• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Hackney pony

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    I WISH Mine was!

    Originally posted by Renae View Post
    At the barn I work at nearly every Hackney Pony we have had here is broke to ride and has been shown road pony or pleasure pony under saddle. Some of the pleasure ponies have been taught to wear a full bridle and have also been shown by 10 & under kids in walk & trot saddle seat equitation. They certainly are rideable, you just have to teach your kiddos to be game, good riders.
    I would revel in the challenge of a hackney pony to drive however DD is just not brave enough to master that kind of pony. She's very very cautious and very timid even after 2 years in the saddle on the steady eddies she just ain't got the fortitude to master one. I only wish I was short enough and light enough to handle one. Though in my current state I certainly couldn't even handle a full sized on in the traces. One day though oh one day I will have a matched pair and we shall fly around the ring in full colors!
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.

    Comment


    • #22
      It's hardly surprising that the Hackney horse and pony makes a good riding horse.

      Consider it's origins:

      The word 'Hackney' comes from a language commonly spoken in England in Medieval times. It means and describes a riding horse with a particularly comfortable trot or amble and over the years the term became synonymous with a general purpose ridden and driven animal whose stamina and soundness were greatly admired and whose favoured pace was the trot. These horses were just at home taking the farmer to market, working on the farm or enjoying a days hunting.

      Comment


      • #23
        Sadly, I didn't get my first hackney until I was in my mid-twenties, because roadster pony under saddle would have been right up my alley... and he had never been broke to saddle, but they are highly adaptable little guys....

        http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...e/Shortcut.jpg

        I don't know what posessed me to try this, but luckily there was a camera handy.
        ::I do not understand your specific kind of crazy, but I do admire your total commitment to it::

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by Renae View Post
          At the barn I work at nearly every Hackney Pony we have had here is broke to ride and has been shown road pony or pleasure pony under saddle. Some of the pleasure ponies have been taught to wear a full bridle and have also been shown by 10 & under kids in walk & trot saddle seat equitation. They certainly are rideable, you just have to teach your kiddos to be game, good riders.
          Yep! In fact, back when I was a kid in like the 1970s, it was very fashionable to have the kids do equitation on 'em. I'd forgotten about this until you mentioned it!
          "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

          Comment


          • #25
            Oh and I forgot the Saddlebred trainer I used to help at shows. She had a client, a funeral director, who's wife showed her Hackney driving full mane and tail at the ASB shows.

            The Hackney's name was Napoleon because, well, you can imagine he thought himself pretty high and mighty for his size. And she was a wee bit of a white haired thing. But she loved that Nappy pony.

            We would get him all tarted up for his class while she tarted herself up. Once the bridle went on, the pony did this strange thing where he beared his teeth like a dog growling at you. Once in the heat of competition, the little old lady would grimace the same way in concentration. It was pretty darn cute and we would tease her about it after the class. He was a pretty snappy little pony and was just perfect for little old ladies to drive on Sundays!
            ...don't sh** where you eat...

            Comment


            • #26
              I got a friends old retired from the show ring roadster pony for my then 3 year old daughter to be led around on. She was a beautiful pony, jet black with a stripe and low whites. She would patiently carry my daughter around quietly and stand like a statue while she brushed her. One day my friend brought a 2 wheeled cart out for us to drive Mary around. She turned from quiet and calm to a raging fireball when she was hitched to this cart. It was a total transformation. She was a blast to drive. It was definitely like driving a sports car. She was a wonderful pony and I still miss her.
              Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by winfieldfarm View Post
                Once the bridle went on, the pony did this strange thing where he beared his teeth like a dog growling at you.
                Interesting.....
                Like RMJacobs I have come into owning a Hackney pony by chance.
                In fact, I was just about to post about him when I saw this thread.

                He does this same "Growl" face, but never follows it up with any mean/unpleasant/undesirable action - just a quick nod of his head then back to Business As Usual. I just took it as part of his personality.
                Which, BTW, he has in SPADES!

                So what is this Hackney Growl? What, if anything, does it mean?

                My guy was given to me by my shoer who had trained him to drive then had a wreck. At age 65 shoer thought the better part of valor was rehoming this pony (he still has several ponies he shows to cart) & I needed a companion for my horse.

