• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

It just occurred to me...mounting from the ground *eek*

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    My horse is only 14.3 and I'm still young enough to be spry but I try to avoid mounting from the ground whenever possible. No need to put extra stress on the horse's back! He would NOT stand still to be mounted when I got him, so that was one of the first things he learned, which led to learning to be mounted from any object available. He's sidled up to just about anything for me to get on.

    Oh, and another good thing to work on is using unstable objects for mounting, because out on trail a rotten log might be the only thing around, and you don't want your horse to panic if you push off from an object and it collapses underneath you
    RIP Victor... I'll miss you, you big galumph.

    Comment


    • #22
      I prefer not to mount from the ground. I can reach my 15.2 guy, but too much strain. I find a rock, log or put him in a small ditch, even a few inches helps!

      But I have been practicing though, because I am joining a group where it is required. It is a sweep rider organization, and you need to be able to get on/off right there, in case of a situation. Mounting from the off side from the ground is NOT a pretty sight. I'm getting better though! I will not be doing this as an ongoing event, but it is good to know that it can be done.
      "Do your best, and leave the rest, twill all come right, some day or night" -Black Beauty

      http://trails-and-trials-with-major.blogspot.com/

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by Kitt View Post
        Mounting from the ground is something you should be able to do (within reason) if necessary, but as a matter of course, you're better off using a mounting block, fence rail, wall, rock, stump, truck bumper, log, hillock, or whatever. Mounting from the ground is tough on your horse's back, your flocking (if you have an English saddle) and your saddle tree.

        They make stirrups that you can lower down to make mounting easier if physically( like arthritis) you can't do it. If someone is just out of shape there really is no excuse and you should be able to get into the saddle w/o something to climb on. If you have to scratch, claw and hang off your horse( pulling the saddle sideways) before you can get on it's back then I personally think the person should invest in a work out routine or get a horse more suited for their size , because mounting like that more than likely will cause back problems and may not be good on your saddle either. If you are able to spring up from the ground and smoothly into the saddle ( as can only be done by actually doing it as a part of everyday riding) you are not going to hurt your horse or saddle. Someday you may not have something to climb onto, or your horse may not be cooperative to stand and if you and your horse part company unexpectedly, then you are in trouble.

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by ReSomething View Post
          My first re riding trainer told me about dropping a stirrup. Just what it says, pull down the buckle and let it out about six inches and make sure to hop three times so you don't yank the whole saddle over. Keep track how many holes because you have to put the stirrup back. Keep your foot in the stirrup, pull up till you can buckle it on the right hole. Grab ahold of the under strap and step down to put the buckle back under your thigh.
          I was taught this method as well, but we've learned through complicated imagining that this really torqued a horse's back, especially if you aren't a real lightweight.

          If you can't mount from the ground lightly (like we did when we were kids or if you are still skinny w/long legs), then it's actually better for the horse to mount from an object.

          ALL the horses who I think I will be riding are taught to sidepass up to anything I point them at: rocks, barrels,pick-up truck tailgates, picnic tables, holding walls. I once even used a CAT -- or it was some sort of huge yellow machine they had parked in the woods for logging. I'd been looking for a place to dismount and ....uh...take a "Nature" break, but hadn't found a likely place to get back up.

          I put my little mare right up again those big metal plates they use to cover the wheels (sorry I'm so bad on my heavy machinery lingo).

          You teach them this from both sides and that they stand till you say "go." I'm too old to play pony express.

          Now I am due for THR #2 and are less limber than ever. I am thinking seriously of teaching my next saddle horse to "bow" to let me get on...

          So don't feel bad. It's not so important how you get on, but how you STAY on!

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by candyappy View Post
            They make stirrups that you can lower down to make mounting easier if physically( like arthritis) you can't do it. If someone is just out of shape there really is no excuse and you should be able to get into the saddle w/o something to climb on. If you have to scratch, claw and hang off your horse( pulling the saddle sideways) before you can get on it's back then I personally think the person should invest in a work out routine or get a horse more suited for their size , because mounting like that more than likely will cause back problems and may not be good on your saddle either. If you are able to spring up from the ground and smoothly into the saddle ( as can only be done by actually doing it as a part of everyday riding) you are not going to hurt your horse or saddle. Someday you may not have something to climb onto, or your horse may not be cooperative to stand and if you and your horse part company unexpectedly, then you are in trouble.
            I sense you are not yet real old. Wait till you have arthritis in all your hips & knees.

