• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

How old is too old for endurance riding?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How old is too old for endurance riding?

    My next column will be about age. this topic has been on my back burner for a long time. The recent string of posts following Margie Engle's accident has moved it to the front burner for me, along with my swift approach to 60.

    I'm plan to interview the elder statesmen and women of our sport.

    I'd love to get your suggestions of people to interview, both well -known icons and everyday people in all riding disciplines.


    Also, endurance riding seems to be especially taxing and makes me wonder how old is too old to do an endurance ride?

    Thanks
    Jody

  • #2
    Originally posted by jody jaffe View Post
    My next column will be about age. this topic has been on my back burner for a long time. The recent string of posts following Margie Engle's accident has moved it to the front burner for me, along with my swift approach to 60.

    I'm plan to interview the elder statesmen and women of our sport.

    I'd love to get your suggestions of people to interview, both well -known icons and everyday people in all riding disciplines.


    Also, endurance riding seems to be especially taxing and makes me wonder how old is too old to do an endurance ride?

    Thanks
    Jody
    I would say you're too old when you no longer can sit a horse.

    That said, time marches on for all of us and you'll not do at 60 what you used to do at 20 (or 30 or 40 or etc.). That march can be a a different rate for different people so don't judge your situation by that of your neighbor.

    Endurance takes time in the saddle. How long can you sit a horse without pain? How long can you sit a horse in a correct seat so you don't cause your horse pain? That's going to be your dual limit.

    So, look in the mirror and get your answers.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

    Comment


    • #3
      peope "age" at such different rates that the question is kind of nonsensical. Some oldsters are fitter and spunkier than some teenagers.
      Also, I would think endurance riding is more suited to the elderly than many other sports? as long as someone is willing to help heave you into the saddle, you can probably continue doing endurance long after you're able to do, say, eventing or barrel racing.

      Comment


      • #4
        My first endurance ride was a tough limited distance. I ended up following an awesome 72-year-old woman, who was tough as nails, kept the pace up, never faltered. I am indebted to her!

        At my most recent ride Julie Suhr was there. She is royalty in the endurance world She rode the LD I think, and must be about 80-years-old.

        My neighbor is 76 and still does endurance, and sweep rides for Tevis and the Western States run.

        I contrast them with my own 80-year-old grandmother, who has been pretty sedentary her whole life and walking around the block is an adventure.

        I think the mindset of endurance keeps people going: To finish is to win. You still need to move out at a pretty good pace, it's not a trail ride! I think many of the older riders have been doing it for so long that they're in good shape, they know how to take care of themselves and their horses. It is inspiring, and while I have a few years till I'm there, I hope I'm one of the "old ladies" on the trail!
        "Do your best, and leave the rest, twill all come right, some day or night" -Black Beauty

        http://trails-and-trials-with-major.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          I think Melissa Margetts is in her mid-50s. And she has completed Tevis several times. On an 18 year old Paso Fino.

          Comment


          • #6
            50's!!!!! You think that is old????? LOL

            Comment


            • #7
              Not at all -- that was my point to OP, who is apparently also in her fifties. Unless you have a health issue, ignore the candles, get a leg over and get out there!
              Last edited by BarbaricYawp; Jul. 12, 2012, 01:37 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ms. Sylvia from Arapahoe Hunt in Colorado! She's in her 80's (86yrs old I think) and she's still fox hunting. Her last name escapes me at the moment, but she is still out hunting at her age. Not running first flight, but goodness I hope I am as active as she is when I am in my 80's! There is an interview with her somewhere in the hunting section of COTH. I have met her and I was quite impressed. She's a great example of staying active in horses as you age.

