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Do you ride in "no tresspassing" areas?

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  • Originally posted by paulaedwina View Post
    I think alot of it is fear of liability. Fix that and I think alot of people will unclench. But as long as you can get sued for someone injuring themselves on your property you're going to want to control who comes on and what they're doing.

    Paula
    This A.M. I took a tumble off my filly in MY arena at the farm that I own and broke my wrist. At the emergency room they asked me at least four different times and in different wording if I fell off somewhere but at MY farm. That was so that my insurance company could pass the $ to some other persons insurance company.

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    • And don't be surprised when your health insurance asks where you fell so they can make your farm insurance pay....

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      • Damn! I haven't read all of the responses and I just saw the title jumping forums. HELL NO it's not OK to ride past no trespassing signs. It is not OK to enter someone elses property. For your own safety you can get shot directly for trespassing or by accident from game hunting or target shooting. They might have dogs and guess who isn't responsible if you and your horse get attacked riding on private property. You really think you want to ride on that person's property? Go ask for permission. Some people won't care and say yes, some people will care and say "for one or two horses, OK" some will say "no, we shoot on the property" and some will say "no, it's my property and I don't want you on it". But you better ask first.

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        • I am surprised that some folks think its ok to ride on land that is marked NO TRESPASSING....I pay my taxes on that land and in NY that ain't cheap..also insurance and upkeep, signs are there for a reason. When I see folks traipsing thru my woods I do not hesitate to practice my shooting or let my dogs out or make tons of noise with my tractor...I also have no issue with calling the police out.

          Its all about respect. I also have no problem giving permission to hunt/fish or ride but I need to know where you are because I do have animals out there as well and even if they are not in the same field does not mean that they cant be spooked. There are also bear and other wild animals that I would like to warn you about.

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          • In the towns in my area of CT, conservations lands which have been given to the towns, which I believe is what folks are referring to as "conservations lands", each town has published the land use. New conservation land is anticipated by hikers in the the area, and we wait for the town to put up signs or decide on its use. Some may be off limits, but most of the time trails are allowed to be used, or made, and the land is opened to the public. When this happens, the towns always address horse riding, as well as mountain bikes, hiking, ATVs, dirt bikes. Local groups may go before the town to propose allowing certain use, and describing how their club might care for the trails if allowed to use them.

            Anyway, I was surprised to hear, here, so much of how conservation land is not available for recreational use, as my experience in my part of CT was that it usually is open for hiking, mountain bikes and horses, at least. Local scout groups usually go in and armour the water crossings and build bridges. A local horse club usually teams up with them and with mountain bike clubs to do the same. Its easy enough to go to the town recreation part of a town's website and find out what lands are available to ride on or not ride on. I think it responsible to do just that, and to know what lands are ok and what ones are not, what ones are private, and recognized them when you come upon them out on your ride. In our area, many many private owners have allowed horses to ride through their property, usually requiring some form of liablity waiver or, for instance, the club gets the property named on their insurance, and the owner's rules are followed.

            For example, part of a trail behind a raptor rescue and rehab sancuary is required that horses slow to a walk, talking is silenced, and care is taken to avoid and not speak to anyone on foot because they may be flying a bird and you don't want to disturb or spook them.

            A local farmers extensive hay fields are available to ride in only after the last harvest of the season, and during season only along certain edges of the field, and often not at all certain times of the season. By adhering to the wishes of the private owners, all of these lands are available for the club's use at certain times for hunt pace and endurance events.

            A good relationship with the local landowners goes a long way towards fostering good will, and most importantly securing access to the trails and lands decades into the future for horses and horse activities. As a result of this kind of policy and responsibility towards private owners, the horse club in my area has secured permission to ride on town conservation lands, state forest lands, private farm and hardwood woodlands, lawns, dirt roads, powerlines and privat driveways from the shoreline in CT almost if not entirely contiguously through the state into Massachussetts and Vermont. They spend weeks every year maintaining current trails and clearing older trails in support of a CT trailways and greenways association, and the work they do and the respect they show towards permission and responsibility to the access of trails for horses goes a long way towards fostering good will towards horse riding on trailways in the state.

            I would urge any rider to do their due diligence and research the property owners they want to ride on and get in touch with them and get permission to ride on the lands they want to ride on. It will benefit all riders now and in the future, and can give a precident to call upon for good will when getting horse riding permissions and access to new town conservation land.
            My warmbloods have actually drunk mulled wine in the past. Not today though. A drunk warmblood is a surly warmblood. - WildandWickedWarmbloods

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            • I have a sad follow-up to this conversation. I just lost riding privileges on a key piece of property in my neighborhood that I have had riding rights on for years.

              Why? Was it something I did? My abuse of the property? Nope.

              It was a combo of two things - hunters poaching on the property, and a commercial boarding barn sending large groups of riders of all levels out on it without permission.

