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Need a bit suggestion

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  • Need a bit suggestion

    My older (18 yrs) arab is very hot headed and somewhat hard to control. I've alway riden her in a snaffle.

    She needs something to move up to, training isn't the issue, this is just one hot horse that wants to go and pulls your arms out. There really isn't any stopping her if she gets a fast gallop going. One rein stops are my friend.

    Anyways, I don't want to hear "train, get her soft in the bridle, use just a snaffle. It won't work. I've had her 18 yrs and she is a hot mess.

    So- I need something strong, however she is small and has a delicate face/ muzzle so I want something not overpowering her head.

    Any ideas? Hackamores work good, but seems so big. The little S hacks are not strong enough.

  • #2
    Mylar combination bit? It has a rope over the nose and a bit, I think a rope under the chin as well, and at least three positions for rein options. Can be ridden as more of a shanked bit in one position, and more of a direct rein snaffle in another position.

    It gives the horse the opportunity to repond to the first level of pressure, and then adds more if needed.

    I do not know much about bits (I use an S Hack) so please forgive my manner of explanation. I was given a very good description of this bit and what it does by the Toklat Sales Manager, which is the only reason I can post this!

    Comment


    • #3
      If the training is there and you just need to "access" it then use an appropriate curb. I know it makes the purists cringe, but a curb is also a good bit for putting the "whoa mule" on a horse that has too much go.

      If the horse does not have a good foundation then the curb will still work, it's just that you're "papering over" a big "training hole." That can work (and maybe with an aged horse like this is the most practical solution) but hole is still there and someday you might fall into it.

      Good luck in your project.

      G.
      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

      Comment


      • #4
        When I first got to know a person who is now a good friend, she had recently bought her first horse and decided after a few months to buy the horse a farm to live on. Yes, single woman with her first "child". Of course she now owns three horses, all of them OTTBs. Anyway, she was the proud owner of a very successful ex-race horse. And of course her instructor had told her that she must be able to ride this horse in a snaffle or she just wasn't a good rider.

        What hogwash! she simply wanted to trail ride and be enough in control to trot and canter. I talked her into trying a little short shanked pelham bit with the non-jointed mullen mouth piece. I had learned while teaching kids to ride that a non-jointed bit, like a kimberwicke or pelham was quite the favorite with the horses, they are much happier with that gently curved solid mouth piece and riders actually had a bit more control and ability to lower the horses's heads. worked especially well once outside of the ring where even the sedatest school horse could get some real energy,

        Anyway, the little pelham works a treat, gives more control, lowers the horses head carriage (which is a plus for many horses) and the horses typically really do well in the mullen mouth. You don't have to use two reins, you can use bit equalizers which allow you to use a single rein or simply use a single rein on the curb ring.

        Bonnie

        Comment


        • #5
          I really like the pelham for my Tb too. It gives me more control but it doesnt upset him either like some other bits I've tried.
          When I used to event, I used a "bubble bit" on him (i think it is called a Pessoa too, the one with 3 rings) and that worked well too.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm with the others...you need a curb rein for when her brain leaves the building.

            I like this bit, it's quiet in their mouths, allows independant direct reining on each side (shanks swivel via copper thingie in the middle of the mouth piece). and you can either ride it with two sets of reins, or one on just the shank ring. Coupled with a leather curb strap, you aren't upsetting her but you can get a hold and HELLO to her if need be.

            Google Imus Comfort Gait bit...about 70 bucks so a titch cheaper than Mylers but a well made bit. Disregard the 'gaited' inference, that's called marketing

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a very hot horse also who loves to burn up the trail but she goes bitless. She tried pulling my arms out of the sockets maybe twice, but I put her on a circle and worked her butt into the ground for 5 minutes, then proceeded on. She got the idea real quick that reefing on the reins earns her even harder work. But anyway, you could try a Myler curb bit. This is what one of my trail riding friends did for her 25 year old super incredibly hot and reactive - pulling your arms out Arab cross mare. It helped CONSIDERABLY. You couldn't ride the mare in a snaffle. When she got tired of pulling your arms out of the sockets she would spin instead. Now in the curb bit she is much better behaved.

