• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

So what about NATRC do you like?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • So what about NATRC do you like?

    rivenoak and I took Prozac Pony and Mr. Blondie to a NATRC Competitive Trail Ride clinic today - and it was quite an interesting cross-cultural experience for us ;-)

    I was trying to describe CTR to a fellow eventer, and I'm afraid I made it sound quite sedate and - sorry to say - rather unexciting.

    But judging by the turnout at the clinic, and the enthusiasm demonstrated by the people who put on the clinic, there's got to be SOMETHING about it that draws people in.

    So that's what I'm here to ask - and please don't take this to be in any way condescending to your sport. This is not meant to be, "What on EARTH can you possibly find to like about CTR?" Not at all. From my very brief exposure to it today, I can think of a few things that might draw people in - I'm curious to see how close I am to reality.

    (The boys, by the way, said that they would just as soon have stayed home and watched TV - it went on FAR too long for them!)
    Approved helmet: Every time; every ride.
    "When a sport gets to be predictable it ceases to be fun." - RAR's wise brother

  • #2
    NATRC is far too sedate for my tastes.

    If you want a little more pizzazz, try endurance.

    However, with the screen name "risk averse" maybe sedate and slow is more your cuppa?
    Last edited by pandorasboxx; Jan. 20, 2008, 02:29 AM. Reason: another thought

    Comment


    • #3
      Natrc benefits

      I have almost 400 NATRC miles. I really enjoy the sport, but admit that it is not for everyone. Most Endurance horses would have trouble with the obsticles. They range from standing still while you mount to standing still while the group leaves him. You have to have a very well trained horse that is not of the race mentality. All the obsticles are horsemanship based. Equitation counts. You can't go bouncing down the trail in NATRC and expect to do well. Your horse has to know how to open a gate and sidepass a log and many other things that take patience and time to teach. I have 175 AERC miles and have heard many AERC people putting natrc down, but I don't take offense. I love both sports. My horse can do both. He is very well trained. I have spent years training him. Most people don't want to do that. Endurance is much easier. But they are both fun. They are both about enjoying your horse and the beautiful country that God has blessed us with. If you have never done NATRC or you have tried it and done poorly and given up, then you haven't experienced the sense of accomplishment that comes with knowing that your horse is so well trained that he can handle any number of things that come his way. That you are the best rider you can be. I have to admit that I am a bit of a snob when it comes to riding. After years of NATRC it is hard to go to an endurance ride and see people bouncing hard of their horses back, or riding two point the whole way, or posting the same diagional the whole trip.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by pandorasboxx View Post
        NATRC is far too sedate for my tastes.

        If you want a little more pizzazz, try endurance.

        However, with the screen name "risk averse" maybe sedate and slow is more your cuppa?
        Well... there's Risk-Averse, and there's Asleep.

        Wait... take that back. I promised myself I would try not to be judgmental.

        What I have done with my horses, when I had the motivation to drag my sorry self out of my funk and actually ride, was low level eventing and back-to-middle-of-the-pack field hunting. (Out here in Arizona, where we don't actually have things to jump, so don't be picturing Lucille Ball in "Auntie Mame" and get all excited ;-) A little 2'6" jumpers at schooling shows. But basically, I hate to show, so I really haven't pursued the competitive aspects this past year. But I do really enjoy going out with the beagle pack and bopping around in the desert, and I enjoy jumping up to about 2'6" - both in the ring and over cross country fences. And I actually like the challenge of dressage, too. But I don't want to spend all my time in the ring.

        So the idea of shuffling along on a trail for hours on end just doesn't do much for me. And I'm a BIG fan of indoor plumbing, so the idea of camping - even in a trailer - also doesn't do much for me. I figure I did my 2 years in the Peace Corps - that was enough primitive sanitation to last me a lifetime. For me, the Motel 6 is rustic camping.

        But as I said - there appear to be a lot of people really gung-ho about this. It's got to have something going for it. And all the emphasis on safety is great. In the lecture sessions, they talked a lot about things I'd never thought of related to tying your horse to the trailer (as I sat there, wondering if Prozac Pony & Mr. Blondie were wandering away, or pawing the valve stems off my tires...). It had never occurred to me that a horse might paw at my tire and break off the valve stem.