              In the course of several convos with the property owner, I did manage to retain rights to walk and walk our dog, but no more riding. Realistically, she is not in position to police which riders do and do not have permission, so she has closed the land to all.

              In addition, the boarders from the commercial barn were extremely rude to the neighbor who challenged them, and the BO was extremely rude to the property owner when the PO called the BO.

              Pretty much a recipe to ensure an outbreak of No Trespassing signs.

              So, please, any of you who ride out -

              Know whose land you're riding on, make sure of your permission, and make sure you know the boundaries of their land so you don't accidentally trespass on a neighbor's land.

              Riding on other people's land is one of those occasions in life where it is NOT better to ask forgiveness later rather than permission first.

              Respect the property owner - stay to the edges of fields or on established trails, be mindful of newly seeded areas and deep footing where horses will do a lot of damage, stay AWAY from houses, yards, outbuildings and livestock. Report anything you see amiss to the land owner.

              Be a good ambassador for our sport and other riders whenever you encounter anyone out riding, be as gracious and polite as possible.

              An appreciative phone call, thank you note or a little gift to show appreciation to the land owner is never a bad idea. Remember, they have lots and lots of good reasons to close their land, and very few reasons, other than good will, to keep it open.
              The plural of anecdote is not data.

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              • I'm very sorry you lost your privileges for reasons beyond your control. It's a textbook example of bad behavior, lack of consideration, sense of entitlement and being terrible representatives of our sport - with a sadly predictable outcome. Shame on the boarding barn owner for his/her actions; I hope karma comes back to bite him/her and the rude clients.
                It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.

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                • No Tresspassing! Seems pretty simple...or did I miss something?

                  Riders and horses aren't special, the laws apply to us also. A dog "tresspassing" in a field full of horses brings all sorts of anger on the board....no difference.

                  I try and get in touch with the property's owners (or check with people who know them for an introduction). I try and show respect for them, their wishes and property.

                  I used to ride on land owned by a Saudi. I had permission to ride the land. I ran into him one day and thanked him for the use of the trails. He responded, "Horses are good for the land". I later found out from some foreign service friends he was relieving me of the need to be beholden to him by saying the horses benefitted him too so no thank-you was necessary. Pretty neat way of doing it.

                  Tresspass? Oh hell no. But...where there were right-of-ways and a jerk decided that people shouldn't be "tresspassing" on what he liked to keep for himself and that wasn't his to fence...that's where some good wire cutters and sign ripping took place.
                  "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"

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                  • I didn't read thru all the posts, but let me share my example ... I have my OWN riding trails and no tresspassing signs GALORE. Why? 2 many reasons to list, but let me give you the 2 strongest reasons:

                    1) I have a shooting range in full use in my woods also, in and around my riding trails .... ANY trespassers would be compromising their own safety, and that of their horse (OMG!).

                    2) When I recently called around to explore the potential of improved Home Insurance rates, they asked, "Do you have a pool? Hot Tub? Pond? Horses?" I had a NO to all... except the horses. When we got to that point, the insurance adjustor said, "I will take no more of your time. Our policy is not to insure anyone who has horses, or allows them on the property."

                    ... I believe it was Progressive I called then. Now I realize, I am FORTUNATE to have the policy I have. It was taken out at a time when horses weren't grounds for prohibition. ... Now let's put this into perspective... banks REQUIRE full home insurance as a condition attached to EVERY mortgage. So... if you lose your insurance... you ALSO lose everything attached TO IT... that means your property, your barn, your house .... basically, EVERY SINGLE THING YOU EVER WORKED FOR IN YOUR LIFE. Just because a horse was allowed on the property.

                    Why would ANY property owner take that risk for a 3rd party who doesn't even pay rent? Even if your land is paid off, property owners are FULLY LIABLE for anything that happens on the property. Even with a SIGNED WAIVER, yes, you may win in court, but you could spend upwards of $250,000 fighting to PROVE you are innocent.
                    "If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up somewhere else."

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Ambitious Kate View Post
                      Anyway, I was surprised to hear, here, so much of how conservation land is not available for recreational use, as my experience in my part of CT was that it usually is open for hiking, mountain bikes and horses, at least. Local scout groups usually go in and armour the water crossings and build bridges.
                      Maybe it's a New England thing, because I'm surprised as well. Most of the publicly owned (town, state) conservation land here is publicly accessible, with recreational use not only allowed, but encouraged and published. You can look on the town's website and they list all the parcels, have maps of trails, etc.. We also have boys doing Eagle Scout projects to make bridges, clear trails and have a Conservation Trust that also helps maintain trails. There are always signs detailing any restrictions concerning what activities are allowed and where.

