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Tucker Saddles/Gel Cush Seats

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  • Tucker Saddles/Gel Cush Seats

    Wow, I tried making this thread and when I hit post, it added it to a really old post. Wierd...

    Anyways, due to an autoimmune disease I haven't been able to ride since Aug 2007. I've been trying to find a way so I can ride at least a couple days a week. I'm wondering if the Gel Cush seat and Tucker saddles may be the answer.

    I'm a dressage rider, so I would want a saddle that would put me in as close to a dressage position as possible. I was thinking of trying the Equitation Endurance. Does anyone have any experience with these saddle? Comments? Opinions? Any info would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    A friend of mine just recently got one and loves it.I have not tried hers, but have ridden in a friend's plantation model Tucker. It was really comfortable, but I think positions you more for riding a gaited horse. I have a TB mare and when I can afford it will probably purchase an Equitation Endurance.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've noticed that the Tuckers are really heavy saddles, but I'm used to treeless saddles so most saddles seem heavy to me. What are your needs now due to your illness? You want something that feels like a dressage saddle. Are you needing a more secure saddle with a really soft seat? Take a look at the Sensaton Hybrid http://www.kaarenjordan.com/SensationHybridSaddle.html

      They have reallt soft, comfy seats, extra secure, adjustable stirrup positioning and treeless so they will adapt to numerous horses. The pictures show a hard use attachment for the stirrups but you don't have to use it and can simply hang regular leathers. they also make a couple of dressage models and more.

      Bonnie S.

      Comment


      • #4
        the tucker river plantation weighs 22 lbs.

        Comment


        • #5
          I had a Tucker Montreal Trooper Light (not sure if they make them anymore) that had the gel seat- super comfy and I think weighed under 20 lbs after I pulled the stirrups that came with it off and added regular english ones. I loved it!!! super comfy, could go all day in it, but alas, when I got hurt, I sold it to cover medical bills.... sigh
          "Can't shake the devil's hand and say you're only kidding"

          Comment


          • #6
            I have the Tucker EnduranceTrail, been using it for 6-7 years. Love it, love it, love it. My husband even bought one for himself after trying all the Tucker saddles.
            I'm a former SS rider and it was as close to English I could get with all the riggings. Plus weight was an issue as I am 5'2" and my main ride is nearly 17H.

            They come in 3 tree sizes, M, Wide and XWide. Endurance Trail weighs 22 pounds and the Equitation weighs 21.

            Also available are try-outs without having to buy.

            Mary

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by chicamuxen1 View Post
              I've noticed that the Tuckers are really heavy saddles, but I'm used to treeless saddles so most saddles seem heavy to me.
              I noticed that too about them. I got my hands on a few at the tack store and thought they felt as heavy as a big western working saddle. The tack store lady told me they run around 30 pounds without any fittings. Yikes. Way too heavy for me. I suppose there are lighter models of the Tuckers, but if there are, she didn't carry them. I'd have been more interested in them if they weren't so darned heavy. One other thing she told me is that they either fit perfect, or they don't fit at all and there is no creative padding options to help. This lady is also a saddle fitter and said that Tuckers can sore a horse's back terribly if you don't make sure they fit EXACTLY. I don't recall the reasons she gave for this, but I imagine something with the tree design? In any case, she told me that she wouldn't feel comfortable selling a person a Tucker unless they brought their horse down to the shop and she made sure it fit well. Of course you really should do this with ANY saddle, but apparently the Tuckers are less forgiving. I don't know, but I just chose not to pursue that brand.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm a dressage and trail rider, who up until this last year rode out on trail in a dressage saddle. I've just spent the last 6 months trying to decide on a new trail saddle for my horse. Once I determined that a Tucker was the saddle I wanted -- I had to figure out which one. I really was leaning towards the Equitation Endurance, because of it's look and english rigging (I wanted to keep my Sprengers!). Twice we made a pilgrimage to a tack shop that carried the full line of Tuckers and spent over an hour trying every one, multiple times. Twice I walked away thinking I liked the deep seat of the Tucker Plantation saddle better than the Equitation Endurance or Endurance saddles.

