• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Anyone suffer from back abnormalities that affect your riding?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Anyone suffer from back abnormalities that affect your riding?

    Let me first say that I've struggled with back pain in various forms since my teens, but its usually manageable, and never really interfered with anything I wanted to do. But about three years ago, I started getting shooting pains and started seeing doctors, massage therapists and chiropracters. I've finally hit upon someone who really is trying to figure out the problem and he recently orderd a full set of x-rays.

    Unfortunatley, it confirmed what I already knew - I have a congenital defect in L5 which causes torsion of my pelvis and strains my SI joint, which is what causes the pain. The big eye opener though, is that this is clearly the reason I have such a hard time sitting in my saddle straight. I certianly do my best, but since my pelvis just physically twists towards the left, its very very hard to shift it right to make proper "straight" turns. I endlessly exasperate my trainer on this.

    So, I'll be seeing a sporst medicine therapist at the recommendation of my chiro, but as optimistic as he is, he thinks I'll probably never be truly straight, which really frustrates me. I WANT to ride properly, but will I ever really overcome this? Is it possible to ride dressage and "compensate" if you can't sit truly straight in the saddle? Has anyone else ever dealt with a similiar situation?
    Here Be Dragons: My blog about venturing beyond the lower levels as a dressage amateur.

  • #2
    I dont have the same as you, but I hope you get the relief you need.

    For me, it turns out I have an extra vertebrea. The doctor found it when I had my last accident. He kept asking me if I had any back issues, finally I said why? and then he told me. Kind of odd really.

    Comment


    • #3
      I am different from you in that I don't have pain, but I do have pretty bad scoliosis- 44 degrees or something like that. My left ribcage is 3 inches shorter than my right, and my spine almost goes under my right shoulderblade. So when I ride, I collapse my left side, bring my right shoulder forward, and in turn, sit with my right hip farther forward. Sure makes riding straight very difficult.

      Edit- I haven't run into anything through 2nd level that I haven't been capable of, although I fear changes are going to be hard with my unlevel hips. I have had a judge or two comment on it- and one said she lowered my rider score for it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sancudo,

        I have scoliosis as well (and sounds very similar to yours although the offset of hip to shoulder may not be quite as much - but also the hip "rotation" as well).

        I have been going to a Feldenkrais practitioner for almost 6 years and she has made a world of difference in the flexibility of my hips as well as the "rotation".

        I'm still not straight (and probably never will be) but have so much more flexibility than I used to have and ride with more comfort and with more seat control...
        No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. - Eleanor Roosevelt

        Pleasure Portrait 1989-2016...sleep well my girl

        Comment


        • #5
          I dont have as bad as you but I have an injury in my lower back that causes me some pretty bad pain. I have learned to deal with it, but jumping I do seem to protect my back now and roll it (roach) when it needs to be flat. Jumping strains it a bit more than dressage. I can do sitting trot, even collected work with big gaits and its fine. Its the jumping that tweaks it.
          As for dealing with it. OTC anti inflams right now. I dont wana be on to hard drugs. Yes I get up and around in the am like a 90 yr old woman, but I refuse to give up yet.
          www.spindletopfarm.net
          Home of Puerto D'Azur - 1998 NA 100 Day Test Champion
          "Charcter is much easier kept than recovered"

          Comment


          • #6
            ooh ooh (raises hand)
            scoliosis, rib deformity on left side (looks like i have a third boob but more like an a cup... you dont notice it unless i wear a tight shirt) oh and lets not forget the mild case of spina bifida!

            i have seen a chiropractor regularly since age 3 and that seems to help alot. also learning how to become really aware of your body's center, and having a really upper level hot shot trainer really helps. it has taken me lots of regular hard work to be straight, but it CAN be done!
            learning that one hip "feeling" too far back and "being" too far back is the true demon. you'll get there, i can tell you want it bad enough
            www.destinationconsensusequus.com
            chaque pas est fait ensemble

            Comment


            • #7
              I have 25% curvature of the spine and a degenerated lower back and am also very crooked in the saddle. My left hip goes further forward but my left shoulder also drops. Am constantly finding my saddle hiked to the left when my riding gets really bad. A good exercise that works for me is to do a couple of sessions in a row of riding without any rein at all in an enclosed arena. Basically I just let the horse go where he wants as long he stays at the gait I want whether it's walk, trot or canter. My body has to learn to follow his turns and movement and it also shows me how much stronger I am on one side if he continually goes in a particular direction. Using no hands at all makes your body balance up and even out more. I keep a small rope on the D of my saddle and run the reins through the rope to keep them on the withers in case I need to grab them if things get hairy. I ride like this until I stop hiking my saddle to the left which is usually about 2 or 3 sessions.