                Bobbi Richine will be 70yrs old this year and she is still riding endurance. She's not doing Tevis anymore but still rides 2-3 endurance horses in the CO mountains.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My main riding partner is 72- she rides a spitfire of a little Morgan mare and while she doesn't compete, she does often do 4-5 hours in the saddle and it ain't at a sedate walk
                  I'm good at being uncomfortable so I can't stop changing all the time -Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine
                  If I were your appendages, I'd hold open your eyes so you would see- Incubus

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Julie Suhr is 88! She finished the Wild West 30 a few weeks ago. She sets the bar high!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You are too old when you start deciding what other's pace should be. Please just move out of the way and let the faster ones go by. Otherwise you are never too old.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Guilherme View Post
                        I would say you're too old when you no longer can sit a horse.
                        How long can you sit a horse without pain? How long can you sit a horse in a correct seat so you don't cause your horse pain? .
                        ^^^^this

                        It doesnt matter what sport, my aunt at 78 still runs 5k's, plays on a softball team,, white waters the Colorado river each year and hikes to town for stamps (4-5mi>one way!) oh yes, swim in the sr olympics....
                        Never too late to start a fitness program!
                        my dad at 83 plays golf and tennis, his wife at 78 plays golf and tennis with her gf's/
                        Melissa Margettes did her 3rd tevis buckle with 42 screws in one leg,-- she taught her horse, Cabo, to kneel for her to mount! Add age to injury and you have a hero!
                        IN GOD WE TRUST
                        OTTB's ready to show/event/jumpers. Track ponies for perfect trail partners.
                        http://www.horseville.com/php/search...=1&ssid=057680

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bells View Post
                          You are too old when you start deciding what other's pace should be. Please just move out of the way and let the faster ones go by. Otherwise you are never too old.


                          This could be said for driving a car too!

                          You are never too old until your body tells you otherwise. I applaud those who continue to do the things they love despite the fact that others their age gave up those things because they felt they were too old for that anymore.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Jan Worthington is 72 and is a ranked alternate (#10 out of 14) for the 2012 Olympics for Gawd's sake! She was also on the US team at WEG in 2010 - oldest competitor there - and rode in some championship in Malaysia a few years ago in which she was literally hit by lightning and may have actually finished the ride. (Her Olympic horse is named Golden Lightning, BTW). IMO if you look up "tough" in the dictionary you should see Jan's picture right there. Here's a link to learn more: [URL="[URL="http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/2010-09-22-worthington-equestrian-games_N.htm"]"]
                            Few of us will ever be a Jan but there are many riders in their 50s, 60s and up who still compete in endurance. Retirement age riders have the time to condition and go to rides that younger working riders might not have. You should have no trouble finding "seasoned" people riding at all levels of endurance... Good luck!
                            Last edited by GotMyPony; Jul. 12, 2012, 05:59 PM. Reason: Trying to fix the darn link!
                            It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Once more on the link for Jan Worthington story: http://http://www.usatoday.com/sport...an-games_N.htm

                              If this doesn't work, google "Endurance Rider Worthington Still Champing at the Bit" from USA Today. Sorry!
                              It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Jan Worthington is 72 and is a ranked alternate (#10 out of 14) for the 2012 Olympics
                                Not quite the Olympics "Just" the WEC - World Endurance Championships...
                                But I wish Endurance would become an Olympic discipline!

                                And, yes, Jan is great. You should definitely interview her.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Jody,
                                  Because you are in Virginia you might like to interview a couple of the long time Old Dominion members/riders. This June Dr. Jeannie Waldron (66?) won the Old Dominion 100, her horse was also awarded the the Old Dominion Trophy which is awarded to the horse judged to be in best condition on Sunday morning, hours after the ride is finished. Bob Walsh, my neighbor and past OD president finished the OD 100 again. Bob is just a couple years younger than Jeannie. Leon Stagg Newman (who knew his first name is Leon?!?), past AERC President, is 64 and competing in 100 mile rides all over the country mile ride.

                                  I'm sure that any of these people would be happy to talk with you and suggest other senior riders to interview. If you want I can put you in touch with Bob Walsh who can give you names and contacts for many riders.

                                  Bonnie

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Jody - Take Bonnie up on her offer. She can put you in touch with a good selection of the gray haired competitors in endurance.

                                    If you contact Endurance News they can probably direct you to some of the top active 70+ year olds out in the west region (which has a higher percentage of endurance riders in the US).

                                    Surprisingly, Endurance is second only to foxhunting in having higher aged riders actively involved in competition. (Foxhunting is actually 'play', not competition)

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      These are the people I admire - people still loving life and what they do - and their horses. Their stories are an inspiration and the riders role models.
                                      Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Granted, this is not a sport of endurance, but no less awesome...

                                        http://www.courierpress.com/news/201...-ev_oldjockey/

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X