            However I DO agree that the better shape you are in, the more limber you are, the better rider you are going to be. But for many people "riding" really just consists of sitting on a walking or slow jogging horse while exploring Nature. They are just another weight the horse has to carry. I don't really call what they do "riding".

            There are PLENTY of people who ride at this level or only slightly above. I don't think the horses are treated badly or abused, but I would not say the riders OR horses are trained to any special degree of horsemanship. Pretty much forward, stop, left & right. Go where I point you.

            I've seen plenty of "poker rides" that are perfect examples. As long as the horses aren't being abused (and most of these aren't, 'cause they are only ridden maybe 12 times or less per year), I can't honestly bust these people for their marked lack of "true horsemanship."

            Some people take lessons in ballroom dancing but not everyone wants to explore it that deeply; some just like to get out there and shake it around...

            Same with "riding".

            However, after reading about the OP's reason for asking, I really urge her to train her horse SOLIDLY to be mounted from all kinds of objects. The EZ mount thing is not only not good for the horse's back, it is something you have to take on and off (or not? seems like it would be sort of dangerous to leave on...).

            Imagine doing that while you horse dances around trying to catch up with the others? Better to just teach it to stay put while you hop on, get their reward (which WILL help them stay put) and go on.

            Buck Brannaman teaches you how to train you horse to do this, and I'm sure other horse trainers do as well.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #26
              Candyappy, I do see where you're coming from - and even at 47 with RA, I'm more fit than the average, but definitely not thrilled with learning something that I won't use very often. The horses ARE my workout (I have 6 at home but ride one almost daily now, conditioning for endurance) - if my life depended on it, I'm pretty sure I could get back on my horse, from the ground. But as others have pointed out, it's not good for the horse, or saddle. What a relief!

              I bought the EZ stirrup to stick in my bag for the odd emergency, but we've worked on it today - mounting from odd-ball objects and who knew? my mare doesn't have a problem with much at all - she's so awesome . I'm going to be trying mounted archery from the same horse this summer...she's pretty unflappable!

              Comment


              • #27
                Glad to hear your horse cooperates! My other suggestion would be to train her to (or make sure she's ok with) you pushing and pulling on her as you mount. It's great if you can find a level surface to use, but I know I often find myself on something that I'm sort of balancing on. It's great if I can line my horse up, grab a handful or mane, and use his neck as support to climb up before I can hop on.

                For some horses this is a very strange sensation at first, but they usually all accept it once they know the drill.
                Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

                Comment


                • #28
                  Glad to hear your horse cooperates! My other suggestion would be to train her to (or make sure she's ok with) you pushing and pulling on her as you mount. It's great if you can find a level surface to use, but I know I often find myself on something that I'm sort of balancing on. It's great if I can line my horse up, grab a handful or mane, and use his neck as support to climb up before I can hop on.

                  For some horses this is a very strange sensation at first, but they usually all accept it once they know the drill.
                  Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by katarine View Post
                    Required of you by whom??
                    Competitve trail will require dismounts and sometimes offside dismounts remounts.... the reasoning is that you may at times get yourself into a position on a trail that mandates an offside dismount/remount

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      This makes me remember that dropping the stirrup was the only way we could get my mom back on when she came off in deep snow. Leaving the narrow trail we kept open to find something to stand on wasn't possible. We used to trail ride all winter- always an adventure.

                      ETA, yes I had to do an offside dismount once. Steep downhill, trying to go around a mass of deep slippery mud where there was a spring, my horse pushed into some trees/large shrubs and getting off was best option. I could barely manage even an off-side dismount as branches were trapping my leg.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #31
                        Well see what you guys are teaching me . Today I'll practice off-side and see how much she'll tolerate with me pulling on her.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by clanter View Post
                          Competitve trail will require dismounts and sometimes offside dismounts remounts.... the reasoning is that you may at times get yourself into a position on a trail that mandates an offside dismount/remount
                          We have to be careful when we use the term "competitive trail."

                          There are a bunch of sanctioning organizations for "Competitive Trail Rides" all with different rules, most of them regional and NATRC being national.

                          The only one, to my knowledge (and by all means, please pipe up if YOUR regional CTR organization does), that may require judged mounts, is NATRC.

                          Please don't think you are limited from competing in our sport if you have difficulty, for whatever reason, mounting from the ground.