                Two weekends ago I finally broke down and bought a Tucker Plantation (I got the western rigging in the end because I didn't want to wait, but it can be ordered with English). I've ridden in our ring with it, and this past weekend took it on a three hour trail ride. I LOVE IT. I have to say I just really felt at home in it. And the gel pad really is comfy. And my horse loved it. Yes, it is heavier than my dressage saddles -- but it's definately lighter than the Circle Y we have and I love the fact that there are no "skirts". My guy is 15'3" and it wasn't hard for me to carry or tack him. In all the research I did I never heard that the tree was any less "forgiving" than any other western type saddle tree. But it is always advisable with any saddle that you test the fit out on your horse!

                DancingAppy -- I really strongly suggest you try sitting in a few of their saddles, or borrow a Tucker from someone if you can to see how your horse likes the tree and you like the feel. Valley Vet also has a demo program -- if you don't have anyplace near you. Best of luck!
                "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." - Confucious
                <>< I.I.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Yes, I need a super padded seat to minimize damage to the soft tissues. Right now it's just an idea, I am going to be purchasing a cart and harness soon so there goes my excess money for a while.

                  I looked at the Plantation but I read a thread on her that it can put you in a chair seat?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you get lazy and push on those big padded stirrups it comes with, that big cushy seat has the room to allow you to get in a poor position. BUTT- the skinny pliable leathers also let you get back to where you once belonged

                    http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/4...108AZN2TRm4Yt9

                    http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/4...108AZN2TRm4Yt9

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ever considered an Aussie? I grew up in Dressage saddles, and I was quite surprised how similar my aussie feels to the Dressage saddles I used to ride in. They're also a lot lighter than most western saddles, which is a big plus.
                      Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey sublime - I just bought an assuie. REalllllllly did not want to do it, but with good feed, less work, cold weather, and gusting winds, my horse is a bottle rocket. I don't feel secure enough in the treeless right now on her. I hope I like the saddle, but also hope it's only temporary until the temps warm up and the horse gets the winter pipes blown out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Auventera Two View Post
                          Hey sublime - I just bought an assuie. REalllllllly did not want to do it, but with good feed, less work, cold weather, and gusting winds, my horse is a bottle rocket. I don't feel secure enough in the treeless right now on her. I hope I like the saddle, but also hope it's only temporary until the temps warm up and the horse gets the winter pipes blown out.
                          Well I'm sorry about the conditions you bought it, but I am excited you decided on an aussie! What kind did you get, and were you able to find the correct tree size? I know the wider breeds, including Arabs, can be harder to fit in Aussie saddles. I had very little to pick from when fitting one to my massive QH, but I love mine through and through.
                          Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am also considering an aussie as a lighter alternative to a Tucker- maybe less money also. Anyone reveal which brand works for you ,which to stay away from? I am particularly interested in one that fits a TB.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SouthwestRerider View Post
                              I am also considering an aussie as a lighter alternative to a Tucker- maybe less money also. Anyone reveal which brand works for you ,which to stay away from? I am particularly interested in one that fits a TB.
                              Fitting a TB in an aussie will be EASY! They're mostly made for high-withered, spiney, rangey horses. So you will have lots to choose from.

                              Depending on your price range, Toowoomba and Syd Hill saddles are probably the top of the line aussies, but quite expensive and usually well over $1,000. After that, I'd probably say the Down Under collection is a good mid-range saddle. Then after that, I like Kimberley saddles (also made by Down Under), and my saddle is a Sydney Saddleworks, that is surprisingly good quality for the price ($300 or so, new).