              Another thing I've found has helped me tremendously with back pain is to have the stirrup bars well set back. Any saddle that throws me in a chair seat is extremely painful for me to ride in. Whereas a saddle that puts my legs under me is very comfortable and doesn't hurt my back. And strong abdominals also help to ease back pain. The stronger I am muscle wise in my mid section, the less back pain I have.

              Comment


              • #8
                A friend of mine has a tilted pelvis as well (for different reasons) and she has found that the Heather Moffet treeless saddle (Fheonix) has been a life saver. Her hips and back do not hurt with it and it doesn't restrict her position, so she can ride in any configuration that works for her. You might want to demo one to see if it helps you.
                "To be an equestrian in the classical sense is not just to be a rider.
                It is a position in life." --Charles de Kunffy

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've got a moderate mid-back scoliosis as well. my right seat bone is often about an inch higher than the left, which makes it difficult to ride evenly. My chiro helps with this - I ride level for about two weeks after an adjustment - but I have been unable to maintain the adjustment for longer than that, maybe because of the scoliosis. Unfortunately my insurance won't pay for me to see him every two weeks... so I just do what I can with stretching and ab work. Riding without stirrups also helps because it doesn't let my R leg 'clutch' so much. It tends to clench, I suppose because my seat bone isn't doing the work of keeping me on that side of the saddle...for instance, I actually have to lift my R leg away from the horse to leg yield to the right, or I block him from going over.

                  I've been learning jumping for the last 6 months, and the two point work is really killing my back...much more so than the dressage work does, including sitting trot.

                  I do notice that I have to keep up a certain level of abdominal strength to support my back...the more the better...and if that goes, my back goes. No belly, no back...

                  I never used to notice this or care when I was just a trail rider...I suppose if I ever live in a place again with fantastic trails, like what I grew up with, I might stop obsessing so much and just enjoy riding out. But for now I am a rider who schools dressage and jumping, so I have greater need for physical ambidexterity and balance.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Wow...I feel so much better. There is hope! The pain I can manage. I have all the right drugs to help when its too bad, and usually get by on some Aleve. But the feeling that my riding is hopelessly flawed was tough.

                    Its good to know that there are plenty of other people out there with similiar physical issues and that there are solutions. I am still hopeful and my chiro is sure that he and the sports medicine therapist can help me improve, but I wanted to hear from real riders!

                    Thanks!
                    Here Be Dragons: My blog about venturing beyond the lower levels as a dressage amateur.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Wow...I feel so much better. There is hope! The pain I can manage. I have all the right drugs to help when its too bad, and usually get by on some Aleve. But the feeling that my riding is hopelessly flawed was tough.

                      Its good to know that there are plenty of other people out there with similiar physical issues and that there are solutions. I am still hopeful and my chiro is sure that he and the sports medicine therapist can help me improve, but I wanted to hear from real riders!

                      Thanks!
                      Here Be Dragons: My blog about venturing beyond the lower levels as a dressage amateur.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wonky SI joints....my back hurts really easily from riding - and over the last couple years I've gotten pretty stiff if the horse gets bouncy.

                        PT recommended using a SI brace while riding - makes a HUGE difference.

                        Also ride in w/ a Seatbone saver to help keep me from twisting right. That makes a major difference, too! My right seatbone used to always fall off going right.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Epona, I haven't a defect, but I have a dislocated pelvis. 18mm on xray. My right hip is chronically shoved forwards. So yes, sitting straight in the saddle is truly a challenge. My chiropractor's look on his face when he was reading the xrays was priceless but worrysome. He even said, wow, and you can walk and everything, huh? I guess normally if people come in with that sort of dislocation, they're not on their feet.

