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let's talk about horse camping

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  • let's talk about horse camping

    i did some research last fall in anticipation of doing a ride which required an overnight but we never went so here i am again worried.
    i think i'm set on doing the high line. so last weekend at the horse expo i had an opportunity to get a closer look at a set up high line. it had one of those knot stoppers on it. it all seems so simple, why the heck am i so nervous?
    so, when i tie my mare how short do i tie her? obviously she has to be able to reach the ground to get her hay. she's not panicky by nature, so i'm not that concerned w/ her getting her foot caught. but what's the standard?
    also, what is the likelihood of me actually getting some sleep the first night? will i be even able to ride or am i going to be exhausted from the whole camping experience? i keep on telling myself that people do it, so can i but...
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique

  • #2
    Go to http://www.american-flex.com/ and check out their section hardware and rigging section in their product line. It's all about picketing with lots of good pics and answers to your questions. Personally, If I wanted to tie my horse for camping I would get a Hi-Tie installed on my trailer and use that. Much easier than getting a picket line set up. If you have several horses than you would do better with a long picket line.

    chicamuxen

    Comment


    • #3
      Depending on how tight you ratchet the highline, the lead snap should be between 2-6" from the ground. If the overhead line has some spring to it, make the lead a bit shorter, or you'll get up in the morning and it will be way too long.

      Easy alternative is to tie to the trailer, if you aren't progressively camping (packing to a new spot each day).

      No, you won't sleep. Every sound will be a lion coming to eat Snookums, or Snookums suffering from a broken leg from tangling himself in the lead, etc. And Snookums will not help, he will snuffle and stomp all night, pick up his water and throw it ten feet, and break off any limb within snapping distance, and be standing in a 3 foot deep hole he carefully shaped for himself when you go out to feed him in the morning....looking innocent.

      But he'll get used to it eventually, and you'll learning to sleep through anything. Don't worry, when the REAL bear visits camp, Snookums will definitely let you know.

      Comment


      • #4
        Having being competing for more then a few years, I uhm...still barely sleep Friday night. Partially because I suffer from pre-competition nerves, partially because I'm always listening to and for my horse. He on the other hand, sleeps like a baby... some how this seems even more unfair! I can't say I've ever seen too many bad things happen with high lin e,s most horses appear to deal quite well with them,I'd suggest trying them out habitually at the barn beforehand, so he knows what's what before the big night
        Originally posted by ExJumper
        Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          LOL!
          that's funny.
          i like the hi-tie but i can't afford it at this time and i also have a v. lite trailer - is that a problem?
          but thanks for the link to the website. a lot of goodies there.
          http://www.eponashoe.com/
          TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique

          Comment


          • #6
            You can still easily tie to your trailer without a 'high tie' and the horse will be fine. I do it all the time and have yet to wake up to an injured horse. If you go with the high line you'll definitely want some tree saver straps - these go around the tree and you tie your high line rope to them. Also, you don't want your horse wandering up and down the line. Position him in the middle so as to be away from tree roots. Not that he might get hurt on them but to protect the roots from his hooves. To prevent pawing all night and to make you a happier camper, teach your horse about hobbles. Nothing is worse than laying awake in the middle of the night hearing the steady thump thump thump of snookums pawing.

            Also, you'll want to use a hay bag that you attach to your high line for him to eat out of. Not a hay net, a hay bag. Putting the hay on the ground is not only unsightly for the next user of the spot (unless you clean up all uneaten hay and take it home with you for disposal as you should, along with any manure) but it limits any waste. However, when you attach it to your line, the line will sag so get yourself one of those truck ratchet tie downs. You can easily crank up your highline and keep it tight with one of these.

            Bring more hay than you think you need and extra grain (if you feed it). You never know when you might get stranded and have to stay an extra day or two or a week.

            Above all, have a good time, bring bug spray, and don't forget the lawn chair for campfire sitting.
            Ride Mustangs - An American Original!