                As a pal, Pony is superb. He figured out the routine here in about 2 days.
                My horses are out 24/7/365 with free access to stalls. They come in to be fed & are only stalled for shoer or vet visits. Pony is not only a great pal to my 17h+ WB, he has lovely manners now that he has gotten over his initial RUNAWAAAAAY!!! reaction. I can now groom & tack (surcingle) him in his stall with the Dutch door in back open to Freedom.

                Although due to injury (mine) & weather (HOT!) I have only longed him about 6 or 8 times since he came to me in May, already he will slow his (Roadster) trot & walk on the longe on voice command. We are working on "Halt" - which is what I wanted to ask about on this Forum.
                As soon as I can find a suitable bridle I will start longlining him.

                I met his breeder - a local guy - at the County Fair this Summer and he was pleased to find out where the pony had ended up (he uses the same shoer, who he sold pony to & had heard about the accident). Pony is from his first crop of foals from a stallion he bought about 12 years ago (Pony is 10).

                I have lots of experience with horses & some with ponies, but never a Hackney. They are truly something else!

                Re: the cross for a Children's Hunter.
                May years ago I showed with a little girl who had a mutt pony who looked like a mini TB - he was very fine.
                He could jump the moon and now I'm thinking he must have had some Hackney in him.

                I hope your sale pony ends up with someone who will love & understand him.
                *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by War Admiral View Post
                  WORD!!!! I used to watch my aged little'un and think DANG, why is nobody crossing these with something a little more solid?

                  Philosophical question though (probably needs to be a spinoff thread) - what to cross them with?? I'm so not a breeder and honestly so not a pony person either, except for Hackneys.

                  And RMJacobs, I think we're both essentially saying the same thing!
                  Not many kiddos can handle a Hackney Pony much less a younger one. They are a trial by fire as I found out when I was training one. He was a stunning example of his breed and very well bred. He was also one of the smartest, quickest, most stubborn ponies I ever had my hands on. He was originally trained to drive but they wanted to use him as a pony for the grand child. Yeah no, that didn't go well at all. He cleaned up as a leadline pony but once off the line he was far too much pony for the kid to handle. I wouldn't want to cross them with anything, honestly they are perfect the way they are. Either you can handle them or you can't and I really like them that way.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Hi, Im new here, but could not help chiming in on this one LOL
                    I own and drive american Shetlands, some of which are an mix of Shetland and hackney.

                    For an childs hunter cross, look at the Shawackneys (Shetland, hackney, welsh cross, often an cross of an modern Shetland on an welsh mare) Ive seen an few of them, nice ponies usually with more substance, and slightly more "dulled" reactions than the hackney, but more refined with more endurance and scope than the welsh.

                    Amie

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      I take it you liked my post?

                      Originally posted by doramide7 View Post
                      Not many kiddos can handle a Hackney Pony much less a younger one. They are a trial by fire as I found out when I was training one. He was a stunning example of his breed and very well bred. He was also one of the smartest, quickest, most stubborn ponies I ever had my hands on. He was originally trained to drive but they wanted to use him as a pony for the grand child. Yeah no, that didn't go well at all. He cleaned up as a leadline pony but once off the line he was far too much pony for the kid to handle. I wouldn't want to cross them with anything, honestly they are perfect the way they are. Either you can handle them or you can't and I really like them that way.
                      me thinks a troll likes me!
                      Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
                      Originally Posted by alicen:
                      What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by War Admiral View Post
                        I hear ya on all counts!

                        Trying to come up with a viable Hackney cross for sport pony purposes would be a much more appealing proposition if we had honest-to-God 4Realz Pony Jumper divisions in this country. I could see a typy sporty Hackney cross being quite successful in that. But since we don't, it's sort of just a theoretical question on my part!
                        I've had several Hackney Pony mares. In general, I've found the ones that are dumped because they aren't going to be super show ponies quite sensible and easy to work with once they are turned out to pasture and allowed to act like any other pony.

                        One of the most successful small ponies I bred was by my small Connemara stallion and out of a Hackney Pony mare. She went to a 7 year old rider as her first pony. She was a bold rider and had all she wanted of the school ponies. She had an astonishing length of stride, in fact her first trainer (also a child, but 12 years old and very experienced) schooled her with TBs with no problems. She did have a lot of go, she was sensitive to aids ... wouldn't have worked for a child who only understood "kick,kick,kick" to go. This child loved her and on a light rein she moved in a reasonable hunter pony frame, she loved to jump, all you needed to do was point her in the general direction and she'd get her rider there and over the jump, always clean. She didn't do super well in model classes because she was a bit "plain", didn't have the cute pony head, but she always scored so well over fences and in hack classes that she came home with a very respectable number of high point wins at local shows against some fairly high quality competition.