        There were also some things, though, that struck me as being overly safe - if such a thing is possible. One of our "obstacles" was to do a turn on the forehand and then back between a couple bushes. I was riding in my jumping saddle because I haven't gotten around to shopping for a new dressage saddle yet (major Inverness problems with the old one - no WAY I was going to spend 2+ hours in it!). I knew that I didn't have a chance in H-E-double hockey sticks of getting Mr. Blondie to listen to my leg with it way up there in jumping position, so I dropped my stirrups, asked him to turn, and started the reinback. From the look on the judge's face, you would have thought I had reached down and removed my girth! "It's not SAFE to ride without stirrups!" she said. "You should never drop your stirrups."

        Um... Well... Trying to be fair here, there's lots of conflicting stuff going on. She didn't know me or my horse. BUT - I'm an adult. She might have given me credit for knowing whether or not it was safe to drop my stirrups. I was in a jumping saddle. By dropping my stirrups, I actually lowered my center of mass and had more leg on my horse than when I had my feet in the stirrups. Arguably, in some ways I was more secure than when I had my feet in the stirrups. Mind you, I wouldn't have JUMPED that way, but I was perfectly comfortable doing what I did without stirrups, and I was perfectly comfortable the several other times on the trail when I dropped them, even sometimes when we went up & down small slopes. I'm used to riding without stirrups at WTC - it's NOT unsafe for me to drop my stirrups. I think to issue a blanket fiat that you should never drop your stirrups is going a bit overboard.

        But... their game; their rules. You can't compete in dressage without stirrups, either.

        I also found their attitude towards leg protection odd - but I'm willing to accept that maybe it's because I'm just never on my horses for really long periods of time. Unless we're just noodling around on the dirt roads in the neighborhood, I *ALWAYS* put some kind of galloping boots / brushing boots on my horses, as well as bell boots in front. I had a friend whose horse backed into a cactus and punctured a tendon sheath. He may never be ridable again. With a boot on, that wouldn't have happened. But NATRC doesn't allow leg protection. The woman running the clinic kept saying that sand gets in the boots and chafes the horses' legs. I put boots on my horses for hunting - we go through washes and we're out for 2 hours - no sand in them when we take the boots off. But maybe we're just not out long enough. Hard to say. But that just might be a deal breaker for me.

        That and the fact that nothing seems to happen.
        Approved helmet: Every time; every ride.
        "When a sport gets to be predictable it ceases to be fun." - RAR's wise brother

        Comment


        • #5
          RAR- Are you going to do the NATRC ride in Wickenburg? I am considering it. I've done a few NATRCs, the last being about 7 years ago.

          It is interesting to hear your comments about CTR because I manage a non-sanctioned CTR, (which is faster paced and no obstacles) and we allow leg protection for some points off, no horsemanship judging, and dont care how you keep your horse at the trailer. I read the CTR yahoo group and they are always discussing these issues- should they get rid of the seemingly arbitrary rules to attract more people. I say yes!

          I personally agree about the splint boots- I use them on my endurance horse who interferes and needs them, hence I cant do CTR with him. He never has a problem with sand, heat build-up, or what have you, and I've had them on up to 11 hours for a 65 miler!

          I think the horsemanship judging rules are a little silly too. I am hoping to do the one in March though, with my young mare who doesnt need boots. I havent done enough NATRC to say for sure if I really like it, so we will see.......and I definitely want to try to support any horse sport in AZ!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh, and if you do the Open division, I believe you go faster- like mostly trotting. The issue I guess would be though that this upcoming ride, is a 2 day for the Open division, so you'd be doing 50-55 miles which is probably a lot for someone new to distance riding.

            the 2 rides I did were Novice and wow, they were terrribly slow. My butt hurt so bad and I just wanted to trot and canter and get the dang thing over with!! I think one ride I did was 24 miles and we had over 8 hours to do it!!!!!!!! Even taking some time to do the obstacles, that was way too slow!