                          *shrug*

                          I'm not letting it stop me, but i'm not ignoring it either. I see my chiro often.
                          Hopeful Farm Sport Horses
                          Midwest Breeders Group
                          Follow me on Twitter
                          Join me on Facebook

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi there! I've been lurking around for a while but finally decided to post as this is an interesting topic to me. I was involved in a major car accident a while back and injured my L1 S4 or something. I now have 3 blown discs and an appointment with the surgeon...at 24. My chiro said no more jumping if I want to keep riding. I am still in a fair bit of pain, but can't stay out of the tack much longer or I'll go crazy!! I take pain meds before I go to the barn so I don't get too ouchy during or after my ride. Now I also have difficulty keeping myself straight in the tack, and have a lot of weakness on my right side. What does everyone else do to keep pain free while riding?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JustABay View Post
                              Hi there! I've been lurking around for a while but finally decided to post as this is an interesting topic to me. I was involved in a major car accident a while back and injured my L1 S4 or something. I now have 3 blown discs and an appointment with the surgeon...at 24. My chiro said no more jumping if I want to keep riding. I am still in a fair bit of pain, but can't stay out of the tack much longer or I'll go crazy!! I take pain meds before I go to the barn so I don't get too ouchy during or after my ride. Now I also have difficulty keeping myself straight in the tack, and have a lot of weakness on my right side. What does everyone else do to keep pain free while riding?
                              Have you tried a TENS unit? They are battery operated and portable. About the size of a transitor radio and can be clipped to your belt. They can be quite expensive, but if you get a prescription they are usually covered by insurance.
                              "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Yes, badly damaged the left side of my SI joint a few years ago. I now only have moderate pain as long as I'm careful, but I can't take any antinflammatories. My riding suffers for it. I know I'm compensating somewhere else and I unconsciously guard that injury site.
                                www.littlebullrun@aol.com See Little Bull Run's stallions at:
                                "Argosy" - YouTube and "Boleem" - YouTube
                                Boleem @ 1993 National Dressage Symposium - YouTube

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  What's a TENS unit?? I've never heard of that

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by JustABay View Post
                                    What's a TENS unit?? I've never heard of that
                                    Here is one explanation. You can google it for others, and where to purchase, etc.

                                    http://arthritis.about.com/od/assist...g/tensunit.htm
                                    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I broke my L3 vertebrea about 3 years ago. When they did the x-ray they also found that I have a very mild case of scoliosis in my lower back. Which has caused me to get sciatica my entire life. Now that I know about the scolosis so many things make sense, like why I experience joint pain in my slightly longer leg after riding, the sciatica, which I always thought was just bad leg muscle cramps, and a whole slew of other things.

                                      Since the accident I do experience a lot more back related problems but for everyday life as long as I'm in shape I only experience pain occasionally buy boy oh boy things get BAD if i fall even a tiny bit out of shape. Whenever I try to do something athletic, like riding, I really notice how much more stiff my back is. After I've ridden for about a 1/2 hour I'm pretty sore and walk work bothers my back more then trotting or cantering. I drive my horse to a cart as well and oddly enough I'm much worse after sitting in that because of the bounciness. Maybe I can use it as an excuse to buy a 4 wheeled vehicle

                                      I no longer try to ride in perfectly even stirrups anymore. One is about 1/4-1/2 inch longer then the other one for my longer leg. That seems to help a lot for both my joint pain in that leg, my back pain and my horses responsiveness. I'm also thinking about getting the MDC stirrups (the non-jointed ones) so that my stirrup leather isn't twisted anymore. Anyone have any experience with those helping matters?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Right there with ya!

                                        I have three herniated discs- One in my neck and two in my lower back. I spent 2 and 1/2 months on bed rest last winter and barely squeeked by without surgery. I still ride- although I can't do much dressage anymore since it's very painful for me to ride a sitting trot. I do what I can but I'm much better off riding in a half-seat- so jumping it is! I don't ride very hard anymore though but the best thing for me has been STRETCHING before I get on and ICING my back for 30 minutes when I get finished. If I remember to do both of those- I'm fine but if I forget...bad news!!! Oh- did I mention that I'm 22? I had to walk away from the end of my junior career and a riding scholarship b/c of this lovely injury! But don't you worry...I'm still riding!! If there are any other suggestions- I'd love to hear them!! Thanks and good luck to all of you!

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X