              I've also heard very good things about the Myler combination bit.

              Comment


              • #8
                So far as the "imus" bit... I know of more than 2 people that had these bits fall apart.

                You can get the same bit in a Robart pinchless from Metalab.

                However, I find single jointed bits to be nasty - unless they are the pinchless type ... they fold and poke and pinch and I believe that affects the horse adversely.

                However. If she works well in a hackamore .. you might consider a barrel-racing bit. If you really consider how those horses are ridden... the BR bits allow the rider to "rate" (slow down/stop) the horse when needed to control the turn. The mouth piece can be nearly anything, but what helps the most is the rawhide, rope, or cable piece that works as the hackamore portion while the bit is of the gag type.
                http://www.tackstop.com/circleyoring.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  Really? ugh- good to know. Of course you can't ask about that on GoG they'd ban you for sure, LOL!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There are a lot of "cowboy pelhams" with little copper rollers on them that pretty much duplicate the Imus bit at a third of the cost. Another gaited trick might be to get a short shanked walking horse bit. You cant get interchangeable shanks and mouthpieces, copper or not, with and without rollers, mullen mouth, low to high ports and on and on. And the short shanks are REAL short, giving no more leverage than the lower slot on a Kimberwick. I like the Kimberwick for energetic horses, too. Its hard to hurt a horse with one but you can get their attention.

                    My lovely soft mouthed perfect gentleman TWH goes best in a Kimberwick or an Imus or an Imus wannabe bit. He loves to go, go go, and he loves having some kind of roller to play with. (He's hazardous with the interchangeable walking horse bits because he'll fool around with them until they come unscrewed and he spits bit pieces all over the landscape.) With a Big Heavy Solid Shanked Bit he just holds it lightly in his mouth and neck reins and whoa's with the lightest finger pressure. He loathes broken mouth snaffles.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Most of the Walker bits sold are of questionable quality and have a high propensity to pinch the corners of the mouth. If you look at a large Walker trail ride you'll lots lots of those round, red-rubber "bit guards."

                      I'm not much of a fan of Imus on anything, so we'll leave it at that.

                      I've been riding in a Myler Pelham with a low port mouthpiece for a couple of years now and find it to be a very functional bit. I ride with four reins a lot and that gives some flexibility (stay on the snaffle 'till you need the curb, use it, and then back off if you get the response you want). Someday I'll give a double bridle a try just to see how that will work out.

                      G.
                      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        agreed: I have a few mouthpieces and interchangeable shanks- hate 'em. Heavy, often unbalanced (quality question), etc...and those dreaded bit guards.

                        Imus is a PITA as a vendor -prima donna extraordinaire, she is: but I do like that darn bit! One of my walkers loves it, the other hates it, and a friend's paint likes it so much he reaches for it, unlike any thing else she'd tried on him

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here's a link to some of the Robart Pinchless. the one at the top left is what was copied by GOG.

                          http://www.pinchlessbits.com/

                          and... if you go to western bits... to the "short shank snaffle" ... this is the most marvelous bit for transitioning from plain snaffle (the d's on the bit) to a shanked bit. This is a pinchless bit. No pinching or binding or jabbing or nutcrackering.

                          However, I believe the OP is looking for something with a little more control, yes? and she said a hackamore works ....
                          so rather than go to a western shanked bit, she could go to a kimberwicke (jointed or solid) or combination hackamore w/bit.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            http://www.horse-rider-etc.com/tack/bits/mylerbits.html

                            you can rent various bits from these folks and try them out before buying

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by wendy View Post
                              http://www.horse-rider-etc.com/tack/bits/mylerbits.html

                              you can rent various bits from these folks and try them out before buying
                              SUPER IDEA!!!