                              As for which to stay away from; most of the Aussies on eBay are very risky. I got mine on eBay, but I did a ton of research beforehand on the brand. There's a brand called Outback Saddlery that I see on eBay a lot, and haven't heard very good things about.. and if they don't bother telling you the brand name, or there is none, BEWARE!
                              Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I have been riding in Tuckers for a few years now. Great saddles, great company. Haven't ridden in the new gel seat ones, but the old ones are very comfy. Definalty not a heavy saddle at all, the western models are as light or lighter than comparable western saddle and allthe endurance and plantation models are under 25 pounds. Valley Vet has Tuckers on a trial rental program.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Sublime - I don't know what brand it is. I'll try to get pictures of it to post. It looks really nice and seems nice and balanced with good quality leather but who knows??? I don't intend to use it much as I really don't care for the saddles, but I'm anticipating having to ride some snorts and blows and tantrums so the treeless isn't giving me a warm fuzzy at the moment. The Arab has been off for over a month due to all sorts of circumstances. I've been riding the QH and Libbey instead. I've been having some hip problems I am not sure I could stick on even in my Abetta. The best diagnosis I could get was microtears in the flexor muscles or some such thing?? From what else but riding in a treeless saddle?! The physical therapist guesses that I did the damage by riding too much too quick in the treeless when my body wasn't conditioned to use those types of muscles. I did a lot of riding back in the winter, including sticking on through some rather dramatic aires above the ground when a Mini (horse!) popped out of the woods. I'd slide down after a ride and it hurt to walk. It's better now but I still have pain. Anyway, I hope the aussie can save my bacon while I get this springtime nut legged up again.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Renae View Post
                                    I have been riding in Tuckers for a few years now. Great saddles, great company. Haven't ridden in the new gel seat ones, but the old ones are very comfy. Definalty not a heavy saddle at all, the western models are as light or lighter than comparable western saddle and allthe endurance and plantation models are under 25 pounds. Valley Vet has Tuckers on a trial rental program.
                                    I have a Tucker High Plains western saddle, 2003 model. I use it for starting my young horses under saddle and also for trail riding. It does have the gel seat. I ordered mine with a suede seat and round skirts. Very comfy and very secure. It weighs right at 25 lbs with the extras I have on it (breast collar, tail crupper, back cinch). I wouldn't think you endurance riders would want all that gear, nor would you likely want the saddle horn. But some of the other Tucker models would probably suit. This saddle replaced the old roping saddle I rode in for many years. Now that was a heavy saddle- around 40 lbs.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I love my Tucker Eq/End, but now after getting my new english saddle, I do notice that my Tucker tips me back just a bit. Chair seat, they call it?

                                      I have never... (and that is a strong word considering how hard my horse is to fit) had a saddle fit him as well as they Tucker, so I am lucky. Comfy and light for me, too. But I will have to see what I think of it after riding this year in the english as well.

                                      So what I am trying to say is, if you like the position a Dressage saddle puts you in, try to ride in someone's Tucker first, on your horse even, to see if you like the position.

                                      It is nice to hear more people on here who have and love their Tucker Eq/End saddles. I am the only one I know in my MN Endurance group who rides in one.

                                      Glad to hear you are getting back into the saddle again!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Auventera Two View Post
                                        Sublime - I don't know what brand it is. I'll try to get pictures of it to post. It looks really nice and seems nice and balanced with good quality leather but who knows??? I don't intend to use it much as I really don't care for the saddles, but I'm anticipating having to ride some snorts and blows and tantrums so the treeless isn't giving me a warm fuzzy at the moment. The Arab has been off for over a month due to all sorts of circumstances. I've been riding the QH and Libbey instead. I've been having some hip problems I am not sure I could stick on even in my Abetta. The best diagnosis I could get was microtears in the flexor muscles or some such thing?? From what else but riding in a treeless saddle?! The physical therapist guesses that I did the damage by riding too much too quick in the treeless when my body wasn't conditioned to use those types of muscles. I did a lot of riding back in the winter, including sticking on through some rather dramatic aires above the ground when a Mini (horse!) popped out of the woods. I'd slide down after a ride and it hurt to walk. It's better now but I still have pain. Anyway, I hope the aussie can save my bacon while I get this springtime nut legged up again.
                                        I'd love to see photos! I love to admire other folk's aussies, since I don't get to see them that often.

                                        I bet the aussie will help with you getting back into the saddle after the soreness, too. With the high cantle and the poleys, you can really relax and not have to strain to keep yourself in a correct position. It's really nice.
                                        Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                                        Comment

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