            Comment


            • #7
              Don't panic, everyone gets stressed out and thinks they are doing everything wrong their first ride. Usually there are plenty of people around that will give you advice and keep you on track, don't be ashamed to say your a virgin endurance rider.
              I NEVER get any sleep the night before, and when you get up after lying there for hours stressing you generally think how on earth am I going to get through this?
              But gothedistance is right - lack of sleep tends to mean you are less tense, believe it or not, and by the time your an hour out, you wonder why you worried!
              Don't take sleepy drugs, I tried that once and almost fell off, and still didnt get any sleep.
              But I did find that taking muscle relaxants helped, I find that even on no sleep I tend to feel reasonable rested and calm. Adrenalin kicks in in the morning too, that keeps you going for a fair while - oh and lots of coffee. All in all a nice little cocktail of stimulants and depressents.

              Comment


              • #8
                Practice at home. Seriously. Start out by line tying for an hour (bring a book). Increase the duration. Plan a sleepover campout at the barn with a friend and tie out the horses. Now by the time you are ready for the ride, your horse will be used to the tie-line and you will be more relaxed knowing he 'knows all about' these things.

                Good luck and above all have fun!
                Bridal Sweet 05/28/1983 to 01/23/2008


                Comment


                • #9
                  Okay I don't know if this is an option for anyone, but what I would like to have someday is a portable paddock. Not the electric kind, but the PVC or plastic type. My horse is VERY respectful of fences and is much more comfortable if he can have his hay, grain and rubber water tub on the ground. Plus he can lay down if he wants, something he loves to do every night.

                  Problem is I haven't been able to find any affordable ones. I thought about taking some round pen panels, but I opted for the 12 footers and they are a little long for my truck bed. Also too long to hook on the side of the trailer. I'm still searching, though!
                  *********************
                  No one is good enough to save himself; no one is so bad that God cannot save him.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by patchworkpony:
                    Okay I don't know if this is an option for anyone, but what I would like to have someday is a portable paddock. Not the electric kind, but the PVC or plastic type.
                    I use and electric portable and I love it - we have only used it with 2 of our 3 so far but it worked great and the horses were quite content... I don't expect 3 in there to be a problem (the 3rd just hasn't been on an overnight where we needed our own fence yet)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by patchworkpony:

                      Problem is I haven't been able to find any affordable ones.
                      Easy enough to make your own out of PVC pipe. You can get the pipe, elbows, tees, glue and anything else you would need at your local (?) home center. You could tie the panels together with bungee straps. Quick, light, cheap, and sized to order.

                      Edited to add: Your horse should be able to lay down while tied to a picket line, our's always do.
                      Odi profanum vulgus et aceo

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use portable electric, plus I have portable metal corral rails. The PVC , I wonder, does it crack etc given being stored in a cold climate over winter? I've never seen these used, I live in the great white north, hence the question. Cuz they do sound neat, I complain my metal ones are too heavy to setup and breakdown when I'm alone. PVC would be a lot lighter, I'm thinking?
                        Originally posted by ExJumper
                        Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Portable Corral

                          I too am interested in finding an affordable portable corral. I go on horse camping trips and I never get any sleep because I am constantly listening to my horse in the portable electric fence. Bad habit from previous horse. I would really like to have a sturdy portable corral that I could put her in at night so I could sleep.
                          Missouri Fox Trotters-To ride one is to own one

