• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Trail Riding Pet Peeve

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #41
    I also think that (as a generalization of course) endurance riders are the group that provides the best care to their horses- the most turn out, knowledge about nutrition and hoof care, etc.

    Even with poor riding, endurance horses tend to be a lot sounder than horses in other disciplines. Maybe it is because Arabs are so hardy, or maybe because of the really good care that they receive, especially not being stalled.

    Comment


    • #42
      Originally posted by saratoga View Post
      Maybe it is because Arabs are so hardy, or maybe because of the really good care that they receive, especially not being stalled.
      My barnmates who ride endurance keep their horses in stalls with 6 hours a day on 1/4 acre, 18 hours in a stall....
      ----------------------------------------
      PSSM / EPSM and Shivers Forum
      http://pssm.xanthoria.com/
      ----------------------------------------

      Comment


      • #43
        well ... all I can say is:

        Growing up, I was brought up riding in a classical school in europe.I still compete in dressage and stadium jumping. However I am a longtime endurance rider.

        And on that note..

        After about 60 miles - please for the love of god, someone trot out my horse at vet check for me, because my knees won't straighten.
        After about 75 miles.. my back is a perma-ache, and I feel like the hunch back of Notre Dame has been reborn
        After about 89 miles...my legs are shot, I can neither straighten my knees, or bend an ankle, or have an ounce of leg muscle energy left to use!

        At 100 miles, thank freaking god for the finish line... just let me slide off my horse into a boneless heap on the ground and lay there to die for a few hours.. swing by and pick me up in the morning -- I'm ok with that.

        - Moral is: I don't even come close to resembling the me that climbed in the saddle at 4 am that morning.
        Originally posted by ExJumper
        Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.

        Comment


        • #44
          Originally posted by Xanthoria View Post
          My barnmates who ride endurance keep their horses in stalls with 6 hours a day on 1/4 acre, 18 hours in a stall....
          In my experience, endurance riders tend to be do-it-yourselfers who keep horses at their homes or pasture boarding...there doesnt seem to be as many who keep them in traditional boarding stables, or who would want to. But of course there are exceptions. I am guessing that you maybe live in the LA area or someplace where space is extremely limited?

          rainechyldes- I definitely get tired and sore also but I dont feel like it affects my riding *that* much. I always make an effort to sit up and straight and keep supporting myself and help to balance my horse, in spite of how tired I am. I do see a lot of people that I feel like are burdening their horse when they get fatigued by posting really heavy, leaning to one side, standing in the stirrups, etc.

          Comment


          • #45
            Originally posted by saratoga View Post
            rainechyldes- I definitely get tired and sore also but I dont feel like it affects my riding *that* much. I always make an effort to sit up and straight and keep supporting myself and help to balance my horse, in spite of how tired I am. I do see a lot of people that I feel like are burdening their horse when they get fatigued by posting really heavy, leaning to one side, standing in the stirrups, etc.
            Aye I was being a bit tongue and cheek in my post - people who aren't endurance riders I think sometimes skip past the part of understanding the word 'endurance' exists in the name for a reason both for horse and rider.

            Also - personal perception applies- We all may think we aren't riding a bit on the crap side after 90 miles, but really compared to how we sat our horse at the start gate - we surely are.

            I found core strength training my saviour for that, but I do have a leg issue, thanks to a nasty nasty break many years back, and when I'm tired - I won't lie - it definitely shows.
            Originally posted by ExJumper
            Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.

            Comment


            • #46
              Many can start an 100 mile race, not all finish...Especially Tevis.

