same situation happened to a friend and myself. My gelding would not cross, her mare balked and balked then obeyed her.....sinking up to her chest & hips in the deep mud. Rider bailed, we loosened the girth (the mares lungs were compressing in the clay) and we pulled to no avail. We decided I should go for help before the mare was exhausted and when I was 1/4 mile down the road my friend called me back, the mare had pulled herself out. Way close call.

                        A bit of lore I heard about selecting where to cross at an unknown creek is to cross where there are rocks. The ground will be solid under them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Raising hand...I agree...listen to that honest horse.
                          I have had some close calls too, with bogs, chest deep mud (that just looked like a gravel pile), slippery slopes, sinking sandbars, hidden barb wire. I usually spend the rest of my ride apologizing to my horse over and over.
                          Thanks goodness that an injury has never resulted.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think my QH gelding is too trusting of me to get us from point A to B safely. He seems to think that I have to do all of the thinking for the both of us I guess. Although he is very bright and would never do anything to intentionally hurt either of us, sometimes he needs to be more observant than he usually is all on his own.

                            Like walking along the flat trail w/ good footing at a snail's crawl pace, I shouldn't have to constantly remind him to pick up his damn feet before he trips and both of us go down!! I call it his old man shuffle, however he's done it since I got him at 6. At 23yo you really think he'd know by now.

                            BUT, the only time he ever got himself into a pickle was when I wasn't riding him, but was w/ them. I was riding my big Percheron mare who was just learning about this whole riding thing. It was her first road ride and trail ride down to the river. I had my step-daughter ride my gelding and go along in case she couldn't handle it. There's nothing on the road or trail that my gelding is afraid of, ever. He's a point and shoot type and will go wherever you point him no questions asked. ALWAYS! Again, very trusting no matter who is on his back, unless it's a true beginner than he's more hesitant and cautious.

                            So we made it down to the river and were walking along the sandbars and I was letting my mare check out the water. She ended up loving the water and plodded right along through it. We walked up and down it a few times and then took a little break to snap some pics at the edge of the sandbar. Put the camera away and was getting ready to head to the trails in the timber along side the river when my gelding and step-daughter just sunk. All four legs up to his belly in wet sand right on the edge of the dry sandbar. Mare and I made our way towards them and BAM, we did the same thing. Well CRAP! Neither horses panicked, thank God (trusting souls they are), we both got off, loosened girths and breast collars (mare broke hers when she went down) and let them catch a breather before encouraging them to try and get out. I was a tad panicked as I wasn't quite sure how I was going to get a 17hh, 1800lb mare out of super wet sand. Gelding at the time was a very fit 15.3hh, 1200lb'er, but much more agile than she is.

                            After five minutes of panick and then calmness to not get them worked up, which they weren't, I walked up to my gelding on the dry sand bar, gave him a little tug (step-daughter was having a meltdown and was so afraid she hurt my boy) and reassured him that he could get out of this mess all by himself and by GOD he did. He made one big lunge and managed to get himself out and onto the dry sandbar w/ one good heave and no help from me. I threw the reins to my SD and told her to check his legs and in the meantime, my mare followed along, two big heaves and she was out, as she was farther out then he was. She stood calmly waiting for me to check her out. Not a scratch or anything to be found, tightened the girths, and continued our ride ending on a good note, except for the two teens we met at the end of the bridge on ATV's. Mare did a little jigging, but made it past them w/out incident and the boys were great. I motioned to them to stop before crossing so we could get passed first. They did and turned off their ATV's just as we got there.

                            We were a little wet and sandy, but no worse for wear. They both deserved medals that day!
                            A Merrick N Dream Farm
                            Proud Member of "Someone Special to me serves in the Military" Clique

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              But Somtimes.....

                              These are great stories, good advice, but sometimes such situations can have a wonderful surprise twist.

                              I had a silly OTTB mare who was actually pretty good on trails, brave, strong, never spooky at all. She was so steady and predicatable I always rode bareback all over the country side, up hill and dale, it was always a blast.