                        I have a smallish (15.2) hand 3/4 warmblood mare that I'm seriously considering breeding to a Hackney Pony stallion this next year. I am no longer breeding big horses and need to go with a small stallion for her ... she's a bit on the heavy warmblood type and I suspect the cross may work quite well.
                        Kaleidoscope Farm
                        http://www.stallionstation.com/kaleidoscopefarm

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          I always say that ponies are like spots. They've got a habit of spreading!

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I'm sorry to say I had to make that most difficult decision earlier this week to put my beloved Hackney pony down. He was euthanized Monday night, and I miss him terribly. He was an energizer bunny nearly to the end; when he stopped being one, we knew it was time to do that last loving act for him.

                            Get Crackin' (known as Crackers) lived a good long life, five months past his 29th birthday. He touched the lives of a lot of people and I hope he brought as much joy to others as he did to me.

                            Rebecca

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              I am sorry Rebecca, he sounded like a special pony. I love hancknies but have never had one of my own.
                              Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
                              Bernard M. Baruch

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Thoughts and prayers for you ~

                                Originally posted by RMJacobs View Post
                                I'm sorry to say I had to make that most difficult decision earlier this week to put my beloved Hackney pony down. He was euthanized Monday night, and I miss him terribly. He was an energizer bunny nearly to the end; when he stopped being one, we knew it was time to do that last loving act for him.

                                Get Crackin' (known as Crackers) lived a good long life, five months past his 29th birthday. He touched the lives of a lot of people and I hope he brought as much joy to others as he did to me.

                                Rebecca
                                Thoughts and prayers for you ~ RIP Crackers ~
                                Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Thanks, Amwrider and ZuZu. I have graduated to not looking for him every time I go past the corral. Just some of the time...sigh...

                                  Rebecca

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by War Admiral View Post
                                    WORD!!!! I used to watch my aged little'un and think DANG, why is nobody crossing these with something a little more solid?

                                    Philosophical question though (probably needs to be a spinoff thread) - what to cross them with?? I'm so not a breeder and honestly so not a pony person either, except for Hackneys.

                                    And RMJacobs, I think we're both essentially saying the same thing!
                                    Not many kiddos can handle a Hackney Pony much less a younger one. They are a trial by fire as I found out when I was training one. He was a stunning example of his breed and very well bred. He was also one of the smartest, quickest, most stubborn ponies I ever had my hands on. He was originally trained to drive but they wanted to use him as a pony for the grand child. Yeah no, that didn't go well at all. He cleaned up as a leadline pony but once off the line he was far too much pony for the kid to handle. I wouldn't want to cross them with anything, honestly they are perfect the way they are. Either you can handle them or you can't and I really like them that way.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Rebecca--I am very sorry for your loss. Sounds like he was very special. I was recently been introduced to the breed at a driving event...basically blurted out to a driver "WHAT is that glorious animal?!" She thought I was crazy!

                                      War Admiral--some people like a hackney/Clyde cross. Supposed to make a good combined driving horse. Someone has been trying to convince me to breed my Clyde mare to a hackney because she is "old style" stout and build like a tank, not the long-legged variety. Although I already have too many horses, it is certainly tempting.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Rebecca - so sorry to hear of your loss.
                                        Crackers sounds like a truly special pony.
                                        And you gave him a truly special life.

                                        I know what you mean about looking.
                                        Sometimes I still feel like I can see my 2 sadly lost boys in their stalls.
                                        Even though both are filled with different horses.
                                        *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                                        Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                                        Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                                        Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Thanks, Joan and 2DogsFarm. I found myself not relating to my other two horses the way I usually do earlier this week, and realized that it was because I was missing Crackers so much. It was sad because I've always loved each of them for their individual personalities. I just kept doing the usual stuff with them and it got better again, but it really took me by surprise.

                                          Today was better--I took Salt out for a nice drive, and spent a little time loving on Sassy.

                                          Rebecca

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X