• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Need saddle suggestions-

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need saddle suggestions-

    After a 7 year lay off from horses following back surgery, I am returning, minus all my tack. Never had a synthetic saddle and think that due to weight, it is probably the best option for me. I am just trail riding, the horse I am looking to purchase is a stout 16H quarter mare.
    I must admit I am a bit overwhelmed with the brands and price ranges, can anyone give me some suggestions?

  • #2
    What breed of horse? what type of riding? Would you describe yourself as tall and thin? tall and "chunky", medium ht & thin or chunky, etc.

    And - are you looking for english-type or western? Endurance? aussie?

    I like the quality of Fabtron synthetics, but it depends on what type of saddle you are looking for.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by gabz View Post
      What breed of horse? 16H stout quarterhorse what type of riding? Trail Would you describe yourself as tall and thin? tall and "chunky", medium ht & thin or chunky, etc. Tall, 170lbs

      And - are you looking for english-type or western? Endurance? aussie? western, lots of trails here in the mountains so must suitable for all day rides

      I like the quality of Fabtron synthetics, but it depends on what type of saddle you are looking for.
      Thanks for your reply

      Comment


      • #4
        For a synthetic western saddle, I really like the Big Horn. They have different trees, so you might find one suitable for your horse. They are the better quality of the synthetics IMO. The fenders fit my 6'5" Fiance and my 5'5" self.
        http://community.webshots.com/user/snafflebitz

        "My Saddlebred can do anything your horse can do" Clique

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a "stout" QH and I found that the Crates brand, wide tree, fit him the best. The Crates; however, is a full leather, double skirted saddle. I believe it weighs about 26 pounds. I have a reining saddle but use it for trail... the reining saddles have more movement in the fenders. I also like the fact that the Crates brand with Steele trees have a flare to the bars at the front - freeing up the shoulders, and yet have a narrower seat than some other brands of saddles.

          here's a link to their site. http://www.cratesleather.com/pages/s...pleasure.shtml

          However, I would consider a Fabtron saddle... if I absolutely had to have a synthetic. Look for the Steele brand tree... they will be better suited to a "stout" ( QH.

          Big Horn is another good name in synthetics... They have a huge variety so it would be hard for me to say which one might suit you.

          Comment


          • #6
            I also had several back surgeries and that heavy 65 lb saddle had to go!! I bought a wonderful light weight Circle Y flextree. Its only about 24 lb or so...and its really comfortable!!

            After I made the decision I telephoned Bedford Tack @ 931 437 2219 and ordered it ...They have great prices as they wholesale also. I spoke with a "cowboy" sounding fellow who was extremely knowledgeable and also was gifted with great patience!!

            The saddle retailed for around $1900 and I paid 1150 for it. It also has the gel seat too. It is partially synthetic and part leather. It comes in semi or full QH bars...I use it on a huge very wide horse with a flat barrel back and its fine.

            I was so extremely pleased with his advice and service that I later ordered 26 saddles, bridles and breastcollars from them for the Mounted unit I'm involved in. Those were Tuckers ...also a wonderful saddle. Actually read of a long distance rider that after doing 3000 mi is starting on a 5000 mi trip and thats the saddle she chose from experience. Its full leather though.

            My Circle Y is a great saddle IMO!!
            "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"

            Comment


            • #7
              I have an Abetta right now and love it. It is super lightweight and quite affordable. On the other hand, there are a lot of different synthetics on the market it can be mind boggling.

              www.horsesaddleshop.com they have a wide variety of brands and styles.
              MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
              http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

              Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by birdsong View Post
                I also had several back surgeries and that heavy 65 lb saddle had to go!! I bought a wonderful light weight Circle Y flextree. Its only about 24 lb or so...and its really comfortable!!

                My Circle Y is a great saddle IMO!!
                Yes, Circle Y makes some very nice saddles... however, their tree is not always well-fitting to a wide-bodied ("stout" as the OP stated) QH. The CY tree does not (and it depends on the specifc saddle and the tree in the CY) flare enough at the front, nor does it have enough rock (front to back scoop) to sit correctly on many horses -this causes it to sit at the front and rear points of the tree only, rather than along either side of the spine.