                              G.
                              Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Diamond Jake View Post
                                Mylar combination bit? It has a rope over the nose and a bit, I think a rope under the chin as well, and at least three positions for rein options. Can be ridden as more of a shanked bit in one position, and more of a direct rein snaffle in another position.

                                It gives the horse the opportunity to repond to the first level of pressure, and then adds more if needed.
                                I absolutely love my Myler Combination bit and never use anything but. There is actually a loose curb strap under the chin and a raw hide type of nose band. A bit pricey, but well worth it.
                                MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
                                http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

                                Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Narrowed down to 3 bits...

                                  So I've narrowed my bit search to 3 bits.

                                  A. TTeam Roller bit http://tteamforendurance.com/TTEAMequipment.aspx
                                  B. Brenda Imus Gaits of Gold bit http://www.gaitsofgold.net/component...er/Itemid,217/
                                  C. Robart pinchless bit http://www.pinchlessbits.com/ (bit in the top left corner)

                                  What are the major differences in these bits? I am struggling here. I also would like to use the same bit on another green horse that needs more woah also (training too, but I will get there eventually.)

                                  Help me please. Every single bit sounds fantastic, marketing is very good and they seem like they will "cure all."

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    That is an awfully long shank on the TTeam bit.... you would do your horse justice by getting a smaller shank... grazing style...
                                    Kim
                                    The Galloping Grape
                                    Warrenton, VA
                                    http://www.GallopingGrape.com

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by IrishKharma View Post
                                      So I've narrowed my bit search to 3 bits.

                                      A. TTeam Roller bit http://tteamforendurance.com/TTEAMequipment.aspx
                                      B. Brenda Imus Gaits of Gold bit http://www.gaitsofgold.net/component...er/Itemid,217/
                                      C. Robart pinchless bit http://www.pinchlessbits.com/ (bit in the top left corner)

                                      What are the major differences in these bits? I am struggling here. I also would like to use the same bit on another green horse that needs more woah also (training too, but I will get there eventually.)

                                      Help me please. Every single bit sounds fantastic, marketing is very good and they seem like they will "cure all."
                                      A. TTeam looks to be just a long shanked, medium-high port Western bit. If you want to use this type of bit (and it works for your discipline) then the only question is the quality of construction.

                                      B. There have been lots of comments on the poor quality of Imus products. I'd want to have it in my hands for examination before I parted with any jack.

                                      C. This one looks like a Tom Thumb with a small roller. I'm not a "Tom Thumb Nazi" but I don't use them, either.

                                      Why not use a standard double bridle? It's been around since dirt, there's lots of information on its correct use, many instructors and trainers are familiar with it, and you are not getting a "pig in a poke."
                                      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Guilherme View Post
                                        C. This one looks like a Tom Thumb with a small roller. I'm not a "Tom Thumb Nazi" but I don't use them, either.
                                        The difference between THIS bit and TThumb is that this is a pinchless bit that will NOT nutcracker the horse's face. Each shank moves independently of the other side - hence if you apply rein to one side, you are not jerking on the other side of the horse's face/mouth.

                                        I've worked for a large tack retailer at horse expos and the store's owner trusts me on the "bit wall" and selling saddles. I've had many people bring other bits to me and then try this one.

                                        However, this bit extends out beyond the what would be considered a "bit seat". It makes the horse reach for it - which is a good thing for gaited horses.

                                        A better choice from Robart, for non gaited horses is what they call The Reiner... not so much forward on the tongue. Again, each side works independently from the other. Allows the use of direct rein contact.

                                        When considering a shanked bit, the more straight the shanks are, the more control there is. The more swept back the shanks are, the less "severe"... a true "grazing bit" is one with swept back shanks (allows a horse to put their head down and graze while the bit is in the mouth. bits with straight shanks - the shanks poke into the ground and the horse has more difficulty grazing)...

                                        Comment

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