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lost faith in easyboots

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  • lost faith in easyboots

    i have been using easyboot bares for a couple years now and have loved the freedom of hoof protection only when needed. i also love not being dependent on my farrier. i ride a lot of hard packed dirt roads and feel comfortable moving out w/ out fear of concussion problems.

    unfortunately i had an incident and have lost faith. my horse and i ended up in deep mud while avoiding a car. she became nervous and we started out of the mud. she ended up leaping out and then rearing and taking off at a gallop. all of it is highly unusual for her. she is very experienced and is fine in mud. the car stopped quite aways from us so don't believe that was the issue.

    two easy boot bares were torn off. these had new gaiters. i think they collected the mud and made it hard for her to move. i wonder if she reared and bolted because they were flopping against her legs? the only other time she half bolted was when a boot tore away from a gaiter (my fault as i knew it was starting to tear)

    so now i don't know what i'm going to do. i will have a fear of mud for sure. i have ridden since age 10...now 40, and this was first major injury. i don't bounce so well anymore i have a broken wrist and mushed face so have a few weeks before i have to decide anything. might need surgery which will delay it even further. i'll probably have to do shoes for awhile just because of pain issues.

    any similar occurences? thanks for letting me vent

  • #2
    Get Epics instead. The more I use the Bares the more I think they are a crappy design. You can NOT get them tight enough. I have lost the Bares in mud too but never lost an Epic. When I take the Epics off, they are clean and dry inside. When I take off the Bares, they are FULL of rocks and mud. So much that I have to scrape them out with a hoof pick and a garden hose. It's ridiculous. I won't be recommending Bares to anyone unless they ride on perfectly flat, smooth dry land. Epics on the otherhand I have NEVER had these issues with!
    Last edited by Auventera Two; May. 13, 2008, 10:58 AM. Reason: spelling

    Comment


    • #3
      We tried EasyBoots 15 years ago and found them wanting in many respects.

      First, each Boot had to fitted to each foot or you got REALLY bad "heel galls."

      Second, they were the Devil's Own Business to get on and off. A screwdriver was an absolute must.

      Third, they were highly unsuitable in many of our local riding venues. We get just short of 60" of rain per year in our valley (we are the third wettest place in North America, after a couple of locales in the PNW). This means lots of water crossings and lots of mud. The Boots would quickly fill with water. Even when we drilled "drain holes" in them they retained enough to give a hoof a good soaking over time. As noted, mud can pull one or more off even when properly applied.

      In the fall, our dry season, they tended to fill up with dirt, rock dust, and debris resulting in a "sandpaper" effect on the hoof.

      We really didn't use them long enough to comment on their durability, but when we're working hard we wear out a set of iron shoes in about five weeks. AFAIK rubber is not more wear resistant than iron.

      We abandoned the trial and have not tried other brands. I've looked at other offerings at some of the large "equine marketplaces" that spring up from time to time and have found the same fundamental design flaws in every model I've looked at. Some were clearly better engineered than others, but none would be suitable for our use.

      So we stick with traditional shoeing. It's what our horses need for the uses we make of them.

      G.
      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

      Comment


      • #4
        As for wear and durability - shoes are on a horse 24/7. Boots are on for the few hours you ride and then they're off. In my experience, boots FAR outlast shoes. I have a couple sets of boots that are on their second full season of wear.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by winona View Post
          i have been using easyboot bares for a couple years now and have loved the freedom of hoof protection only when needed. i also love not being dependent on my farrier. i ride a lot of hard packed dirt roads and feel comfortable moving out w/ out fear of concussion problems.

          unfortunately i had an incident and have lost faith. my horse and i ended up in deep mud while avoiding a car. she became nervous and we started out of the mud. she ended up leaping out and then rearing and taking off at a gallop. all of it is highly unusual for her. she is very experienced and is fine in mud. the car stopped quite aways from us so don't believe that was the issue.

          two easy boot bares were torn off. these had new gaiters. i think they collected the mud and made it hard for her to move. i wonder if she reared and bolted because they were flopping against her legs? the only other time she half bolted was when a boot tore away from a gaiter (my fault as i knew it was starting to tear)

          so now i don't know what i'm going to do. i will have a fear of mud for sure. i have ridden since age 10...now 40, and this was first major injury. i don't bounce so well anymore i have a broken wrist and mushed face so have a few weeks before i have to decide anything. might need surgery which will delay it even further. i'll probably have to do shoes for awhile just because of pain issues.

          any similar occurences? thanks for letting me vent
          Correct thinking. Sometimes it takes injuries and pain to overcome foolishness. Lesson well learned. Get your horse shod
          George

          Comment


          • #6
            Foolishness?

