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2 pointing in Dressage - discuss

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  • 2 pointing in Dressage - discuss

    OK, read this elsewhere and am fighting against the very notion....

    A 3-point positioning actually uses your butt to move the horse forward or rate the horse.
    A 2-point is more a balancing preparation used for approach to a fence for example...
    Both positions work together not only with a jumping rider but is used with dressage work too.
    Someone has responded that they warm up in 2 point....and I kind of get that....but as one who is constantly being yelled at to "get my damn arse in the plate" as I have been in a kind of forward seat for years......is there such a thing as 2 point in dressage 'proper'
    "He's not even a good pathological liar." Mara

    "You're just a very desperate troll, and not even a good one. You're like middle-school troll at best. Like a goblin, not even a troll." et_fig

  • #2
    Ingrid Klimke does it.....http://pferdia.de/de/videos/show/133...id-klimke.html
    https://www.facebook.com/Luckyacresfarm
    https://www.facebook.com/Ulrike-Bsch...4373849955364/

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    • #3
      I think there's a difference between intentionally doing it for a purpose, and what we get yelled at for

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      • #4
        When allowing the horse to loosen his back..... but to bring the haunches into play, to get engagement, IMO you need to have your "butt in the saddle".

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        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by atr View Post
          I think there's a difference between intentionally doing it for a purpose, and what we get yelled at for

          LOL undoubtedly....
          "He's not even a good pathological liar." Mara

          "You're just a very desperate troll, and not even a good one. You're like middle-school troll at best. Like a goblin, not even a troll." et_fig

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          • #6
            Originally posted by KBC View Post
            OK, read this elsewhere and am fighting against the very notion....



            Someone has responded that they warm up in 2 point....and I kind of get that....but as one who is constantly being yelled at to "get my damn arse in the plate" as I have been in a kind of forward seat for years......is there such a thing as 2 point in dressage 'proper'
            Stirrup length and the pommel shape make proper 2-point punishing in many dressage saddles.

            In my dressage saddle do stand in my stirrups, (think just shy of the top of the rise in the post), at times.

            But doing so is not as balanced, or nearly as stable, as the true 2-point I can assume in an AP or XC saddle.

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            • #7
              Not 2 point but lighten/hover my seat for half step work occasionally and for forward hand gallop work. I like the concept of getting off the back, but my stirrups are too long for an effective jumper style two point I think. A light out of the tack seat can be helpful when loosening the back and encouraging it to come up, esp in warming up.

              In the above cases the horse understands and reacts properly to a regular dressage seat so getting out of the tack has a specific purpose.

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              • #8
                Getting up off the horse's back can be incredibly helpful at times. For the same reasons we post the trot on young horses, we sometimes ride the canter up out of the tack to allow them to lift and come forward from behind. Like many things, it really helps some horses and is of no use to others.

                On an older horse, I will occasionally get up out of the tack at the canter when I allow the horse to stretch - or when I take them out on the track for a gallop or trot up a hill.

                I also lighten my seat without getting out of the tack for things like rein back or piaffe.

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                • #9
                  The best young horse trainer I know is a huge advocate of staying incredibly light in the tack at the canter for a long time. She really believed in going forward and letting the horse develop strength and confidence before being expected to accept the full weight of the rider at the canter. The horses she started usually had very impressive scores in the young horse tests. That being said, it was a very controlled light seat that I struggle to imitate and is much harder than she made it appear.

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                  • #10
                    ~ Enjoying some guac and boxed wine at the Blue Saddle inn. ~

                    Originally posted by LauraKY
                    I'm sorry, but this has "eau de hoarder" smell all over it.
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                    • #11
                      My horse is a bit on the lazy side and I found that I was nagging him with my legs too much. If I get up out of the saddle in the two point he is quite happy to go forward. I do this at the walk (which is for my benefit as my hips hurt and need warming up) then at the trot and canter. He will then go on to work willingly. This works well for us.I also lighten my seat during the stretching phase of our ride. Even in my dressage saddle I am comfortable in two point having done hunters and jumpers in my younger days.

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                      • #12
                        Whatever works is what happens

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                        • #13
                          My roots are in eventing, and I have trouble with getting too light in the saddle in the canter when I really should be sitting down. However, I will deliberately take a lighter seat if I'm asking for a stretchy trot on a green/stiff/unwilling horse. Not really a two point, just a three point, and mostly so I can follow the horse's neck.

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                          • #14
                            Maybe because my background is in eventing, but especially when a horse isn't very canter fit, 2-point can be helpful to encourage the horse to be forward and come up in his back. Or just to reward the horse or do something "fun."

                            My horse is also a bit cold-backed, and sometimes he's so cold-backed that I will trot in 2-point to let him warm up.

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                            • #15
                              I love two point. Both for my horses (I like hotter horses who can get balled up if they get tight in the back) to help them have looser backs, but also for my own position and strength. Nothing helps get my base solid like two point. Now, I do it differently in a dressage saddle than I would in a jumping saddle - I still keep my heels more parallel to the ground, so the muscles along the back of my legs are helping keep me balanced - where in a jumping saddle my heels would be way down, my calves on more, and toes rotated slightly out. My leg is looser in a dressage two point, since my horses go forward off any calf pressure, so all the stabilizing muscles get a better workout from it.

                              This transfers to the times my horse is tight at a show and I just think of having a looser seat in the saddle, not sitting quite as deeply, and it becomes and aid to swing more for her. Super useful.

                              I agree with the other comments that this is very different from not sitting properly in the saddle when sitting.
                              If Kim Kardashian wants to set up a gofundme to purchase the Wu Tang album from Martin Shkreli, guess what people you DON'T HAVE TO DONATE.
                              -meupatdoes

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                              • #16
                                I will two point as part of my personal warm up to help stretch my hamstrings and calves and to get weight in my heel. But in my dressage saddle I guess it's more of a standing up in the stirrups vs a true 2 point like when jumping.
                                RH Queen O Anywhere "Sydney"
                                2009 Sugarbush Draft mare
                                Western Dressage
                                Draft Mare blog

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