                          Standardbreds, so much more then a harness racing horse.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rainechyldes
                            I use portable electric, plus I have portable metal corral rails. The PVC , I wonder, does it crack etc given being stored in a cold climate over winter? I've never seen these used, I live in the great white north, hence the question. Cuz they do sound neat, I complain my metal ones are too heavy to setup and breakdown when I'm alone. PVC would be a lot lighter, I'm thinking?
                            We have our whole property fenced with pvc three rail. It has never cracked and, believe me, my pony has tried everything!!
                            *********************
                            No one is good enough to save himself; no one is so bad that God cannot save him.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rainechyldes
                              The PVC , I wonder, does it crack etc given being stored in a cold climate over winter?
                              PVC is very brittle, but also flexible and tough. The pipes come in different wall thicknesses (schedules). Of course, the heaver wall thickness also means more weight. Generally, I would say the pipes are sturdy and flexible enough to survive the cold winters. However, a really sharp blow or a particularly destructive horse could break them. I've broken a few just tossing them off the truck. On the other hand, I've run them over with a truck, and not hurt them.
                              Odi profanum vulgus et aceo

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I built my own portable corral out of PVC pipe. It was beautiful to behold until the first night it was used. My horse clipped the legs off 3 of the panels. When each leg came off I had to get up, remove the panel, reposition the corral and go back to bed. When it appeared I wasn't going to get ANY sleep and would have NO corral left by morning, I tied him to the trailer for the rest of the weekend. He was very happy there. I have since invested in a Hi-Tie. If you are going to do portable corrals, I highly recommend you look at something metallic.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  If I had the money

                                  If I had the money I'd buy one of these...

                                  http://www.horse-cents.net/Pricing+Options.htm

                                  I saw one at a trail ride and it was awesome.

                                  This one looks interesting too

                                  http://www.portable-horse-corral.com...se-corral.html
                                  Missouri Fox Trotters-To ride one is to own one

                                  Standardbreds, so much more then a harness racing horse.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    corral and camping

                                    Has anyone used this one? It's a lot like PVC, but it's supposed to be a lot stronger.

                                    www.carrilitecorral.centaurfencing.com
                                    Horse'in around in Upstate NY

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      marta:
                                      Sorry to come in late, but just wanted to let you know I feel your pain : - )
                                      I have friends who do major camping trips and are all equipped with trailers with LQ (damn them). I sleep in the back of my SUV and for 2-3 nights it is just fine. Longer than that and the picket line starts to look inviting...
                                      I use a foam pad under a sleeping bag and sleep like a hibernating bear.

                                      Agree with the posters who suggest a haybag for the picket line. Less mess, less wasted hay and only a minimal chance your horse will wind the line used to hang the bag around his neck like mine and stand there looking embarassed until I unwound him.

                                      I've found experienced campers are ready to answer all my questions and show me how to do things right. Make sure you know how to tie a knot to keep horse on the picket line. My first attempt allowed horse to untie himself and go walking over to introduce himself to the next set of picketed horses who were NOT amused. This was at about 11P, I was informed of his adventure by someone banging on my window shouting "Your Horse!"
                                      Needless to say I levitated off the mattress, into my jeans and out of the car expecting total tragedy...
                                      Found: No Biggie, I retrieved horse, retied and went back to bed.
                                      The "Yeller" was a less-experienced camper (even more so than me!) who panicked - friends told me he shoulda tried to recapture the loose horse first, then gone looking for the owner. What-ever\
                                      So how did your camping trip go?
                                      *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                                      Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                                      Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                                      Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        High tie

                                        The high tie can be as complex as a nuclear power plant or simple and effective.

                                        You do want to protect the trees. Use a couple of old western girths to prevent the rope from girdling the tree bark (killing the tree)

                                        Stretch a 1/2 nylon rope between the girths or web straps. You could use a ratchet load binder to pull it tight. But a tall person or a short person on a rock works.

                                        Don't buy carabiners, knot-savers, or anything for high lining. Use a loop of 1/4 nylon rope in a "Prussic Loop" to attach you lead line to the high line. The Prussic loop is adjustable on the high line for position and is a safety release in case of emergency. It'll break under extreme pressure or you can cut it with a knife quickly. Then knot the cut ends and you're ready for use again. Also, the Prussic loops don't clank together while riding on the trail.

                                        How to describe using the Prussic loop is the hardest part.

                                        go to this site >> http://pkrigerjr.tripod.com/highline.html
                                        Equus makus brokus but happy

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