            Comment


            • #7
              Texasaggie, no argument here LOL

              Originally posted by texasaggie1995 View Post
              I have almost 400 NATRC miles. I really enjoy the sport, but admit that it is not for everyone. Most Endurance horses would have trouble with the obsticles. They range from standing still while you mount to standing still while the group leaves him. You have to have a very well trained horse that is not of the race mentality. All the obsticles are horsemanship based. Equitation counts. You can't go bouncing down the trail in NATRC and expect to do well. Your horse has to know how to open a gate and sidepass a log and many other things that take patience and time to teach. I have 175 AERC miles and have heard many AERC people putting natrc down, but I don't take offense. I love both sports. My horse can do both. He is very well trained. I have spent years training him. Most people don't want to do that. Endurance is much easier. But they are both fun. They are both about enjoying your horse and the beautiful country that God has blessed us with. If you have never done NATRC or you have tried it and done poorly and given up, then you haven't experienced the sense of accomplishment that comes with knowing that your horse is so well trained that he can handle any number of things that come his way. That you are the best rider you can be. I have to admit that I am a bit of a snob when it comes to riding. After years of NATRC it is hard to go to an endurance ride and see people bouncing hard of their horses back, or riding two point the whole way, or posting the same diagional the whole trip.
              Hey Aggie, I agree with you on much of this! NATRC is more about the horsemanship than the race. I salute those who do NATRC well. It takes a certain horse, patience and mindset for this sport.

              However, its minutiae, detail and pace all are so far from what I look for in a sport. I like it less restriction, more excitement and figuring out my own strategy, riding my own ride.

              Absolutely, my horse would not be able to do well in NATRC. She walks off while mounting, is a pain to open a gate from and when on the trail likes to move out. Hey but she does sidepass well......

              I am probably one of those folks you've gasped about as far as equitation goes. Thats why I recently started dressage lessons to improve. The top endurance riders regularly school in dressage for a better partnership with their horses. While I do switch diagonals and avoid endless miles of two point, I am balance challenged and no equitation model. And I've seen worse at rides so I know just what mean LOL

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                I can see many benefits for the horse of the emphasis NATRC places on horsemanship - if it helps educate the folks who think they can just buy a horse and treat it like a bicycle, then more power to them! (Although my brother does triathlons, and some times, I think he treats his bikes better than I treat my horses!!! )

                One of our obstacles involved walking over some "logs" (itty bitty branches) going up a hill. We had to stop while straddling the third log, count to 5, then continue. I could just hear Mr. Blondie saying to me, "Um, Mom... that's 20 penalty points! We're not supposed to STOP!!" He was clearly confused ;-) But he listened to me like the good boy he is.

                I don't know - I guess I was expecting a higher obstacle to distance ratio. More like the Extreme Cowboy Race I recently watched. But I suppose if you only have one set of judges, and the judges have to haul a$$ from one obstacle to the next to catch all the horses, you have to have a lot of distance between obstacles.

                Just not my thang...
                Approved helmet: Every time; every ride.
                "When a sport gets to be predictable it ceases to be fun." - RAR's wise brother

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Risk-Averse Rider View Post
                  I
                  I don't know - I guess I was expecting a higher obstacle to distance ratio. More like the Extreme Cowboy Race I recently watched. But I suppose if you only have one set of judges, and the judges have to haul a$$ from one obstacle to the next to catch all the horses, you have to have a lot of distance between obstacles.
                  Yes, and they are also judging on the condition of the horses-it is not just going out there doing obstacles. there are 2 scores- the horse and horsemanship.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I did a 30-mile CTR last fall. The pace was fast enough (5 hours max to do 30 miles), the judging of the horse's condition was a bit puzzling. She mentioned stuff that I couldn't see or feel, and I was dumbfounded. However, I saw no point in arguing, because as somebody else posted, their game, their rules. My horse's back was not at all tender when we finished the ride, but we still somehow had had points deducted from the preride exam? I could be wrong about that, but it seemed very subjective to me.

                    At the pre-ride brief, I asked if they ever plan to allow hoof boots with gaiters, and they said that it is a source of contention. The person who was giving the brief is of the opinion that they cause chafing and should not be allowed.