              Comment


              • #47
                I wouldn't say that anyone could stick with riding a horse for the length of time required at the Tevis Cup. There are people out there who probably wouldn't be able to deal with a 25 or 50 miler. If you are a seasoned endurance rider and genuinely good at what you do and have a willing partner for a horse you have all of my respect. Even a beginning endurance rider who goes about it in all the right ways is a wonderful sight. But I agree that there are some riders who really are too much in their horses mouths. Yank, yank, yank! It annoys me when I see it regardless of discipline. It makes me wonder if the horse will have dental issues because it is simply so bad sometimes. Personally, I have a neurological disability that affects me still from seven years ago. My balance is hindered to begin with. You probably won't see the same posture by the end of any length of a ride from me. It would be silly to expect it. However, I always try to keep the horse in mind by being courteous to them and attempting to remain balanced. Give it your best shot, folks. I don't know many people who will look exactly the same after a 100 mile ride. Well, perhaps an android.
                Midnite Farm: Quality Arabians & Stock Horses
                http://midnitefarm.weebly.com/
                Home to Midnite Faaris 2010 Homozygous Black Arabian Stallion

                Comment


                • #48
                  Jeez! You have new participants in the growing sport of endurance in this economy and so annoyed that they are buying expensive made horses. Why not mentor, educate, give clinics, give encouragement and help people get into it correctly rather than being snobs and picking on them?
                  Karen Grimes, Horse Farm Realtor Ocala, owner Farm Tours of Ocala Just say no to snow! http://www.horsedirtforsale.com

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    You want to see bad/crazy, etc., watch the extreme trail riders who gallop their horses into trailers and they swing off the top of the trailer,, among other wonderful yayhoo type moments. There are crazy/lazy people in all disciplines.
                    "We, too, will be remembered not for victories or defeats in battle or in politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit." JFK

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Originally posted by ReSomething View Post
                      but endurance is just a long trail ride right?
                      This made me giggle! It depends on your version of trail ride I guess. I had a gnarly endurance trainer, I had to 3 point all my hills, post trot any flat areas, and when going down hill there had better be a gap between my crotch and his back. Oh, and bareback. Not such a fun trail ride, right? I was young then, at 16 it's fun to be that fit I would love to go back, be that crazy, but I have a hunter prince thoroughbred that has nervous breakdowns over goats. Someday.

                      I still go secretary or P&R at CTRs to keep myself in the loop. A lot of backyard women (ok a few guys, you know those few that dare venture into our world?) that are clueless tend to show up along with actual endurance riders. It's sad to see people get excited, and then at the end they hate it because there's SO much to be learned that they haven't learned, and there horses didnt fair well or they had some scary moments.

                      There is a mentor program, but I found it pretty personally.

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Originally posted by saratoga View Post
                        I also think that (as a generalization of course) endurance riders are the group that provides the best care to their horses- the most turn out, knowledge about nutrition and hoof care, etc.

                        Even with poor riding, endurance horses tend to be a lot sounder than horses in other disciplines. Maybe it is because water delivery los angeles Arabs are so hardy, or maybe because of the really good care that they receive, especially not being stalled.
                        i think you're right on track here!

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Originally posted by Daydream Believer View Post
                          You see it in all disciplines. Dressage in particular people can go out and buy a very well trained horse and be showing FEI levels relatively quickly. I've seen a lot of "ammies" riding horses like that with a poor seat and just barely getting through it. Used to drive me nuts...now I feel sorry for them as most will pay a fortune to some trainer just to keep the horse rideable for them.
                          I saw tons of this at a regional championship show. Riders that were WAY overmounted simply because they could afford to be. I even saw one carted off in an ambulance after being dumped before even entering the arena. My immediate reaction is outrage and envy, but then I remember the whole world is pretty much wired this way and I'm way luckier than most people to own a horse at all.
                          Allah took a handful of southerly wind, blew His breath over it, and created the horse. Thou shall fly without wings, and conquer without any sword, O, Horse!
                          Anonymous Bedouin legend

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            Originally posted by sorrelfilly721 View Post
                            but then I remember the whole world is pretty much wired this way and I'm way luckier than most people to own a horse at all.
                            This makes me smile. A whole bunch.