                I was really excited when I recently saw one of the newer CYs at a tack store.. I really liked the rigging it had; however, it was only available in their semi QH tree... which is a terrible fit (been there, had 2) for my foundation bred - but high withered QH.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I like treeless. I have a terrible back and they are extraordinarily comfortable and lightweight. Mine with stirrups, girth, pad etc weighs around 10lbs. They are in all price ranges from around $500-2200. They fit a nice range of horses from very wide to more narrow. Getting the right padding is crucial for successful use.

                  There are a couple treeless I believe in a western style. However, most have a twist that is wider than treed saddles which on a very wide horse may be a problem for you. Also, I'm not sure if someone who is getting back into riding after a long layoff and prefers western would feel as secure in a treeless.

                  If you are interested, there is a yahoo treeless saddles group. You can search their archives for western style treeless reviews to see if it would an option for you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have no personal experience with synthetics but I've just started learning about Alliance Saddlery. They approached us about doing an episode. It seems the saddles are geared towards America's horse stock type body so perhaps this would work with your new mare?

                    Their website is http://www.lynnpalm.com/alliance-saddles2.php and they look quite nice but I'm really looking forward to trying one out. I'm still learning about Lynn Palm but it seems she's done some amazing things with the AQHA and her philosophies about training are very interesting so perhaps she promotes and equally quality saddle?

                    If you try one, I'd love to hear feedback! Best of luck and congrats on getting back in the saddle!

                    angelea kelly | HorseGirlTV® | HorseGirlTV.com
                    @AngeleaKelly on Facebook & Twitter
                    @HorseGirlTV on Facebook & Twitter

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Abetta

                      Another vote for Abetta saddles here. I've got two: one Arabian tree western and one endurance saddle. If you can live without a horn, I think the endurance saddle is better. I've got the waffle bottom rather than fleece on my endurance. The western-style has the fleece bottom, and I don't like it as much. Plus, the western saddle does not have strong attachments for things you want to hang from the saddle, and it has no crupper ring. The western saddle is currently at Bartville Saddlery having the horn removed and some more subtantial rings for hanging stuff. Plus, they are putting a crupper attachment on for me.

                      I always feel like the saddle horn is aiming for my guts, especially if we are going up a steep hill or my horse wants to pop over a log. I like the western tree these days for support of a bad hip, but I can do without the darn horn! I also use dog collars to turn the stirrups, since western fenders sore my knees if the stirrups aren't turned.

                      Both saddles are under 15 lbs.

                      One thing I do not like about synthetic saddles is the nylon rigging. I bought one of those things that allows the rider to tighten the girth in the saddle and use the holes to secure the girth on the other side. Before that, I'd had the girth come loose several times on the trail. Luckily my horse is very high withered, and after a ride I have to jump out of the saddle, so it never slipped off. You can buy leather rigging to use instead if you have similar concerns.
                      "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If the nylon cinch straps came loose... were they tied or did you use the holes and buckle it? I've never had a girth come loose if it's buckled and leather, buckled, is how I do it... less bunch under my leg.

                        I also, always, tighten, walk the horse, tighten, walk the horse, do horse leg stretches - if necessary, and do a final tighten.

                        I HAVE - when doing lllooonnnggg rides discovered that the saddle has loosened for other reasons: the horse dropping weight, the leather stretching when it's still "new", or the saddle repositioning itself if it wasn't set into the "sweet spot".

                        I have seen one Abetta "fail"... with a large rider. The cantle of the western saddle just lost strength and flattened out, more and more.

                        So far as turned stirrups. I have ALWAYS been a die-hard leather saddle person until I rode a friend's Tennesean on her spotted saddle horse. My lower leg (where I have a rod implanted and 8 screws) and ankles were MUCH less tired during the ride because the synthetic fenders and stirrup straps were much more flexible. On that note... A tall rider - let's say over 5'7" with a short fendered saddle will have less strain on their ankle and lower leg than a short rider - 5'3" because of how close the stirrup is to the lowest edge of the fender.
                        Soaking the leathers and twisting the fenders helps.. but does not eliminate it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Actually, it is where the girth is fastened to the D that failed. The string tying them together failed on more than one occasion. The parts just worked themselves loose.