                    Again, I didn't argue with them. But I thought that the vets/judges should then be required to judge the shoeing of the horses who are competing, because I saw quite a few terribly contracted heels on horses ridden by serious competitors . If one is going to make judgments about whether boots cause problems, then they should look more closely at the feet of all the horses. My horse lost a boot and had to do the last 15 miles barefoot--she did beautifully. I don't think there were many shod horses who were sound for long after pulling a shoe--they are too accustomed to shoes to handle the course barefoot and could be lame within a few strides of pulling a shoe. One can forfiet one's standing in the ride and apply a boot with a gaiter to protect the hoof, but how many people are going to choose that option to save a hoof when it takes them out of the standing? And if your horse overreaches at all, the boots aren't going to stay on without a gaiter or glue.

                    Sorry for the harangue. This is a bit of a sore spot for me. I'd love to try CTR with my OTTB, but I don't want him in shoes and he needs the gaiters to keep the boots on. He'd pull shoes regularly since he overreaches. I liked the relaxed atmosphere of the CTR compared to endurance, and I liked how they started in groups of three rather than all at once. The only problem with starting in groups is if your horse gets herd bound, you are at the mercy of the other riders to ride a smart ride. It's hard to ride your own pace when you are in a small group.

                    I guess it is a matter of different strokes for different folks. My horse would not do well if judged on manners (yet), but it sure would be a good challenge for us to have to focus on that rather than heading down the trail simply looking for trail markers. And I liked that people weren't galloping madly around, yielded the trail for people passing, etc.

                    I'm sure there are good, fun folks in both disciplines, and there seem to be a number of people who compete in both. I'd like to be able to do both for different types of schooling for my horse. Not gonna happen because of the boots, though.
                    "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've never had a problem with anyone yielding trail on an endurance ride. For the most part people are very considerate.

                      I've attended an endurance ride a couple of times that had both an ECTRA and an AERC ride running on the same course, same management simultaneously. Now it wasn't anal NATRC so the pace for the CTR was pretty brisk. There seemed to be slightly different concerns for the participants but for the most part all was in harmony.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        matry, yes the boots with gaiters is a whole nother issue for me. Finally have a distance horse who doesnt need splint boots but I've gone the whole barefoot route and am going to stay with that, its working well. SO if I do the upcoming NATRC ride, will have to foam regular easy boots on. Definitely not looking forward to that and it may be a deal killer.

                        I really think some of these rules should change!!

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by saratoga View Post
                          RAR- Are you going to do the NATRC ride in Wickenburg? I am considering it. I've done a few NATRCs, the last being about 7 years ago.
                          No... the no-boots issue is a deal-breaker for me, plus they were saying that Wickenburg is really rocky. I thought the Estrella Mtn trails were quite rocky (and my boys have pads in front), so I don't even want to think about what Wickenburg might look like.

                          There is some sort of trail trials thing coming up at McDowell Mtn Regional Park soon - I'm trying to find out about that. It's more expensive ($75) because it's a fundraiser, but the trails I've been on in that park have been quite good, and it's much closer for me than Estrella Mtn, so I might consider doing that, depending on what the requirements are and when it is.
                          Approved helmet: Every time; every ride.
                          "When a sport gets to be predictable it ceases to be fun." - RAR's wise brother

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My blonde horse asked me to put the Horses Help trail trials on his calendar, so I did. I saw it in Bridle & Bit. I'm happy that you saw it, too. It is 'spensive, but my whole worldview of 'spensive with horses has changed this past year, LOL.