                      Privately owned conservation land (whether by a developer who was forced by the town to restrict some land in a new development or by private conservation groups) is different. It may or may not be publicly accessible and you don't use it unless you know the story or have permission. There is a developer owned restricted parcel, right up the side of my driveway, with a town controlled trail easement on it. The trail is open to the public, but only the trail. People can hike, bike, cross country ski or ride horses on it. The trail connects two pieces of town owned conservation land. The Conservation Trust maintains the trail and so do we (they know we do it!)...we use it to get from here to there, so we clear brush and poison ivy encroaching on the trail and repair a bridge if we find it to be getting difficult to get through. Anyone can walk along that path and nearly everyone is respectful, it's steps off my property and much of our yard basically a field, big and open and we don't grow anything but random grass on it...no horseback rider has ever indulged an urge to go have a nice gallop, though I'm sure it's tempting...I'd let them if they asked and signed a waiver .

                      Comment


                      • Trespassers. Don't even get me started. Really. Makes my blood boil (understatement). I wish more sensible people lived around here.

                        Stay. Off. My. Property. 'Fore someone gets hurt.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by magnum View Post
                          I didn't read thru all the posts, but let me share my example ... I have my OWN riding trails and no tresspassing signs GALORE. Why? 2 many reasons to list, but let me give you the 2 strongest reasons:

                          1) I have a shooting range in full use in my woods also, in and around my riding trails .... ANY trespassers would be compromising their own safety, and that of their horse (OMG!).

                          2) When I recently called around to explore the potential of improved Home Insurance rates, they asked, "Do you have a pool? Hot Tub? Pond? Horses?" I had a NO to all... except the horses. When we got to that point, the insurance adjustor said, "I will take no more of your time. Our policy is not to insure anyone who has horses, or allows them on the property."

                          ... I believe it was Progressive I called then. Now I realize, I am FORTUNATE to have the policy I have. It was taken out at a time when horses weren't grounds for prohibition. ... Now let's put this into perspective... banks REQUIRE full home insurance as a condition attached to EVERY mortgage. So... if you lose your insurance... you ALSO lose everything attached TO IT... that means your property, your barn, your house .... basically, EVERY SINGLE THING YOU EVER WORKED FOR IN YOUR LIFE. Just because a horse was allowed on the property.

                          Why would ANY property owner take that risk for a 3rd party who doesn't even pay rent? Even if your land is paid off, property owners are FULLY LIABLE for anything that happens on the property. Even with a SIGNED WAIVER, yes, you may win in court, but you could spend upwards of $250,000 fighting to PROVE you are innocent.
                          How odd. I live in Ohio and am insured with State Farm. No problems what so ever with horses on the property. I do choose carry a separate equine liability policy on the horses with an equine insurance agency. There is no requirement for me do so, it is my personal choice.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Canaqua View Post
                            Maybe it's a New England thing, because I'm surprised as well. Most of the publicly owned (town, state) conservation land here is publicly accessible, with recreational use not only allowed, but encouraged and published. .
                            The post referenced privately held conservation land - not public.

                            Conservation groups (including government) often close the land or certain areas of it because there are threatened or endangered plants or animals on the land. Or, they are conducting research or restoring habitat and do not want the area disturbed. Not that they need any reason to close the land - but when they do that is usually why.

                            I can think of a few trails on a local WMA that were closed - and for good reason. The bridges had washed out and were unstable. Sometimes land is posted because there are hidden hazards.

                            In Virginia, if you are caught trespassing it is considered a civil matter at first. The landowner can send a Notice of Trespass to the offender, and send a copy to the local sheriff. Show up on that land again - and you will be arrested for criminal trespass. Before folks laugh and think no one could figure out who you are... don't be so sure. The horse world is small.
                            Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                            Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                            -Rudyard Kipling

                            Comment


                            • I am astonished that this question is even being posed. If anyone who owns land does not want others on it without explicit permission, that's their right. They don't need a reason.

                              Those who trespass despite the signs clearly didn't grow up in Texas. There is landowner etiquette, mind you. The first shot is always intentionally high.

                              Comment


                              • The only "NO Tresspassing" area I ride in is my closest neighbor's farm because they specifically told me that the signs do not apply to me. I would never dream of violating someone's property like that. I would be livid if someone did it to me.

                                Comment


                                • My husband is a river fisherman and the law says fishermen can fish 'x' amount of feet from the water. But the poor farmers have such a time with rudeness, fishing lines left around, with hooks on them, wire fences cut or lifted up, garbage, etc. that there is really bad blood between them and the fishermen, ruining it for all.

                                  It does not take a lot to treat others as you would like to be treated...and it is too bad a few fishermen ruin it for the responsible ones.

                                  I miss those fresh-caught rainbows frizzled in the pan with lots of butter....
                                  Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

                                  Comment


                                  • No I do not trespass.

                                    I don't know about other states but my state of WI road right of way is 66 feet from the center line. Also in my state you do NOT have to post your land warning No Trespassing. YOU are expected to know where YOU are and do your own research to know when you are trespassing. Personal responsibility and all. If it's not YOUR land it's up to you to know whom it belongs to and take the necessary steps to avoid trespass or ask permission.

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