                          I can get on from the ground if I am REALLY ticked off (e.g. after an unplanned dismount that left me embarrassed but unhurt), even onto my 16+H endurance horse, but I assure you, I rarely do, and I've been competing in AERC Endurance and ECTRA CTRs for well over a decade on a variety of steeds.

                          You can do it too!

                          --Patti

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            My horse figured out mounting from strange objects very quickly, as in if he didnt get near it I'd have to walk (riding bareback). Suits him, he is nobody's fool. Me on the other hand..

                            I never laughed so hard on one trip watching friend mount from a log. Bounce, bounce, up, up, scramble,scramble, and tip, tip and all the way over and down on the ground on the other side. Horse had serious what's up with these chicks? look on his face.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Instead of lining your horse up parallel with a log, make them step their front end over the log and stop there. Makes it very easy to step into the saddle, then ask them to move on and bring their hind legs over.

                              I no longer ride horses larger than 15 hands
                              Facta non verba

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                I could mount my old guy from the ground at 16.3 because his wither was good enough to keep the saddle in place and I had taught him to stand until He got his mint (thankyouverymuch), which allowed me to take a step back before hiking my left foot up that high, and then hopping in (facing his tail) as part of my two hops before swinging over. We only did this to teach him, and then as an emergency measure.

                                My new guy has zero in terms of withers and it is almost impossible to get on even with a mounting aid, without a little saddle slippage. Luckily, he's a whole lot shorter and I use whatever I can find. The no move without a mint is quite helpful in his case too!

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by patti View Post
                                  Oh good heavens, I don't mount from the ground either.

                                  Bumpers, guardrails, tree stumps, big rocks, a nice hill, putting my horse in the ditch, fallen tree, tailgates, buckets, you name it, my horse will stand next to it and I'll mount from it.

                                  I tell people that for me, seeing a nice rock or tree stump on a ride brings out a Pavlov-like response in me -- makes me have to pe since I have a handy mounting block right there to get back on.

                                  What!?? TMI?
                                  this is me too~ My horse is 16.3 .. plus we've all learned of late its not good to mount from the ground anyway.
                                  He & I are a P-break team here too
                                  IN GOD WE TRUST
                                  OTTB's ready to show/event/jumpers. Track ponies for perfect trail partners.
                                  http://www.horseville.com/php/search...=1&ssid=057680

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by patti View Post
                                    We have to be careful when we use the term "competitive trail."

                                    There are a bunch of sanctioning organizations for "Competitive Trail Rides" all with different rules, most of them regional and NATRC being national.



                                    --Patti
                                    yes NATRC ...they will allow use of natural objects... rocks or whatever

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #38
                                      Patti, you bring up another question for me regarding the endurance ride.....so, where does one "go" when nature calls? This never occurred to me either!! Dear god what else am I forgetting to ask about.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by hundredacres View Post
                                        Patti, you bring up another question for me regarding the endurance ride.....so, where does one "go" when nature calls? This never occurred to me either!! Dear god what else am I forgetting to ask about.
                                        I suspect the same place you'd "go" if you were hiking a trail!!!

                                        I can still get up from the ground, but it's unpleasant for me and the horse. So I use a mounting block in the barn and this http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Mount-Hor.../dp/B0012DQEP4 Mine is a prior brand called a "GiddyUp." I made a "bucket" to carry it on the saddle. Here are some photos:

                                        http://s784.photobucket.com/user/Smi...tml?sort=3&o=9

                                        http://s784.photobucket.com/user/Smi...tml?sort=3&o=6

                                        I ride a Stubben Scout saddle and it attaches nicely to the right pommel.

                                        You do have to have a horse that stands quietly for mounting, however, as you don't have a lot of "wiggle room." I changed the nylon thong for a leather one, as leather will break in the event of a "problem."

                                        To use it, remove from the bucket; position the horse (with you on the natural up-side, if any); unfold the legs and position the stool; mount; pull it up with the thong; fold the legs; wrap the thong; and secure in the bucket. The thong wraps around the legs. I tie a large knot at my end of the thong and hold it in my hand; I don't wrap the thong around my wrist or finger or anything like that.

                                        It works quite well and is not expensive.

                                        Good luck in your exploration of the discipline.

                                        G.
                                        Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by clanter View Post
                                          Competitve trail will require dismounts and sometimes offside dismounts remounts.... the reasoning is that you may at times get yourself into a position on a trail that mandates an offside dismount/remount
                                          Which organization?
                                          ACTHA?
                                          NATRC?
                                          123PDQ?

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X