            Would it be fair to say that shoeing is pure foolishness because those Easywalker shoes have done a lot of damage to horses with their extreme flexibility? Or those Cytek iron shoes with their huge nail holes and inability to shape them?

            The Bares are ONE DESIGN of hoof boot, and ONE DESIGN only. If that ONE DESIGN does not meet your needs and fails to perform adequately in your situation, then you can either try a DIFFERENT DESIGN, or you can pursue other options, including shoeing.

            It's really that simple and not fair at all to imply that those of us who use hoof boots are fools. It's no more fair than saying that those who shoe horses are fools based on the disasterous results of Easywalker or Cytek, or whatever other design you can think of that's caused problems. Grow up George and try to converse objectively. The attacks by you farriers here on the intelligence of others is REALLY getting sickening. [edit] Sheesh.
            Last edited by Moderator 1; May. 13, 2008, 12:28 PM. Reason: language

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Auventera Two View Post
              Foolishness?

              Would it be fair to say that shoeing is pure foolishness because those Easywalker shoes have done a lot of damage to horses with their extreme flexibility? Or those Cytek iron shoes with their huge nail holes and inability to shape them?
              My opinions on fad shoeing, junk science and trash products is pretty well known. Check some of the stuff I've said about plastic shoes and natural bs.
              [QUOTE]

              [edit]

              The OP is smartening up. She sees shoeing as being in the best interest of her horse. [edit].
              George
              Last edited by Moderator 1; May. 13, 2008, 01:00 PM. Reason: quote of edited material/personal commentary

              Comment


              • #8
                can't lose what I never had

                Comment


                • #9
                  Shoes - no shoes - boots - no boots.....it's a decision that each owner makes for each horse on an individual basis. PERIOD. I can NOT for the life of me figure out why people have to turn it into a fight with name calling. This horse owner can try other boots if she wants, or she can go back to shoes. It's really NOT a dramatic situation.

                  I cannot understand the need for "BUA compatriots and foolishness" talk. It's just a decision to make. That's it. And whatever she decides I'm sure will be just fine for her situation.

                  Why is it that anytime someone makes a different decision than you do, they are a fool/uneducated/idiot/BUA, etc. But if they choose shoes they are "smarter." Nobody is smarter or stupider than anyone else. Everybody just makes a decision based on the info they have, and their situation, coupled with their individual views. Doesn't make me stupid, and doesn't make you smart, or vice versa. It's just a different way of doing things fergodsake.

                  I wish the moderators could pare this crap out of these boards. It completely ruins the forums.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm sorry that you got hurt and hope you heal up okay.

                    I've never tried Bares but am using Epics and Renegades for almost a year now. Where I live, there is never much mud, so I cant really speak to that. The boots are working well overall but shoeing is most definitely easier. I have NEVER had a horse lose a shoe and all I had to do was schedule and pay the farrier.

                    Like I said, my boot experience overall has been good and I feel good that my horses' feet look much better, but there are definitely hassles involved. For both the Renegades and the Epics, I get only so much use until something on them breaks and I have to get them fixed. I've also had equipment failure on the trail which stinks too. It doesnt happen often but of course always seems to happen at the worse possible times! I have not been able to get to many endurance rides this year but I will see how I feel about the boots when I am doing a lot of rides, hopefully soon.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As per the previous post, everyone please return to the original topic. You're all welcome to provide your different opinions on solutions to the OP's experience, but do not engage in general redundant battles in the middle of threads.

                      Hit an alert if you feel commentary is inappropriate.