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              Originally posted by TBRedHead View Post
                              It's sad to see people get excited, and then at the end they hate it because there's SO much to be learned that they haven't learned, and there horses didnt fair well or they had some scary moments.

                              There is a mentor program, but I found it pretty personally.
                              Totally. There are people out there doing whatever their sport is, correctly, and often they have one too many horses to ride. If you can link up with peoplewho are doing what you want to do by having good manners and showing up in work gloves and throwing hay bales and mowing pastures, you can get "in" with someone who you can help and they can help you. You can pay with sweat equity or you can pay with money. I don't think it is very impressive to repeat the commonly-held but incorrect belief that it is so nearly impossible to get horse time if you aren't born with a silver spoon in your mouth. It is mostly just harder than most people want to work. Show up, pay attention, wear out some work gloves and don't believe the naysayers.
                              http://www.camstock.net/

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                The OP's complaint is not a new one. In general things have improved..really. I was at a vetcheck in the 70's, and as the riders came in my jaw dropped. I couldn't believe they had the absolute nerve to subject their horses to this.

                                There will always be the wanna be's. One can only hope that the performance and preparation of the top riders will sink in .
                                Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                                Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  Endurance riders = Masochists

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    a push-button, highly trained horse can make a huge difference to how the rider looks....can make even a bad rider look good.
                                    Teaching Horseback Riding Lessons: A Practical Training Manual for Instructors

                                    Stop Wasting Hay and Extend Consumption Time With Round Bale Hay Nets!!

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Just like other generalizations, the "endurance riders take the best care of their horses" is not true either. Anyone who is a HORSEMAN and spends every day watching every detail of their horse's care takes the best care of their horse. Like *gasp* eventer me. Or my best friend, who does 50 mile endurance races.

                                      Also, it does have its own ugly underbelly. People gloss over the poorly managed horses, saying, oh they will get pulled, they will be fine. How about the horses that get run off their feet getting a top ten then go into metabolic collapse after the finish? How about the horses that colic and die within 24 hours because they were pushed beyond their physiological limits? How about the horses with permanent back or leg injuries the resulted from the rider choosing their placing over what was best for their horse? Yeah, it happens a LOT. I've seen it and I do wish AERC would do a better job rewarding horsemanship and have more penalties for ending up back at your campsite with a horse whose legs are shaking who is in lactic acid toxicity and needed 8 bags of IV fluids just so he wouldn't die right there.

                                      There ARE great horse people in endurance, like I said, my BFF is one of them who did it right and spent TWO YEARS training and conditioning her horse and herself before competing. But it also cannot be said that there are not some very very bad things going on as well. No equine sport which has a prize at stake is without its bad characters who will throw their horse under the bus and its very sad to see.
                                      Last edited by wildlifer; Feb. 22, 2013, 08:39 PM. Reason: spellin
                                      Life doesn't have perfect footing.

                                      Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
                                      We Are Flying Solo

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Originally posted by Arab_Mare View Post
                                        Or is Endurance Riding one of the equestrian disciplines which doesn't need experience or skill, just horse? It just seems as though the integrity of the sport has declined, and now it's just about how good the horse is, not how good the rider is.
                                        Actually there are alot of equestrian sports where a majority of the people can't ride and aren't really "horsemen". But I can to say the few times I volunteered at rides to do P&R's I was amazed at how many people really were BAD riders.

                                        But for the most part, these people aren't going to do well in the sport long-term because the won't be able to keep their horse together and sound.

                                        It's a shame they are allowed to treat the Tevis like a pony ride, but at least now you DO have to have completed a certain number of miles before you can attempt it.

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          There are people who "catch-ride" for Tevis. They pay other endurance riders to use a Tevis ready horse and then jump on and head down the trail. Granted, like Kyzteke said, although you do have to have to have a certain number of endurance miles under your belt (LD does not count), this thrown together combo seems CRAZY to me!

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X