                          My horse is so high-withered that I don't ride with a very tight girth. I rely on the breastplate to keep it from slipping back. His withers keep it from slipping forward going downhill, but I need to get him used to a crupper. He bucks when he's excited, so I've been reluctant to try the crupper yet. Right now he just kicks up his heels (way higher than his croup) and hasn't tried to unseat me. I don't even want to think about how hard he can buck if he's trying to get me off. Still, I've got to bite the bullet and try if I don't want my saddle sliding painfully far up on his shoulders going down hill. Where's the chicken icon when I need it?
                          "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by matryoshka View Post
                            Actually, it is where the girth is fastened to the D that failed. The string tying them together failed on more than one occasion. The parts just worked themselves loose.
                            Matryoshka, Thank you for sharing that info.
                            I left the nylon rigging on mine, but will be sure to check it. Glad your saddle didn't slip. Could have been nasty.
                            MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
                            http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

                            Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bad back

                              NCCATNIP.
                              If you've got a bad back you've got more than just a saddle to consider. My wife has had 6 major back surgerys and has a pain implant. She has a light Circle Y and rides a Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse. Instead of a quarter horse may I suggest a gaited horse. I guarantee you'll be glad you did. I don't know how tall you are, but get the smallest horse that "fits" you. It'll make it a LOT easier to get on and off. My wife's 5'3". her horse it 13.2 hands.
                              The young people like sports cars (quater horses). Fast, but not too smooth. The older people like the Cadillacs (gaited horses) SMOOOOTH.
                              Your back will thank you.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Rockin Kgin View Post
                                NCCATNIP.
                                If you've got a bad back you've got more than just a saddle to consider. My wife has had 6 major back surgerys and has a pain implant. She has a light Circle Y and rides a Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse. Instead of a quarter horse may I suggest a gaited horse. I guarantee you'll be glad you did. I don't know how tall you are, but get the smallest horse that "fits" you. It'll make it a LOT easier to get on and off. My wife's 5'3". her horse it 13.2 hands.
                                The young people like sports cars (quater horses). Fast, but not too smooth. The older people like the Cadillacs (gaited horses) SMOOOOTH.
                                Your back will thank you.
                                Yes. I agree. I have purchased 2 gaited horses as my QH turns 21 this year and so many of my trail riding friends have gaited. BUT - having tried several different gaited horses and riding for a few hours on 2 of them, I am hear to tell you that my QH is as smooth or smoother, at the trot, then the gaited horses were. The problem is that he doesn't cover as much ground as quickly as the gaited, and it's difficult to keep everyone at the same speed. If I speed him up, he loses that softness but is still wonderful to ride at an easy posting trot.

                                Matryoshka - so far as the off-billet; yes, by all means replace that with a leather, doubled, off-billet. They come tied, but will stay in place without being tied.
                                I've actually seen saddles fail with the leather off billet because that's not ever checked or not checked every ride. Where it's folded over the ring, wears and gets very dried out. The 2 times I've seen saddles fail was during high speed work (cow and barrel racing).

                                On the crupper... start with a VERY soft lead rope or lunge line, and "play" with your horse's tail as much as possible (as I'm sure you already know). There are even some exercises ... Linda Tellington-Jones I think, that will help acustom your horse to having his tail handled and stretched, etc. Then be sure to practice pulling on those ropes/lines that go under his tail. That's where the lunge line comes in handy... stand at the shoulder of the horse and slide lunge line back and forth under his tail. You can even coat it with powder at first.

                                LOL about the "chicken icon" ... tee hee hee... don't blame you there at all. I'm always chuckling about "won't leave home without my helmet and my Blue Cross card"

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by gabz View Post
                                  ...On the crupper... start with a VERY soft lead rope or lunge line, and "play" with your horse's tail as much as possible (as I'm sure you already know). There are even some exercises ... Linda Tellington-Jones I think, that will help acustom your horse to having his tail handled and stretched, etc. Then be sure to practice pulling on those ropes/lines that go under his tail. That's where the lunge line comes in handy... stand at the shoulder of the horse and slide lunge line back and forth under his tail. You can even coat it with powder at first.
                                  That's the best advice I've heard so far. My concern wasn't getting him used to it being under his tail, but how it will feel during one of his bucks. I've been worried that the pulling sensation under his tail during a buck would cause him to really go into a bucking spree to rid himself of the crupper (and me). Your suggestion give me a way to manipulate and pull on the crupper without putting myself in harms way. Thanks!
                                  "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."

                                  Comment

                                  Working...
                                  X