                              One summer day we came to a creek - I knew it was very deep in a spot, but the banks were hard packed dirt, footing good even though you had to descend some yards to get into the water. Ol' Ma Horse stopped cold, fought me for a time. It was 90+ degrees out, she was awash in sweat, I figured if she'd just TRY it, she'd find it quite refreshing. Finally I got her into the shallow part, and we made our way to the deeper area. WHOSH! In she fell, up past her belly, just stopped in surprise. After a second or two, she made her way with no prompting by me into deeper and deeper water, eventually was swimming a few yards, and once she got her feet on the bottom again, she didn't want to get out of the water!

                              After that, every time we headed out into that far field, she'd pull straight for the creek, and plunge right into the deep end. And everytime it rained and there were big mud puddles formed in holes in her pasture, she'd stand there forever, pawing and violently splashing mud and water all up under her belly and flanks. What a water baby she turned into!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                And then there's the Swamp Mare

                                Sadie got HERSELF mired up to the belly once when SHE insisted she could cross the Damp Place--I was hollering noooooo and hauling on the reins but She Knew Best.

                                That was one scary incident and thanks very much I Do Not trust Ms Sadie's judgement about footing. About other stuff, yeah, pretty much I do. Unless I'm in a mood for Extreme mud bogging I make sure that I know that the muddy places have a bottom before I'll let her get me anywhere near the swamp again.

                                She crosses water and anything else like a champ and we ford little creeks all the time. Once she bucketed across about a hundred yards of god awful marsh, leaping from tussock to tussock and all the while insisting "We'll Be Fine" when in reality we were in a place where there was no way to be rescued if she guessed wrong--nope, never again.

                                The gelding also has a firm and completely unfounded belief that He Knows Where We Are Becasue He's Been Here Before--he has good sense about mud, but no sense at all about how to get home in one piece. He would walk straight to Texas if I let him have his way. And Texas is a fur piece from here.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Something very similar happened to me. Many years ago I was riding my gelding (we were alone) and since he had never had a problem crossing creeks I was very suprised when he absolutley refused to cross the creek. He kept spinning away from it and I kept spinning him back to face it an urging him to cross the creek. Finally he reared straight up. When his feet finally hit the ground again, THAT was when I finally saw what he saw. I saw a very large cottonmouth snake curled up on the bank on the other side of the creek right where we were trying to cross. That horse had NEVER reared before and has never reared up again. I've owned him for 17 years and that is the ONLY time he has ever reared, but I was too dense to realize that he had a very good reason for refusing to cross that creek. I look at things like that much more carefully now.
                                  "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Wow, some of these stories give me goosebumps!

                                    And yes, as others said they apologized to their horse profusely after, I did as well. And today I am making her a special snack with some extra goodies in it, as my apology-gift.
                                    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      My dad and I were riding on rented horses on trails in Arkansas. Good, willing horses. I trusted them a lot more than I expected to, riding horses I'd never "met" before. But there did come one point where we chose to head down this one trail and the horses refused. We probably could've made them, but they really didn't want to go that way. I don't know what was down there, but we just picked another direction and kept riding (which was why I figure it wasn't something like the horses not wanting to go that way because it was away from the ranch, because we didn't turn for home at that point).
                                      The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
                                      Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by analise View Post
                                        My dad and I were riding on rented horses on trails in Arkansas. Good, willing horses. I trusted them a lot more than I expected to, riding horses I'd never "met" before. But there did come one point where we chose to head down this one trail and the horses refused. We probably could've made them, but they really didn't want to go that way. I don't know what was down there, but we just picked another direction and kept riding (which was why I figure it wasn't something like the horses not wanting to go that way because it was away from the ranch, because we didn't turn for home at that point).
                                        I've ridden those same horses. You are right that they are good, good horses. I've never seen them refuse anything, felt totally safe, trusted them completely! Wonder what was down that trail????

                                        What were the names of the ones you rode?

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X