                      Thanks,
                      Mod 1

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        FYI - Ive seen shoes get pulled (no, RIPPED off) off in mud too.

                        I like the Old Mac G2. they are only like $40 more than the Epics. and they fit the horse better, provide better traction, and are much more user friendly.

                        valleyvet is the best place to get them.

                        good luck

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Certainly mud can suck off a shoe. But I've never had TN mud suck a shoe off any of our horses. Not so with EasyBoots.

                          Like I say in OUR environment (very wet for six months, wet for three, dry for three) they just don't work anywhere off well prepared surfaces. Since we go on a lot of unprepared surfaces they are seriously wanting for us. YMMV.

                          As to the other brands I still see serious deficiencies for our area and use. Again, YMMV.

                          G.
                          Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Guilherme View Post
                            Certainly mud can suck off a shoe.
                            G.
                            How can mud suck a shoe off??? There is little for the mud to get a hold of with a shoe?? Could it not be that the foot was slowed down enough that the shoe was stepped off???

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              i'm sorry that this thread turned into another battle re:boots vs. shoes. i take offense to being called "foolish and stupid". i have loved boot use before this and will keep using them to some degree. i won't have much choice for awhile since i'm one-handed and won't know how painful my wrist will be even once healed. also farriers, esp. good ones are very hard to find around here.

                              A.T.--thanks for the input on the epics as i've never tried them.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Hay

                                I've been using the Easyboot Epics however they do seem to wear a bit quick. I've had mine a year and will be replacing shortly. I had bought the Old Macs many years ago and that first pair lasted me almost 5 years!!! When I replaced with the new Old Macs, apparently made in China, the sole was so hard that it made the bottom very slippery. We would slip on any sort of slick rock whereas the previous pair of Old Macs, the sole was softer, had a great grip.

                                Again, I am now in Easyboot Epics and while they wear a bit quicker, I like the grip on the bottom and have not had anything come off while in mud. We're in the NE so we're pretty muddy here too.

                                Thanks for the info on the Easyboot Bares. I was going to try but now, I'll replace with Epics. GOod luck with your horse!
                                Sorry! But that barn smell is my aromatherapy!
                                One of our horsey bumper stickers! www.horsehollowpress.com
                                Add Very Funny Horse Bumper Stickers on facebook

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Winona - Shoeing might be the better option for you if you're one handed , at least until you see how you heal up. Ouch, sorry to hear that. If you can put boots on with one hand then you deserve a special paid holiday. They're hard to get on with two good hands. If you do decide to try Epics, or some other type, they're easier to get on than Bares. Of all of them, I think Bares are the most difficult to get on.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by winona View Post

                                    two easy boot bares were torn off. these had new gaiters. any similar occurences? thanks for letting me vent
                                    yep...which is why we don't use them

                                    best
                                    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                                    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      [QUOTE]
                                      Originally posted by Shadow14 View Post
                                      How can mud suck a shoe off??? There is little for the mud to get a hold of with a shoe?? QUOTE]
                                      very deep red clay mud can form an adhesion to the hoof and loose nails on shoes are made looser by the mud...complicated in that is actual turnout in red clay mud as well as riding in same...to "suck a shoe" is a fairly common thing...

                                      best
                                      Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                                      I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I've had my Epics (same pair) for 2 years. I live in the Mtns. of western NC and used them pretty often. (not always same horse).

                                        I have ZERO complaints about the Epics. I did purcase a pair of Bares and immediately tossed them on ebay. They were so hard to put on and didn't fit as well as the Epics.

                                        We do, on average 15 miles per weekend day of riding. Sometime up to 30. They have gone thru mud bogs, jumps, rivers, red clay, you name it - and the worst that has happened has the metal clip flipped up (boots stayed on).

                                        I wouldn't give up on the boots just yet. If you aren't riding, then maint. trims are all you horse should need. If you invested this much time and interest in your horses welfare, no need to shoe while the horse is on a break

                                        There is no telling what caused your horse to get upset, could have stepped on something sharp in the mud, could have gotten stung, really no telling.

                                        I hope you get to feeling better soon.
                                        All horses can go barefoot, but not all owners can - words of wisdom!

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