                            I used to ride my previous Ayrab gelding in trail trials put on by the CA State Horsemen's Association, and they were basically walking trail rides, maybe 2-4 hours in length on average, with 10-12 obstacles along the way that you were judged at, similar to what you guys did yesterday. But there was no overnight camping or tying, no being judged at your trailer, and no restrictions on tack or equipment. They were basically a great excuse to go for a long, leisurely trail ride in a new park on new trails, with some obstacles thrown in along the way. If the one at McDowell Mountain is similar, and the trails aren't real rocky, I really want to go! The palominos need to be there to represent!
                            Visit the County Island, home of Whiskey the ranch horse: http://countyisland.wordpress.com
                            Visit him on Facebook:
                            http://www.facebook.com/WhiskeyRanch-Horse

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For those of you who may get confused byt the seemingly different descriptions about CTRs, the entire NE secton of the US has ECTRA CTRs, not NATRC. For the Va rider who attended a ride that was both AERC and ECTRA, in reality it was an AERC endurance ride which had ECTRA sanctoning. What that means; in states where there are no ECTRA rides, an AERC ride manager can sanction with ECTRA so that any ECTRA member who enters the endurance ride can get mileage credit for their horse. They ride by AERC rules, it's an endurance ride. ECTRA rides are actually fairly fast paced. For instance you have 4 hours 10 min to 4 hours 40 min to complete a 25 mile ride. And that includes the 20 min hold at the mid point. AERC allows 6 hours from start to horse meeting the pulse requirement finish.

                              NATRC is often called a horse show in the woods. It would be largely about the training of your horse and your riding and your willingness to fit their mold. Lot's of folks love the judged trail rides also which are quite similar to NATRC, IMO.

                              chicamuxen

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Thanks for clearing that up Bonnie! I thought they were roughly the same thing, and that some ECTRA rides were judged. I found the pace of the 30 mile ride at Fair Hill to be brisk but not particularly fast. It was fun and people were very nice. There ware a lot of aspects I liked and some that I didn't like. Given the chance, I'd do another CTR for sure.

                                People were also very nice at the Foxcatcher Endurance ride last year. However, I was very conscious of the fact that people who wanted to pass might feel aggressive about it, since it is something of a race. On the contrary, people were very nice to me, especially considering that my horse didn't want to be passed and was a pain about it. I did hear complaining from others who were trying to win or top 10 about people not yielding to be passed, but perhaps those were regular trail riders who didn't understand or care that an endurance rider was trying win.
                                Last edited by matryoshka; Jan. 22, 2008, 10:24 AM.
                                "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Overall the care that one is taught in how to keep your horse alive while covering distance in the wilderness... you know the goal is both horse and rider to come back alive and uninjured.

                                  You learn to recognize trouble signs in advance of dire consequences… also you learn what to do when the unexpected actually shows up.

                                  We use our show horses, they have a combined mileage of about 4,000 miles on them now; they seem to enjoy the outings rather than doing arena work all the time. They have been both nationally ranked as show horses and NATRC horses

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by chicamuxen1 View Post
                                    NATRC is often called a horse show in the woods. It would be largely about the training of your horse and your riding and your willingness to fit their mold. Lot's of folks love the judged trail rides also which are quite similar to NATRC, IMO.
                                    Not quite true but of course if you are back east on flat ground it may be considered such, you may need to try one in the Davis Mountains at 7,000ft

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      In short, it has made my horse a better horse, and me a better horseperson.

                                      You might think you have a well trained horse until you ask him to stand still or sidepass over a W while all the Open riders are taking off at a brisk trot in front of him...

                                      I also enjoy the camping aspect, and hanging out with the horses. It's a fairly good value too, with most rides under $100 for 3 days, most often including some meals.

                                      It has also allowed me to ride in all different areas, most with beautiful scenery, spots to which I probably would not have gotten on my own.

                                      That said, I would rather have shorter rides and more obstacles. Wish TREC was popular over here like it is in Europe!


                                      I have over 650 miles in NATRC so far, but will probably fade it out this year. My horse is now sane enough (because af all his miles with other horses passing, running in the distance, etc..) that he actually behaves himself on the cross country course, which I love.
                                      "When life gives you scurvy, make lemonade."

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        One of the things that has occurred to me - and it almost certainly doesn't apply to anyone here - is that NATRC would be of great benefit if it can attract and educate people who buy a horse and stick it in their backyards and just head out on the trails with it, with no formal training (or even any informal training ;-)
                                        Approved helmet: Every time; every ride.
                                        "When a sport gets to be predictable it ceases to be fun." - RAR's wise brother

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X