• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Questions about brain injury--and response

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by Equibrit View Post
    Type "brain injury" in to Google and all your questions will be answered. That way you don't have to bother others.
    Get over it if you're bothered
    Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive. Dalai Lama

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
      As an outsider, its just plain sensative to be... erm... well sensative

      THe sense of entitlement because she is a big name in dressage?? I dont get that at all sorry

      Ask how she is? Sure! But sayin "Hey! Whats the extent of this or that?" Nope, not buying it, nobody should feel thats their business. If they are a personal friend, then they can ask all that personally

      Then the whole shoulda coulda woulda of helmet laments...

      Crazed I tell ya crazed

      Farmgirl wasn't insenstive...Guess we can agree to disagree on this one.
      Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive. Dalai Lama

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by ridgeback View Post
        Get over it if you're bothered
        We can't have such a sensitive soul as yourself getting bum information or starting any malicious rumours - now can we ? [edit]
        Last edited by admin; Mar. 20, 2010, 05:13 PM. Reason: to remove personal attack
        ... _. ._ .._. .._

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by Equibrit View Post
          We can't have such a sensitive soul as yourself getting bum information or starting any malicious rumours - now can we ? [edit].
          Well you must be confused Equibrit and I won't attack you as you tend to do and did with me. I never said anything about her condition so how could I be spreading any malicious rumors. Your last sentence says more about you then it does me. Karma my friend.
          Last edited by admin; Mar. 20, 2010, 05:13 PM.
          Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive. Dalai Lama

          Comment


          • #25
            Please keep this thread free of personal attacks on on-topic.

            Moderator 3

            Comment


            • #26
              Traumatic Brain Injury is very long-lasting and usually has permanent effects. Sensitively, we have to be very aware that Courtney may not ever ride at the Olympic Level again. Optimistically, we must try very hard to believe that she will wake up and know who she is, who her family is, and not have to relearn basic tasks again, can hop on a horse and set about riding again very quickly.

              I have had a TBI. It was NOT fun. I was wearing a helmet. It took a very long time to recover. Although physically it appeared that I recovered very quickly. But I knew my mind struggled with basic things. I had to reteach my brain certain things. I had to become very precision-oriented - where things were put, routine and order.

              It put an end to my very promising show jumping career and I could never think about Eventing again. I switched over to pure Dressage instead. And because Dressage is very precision oriented sport, I did very well. And still do very well. I ride and train at the GP level. I choose not to represent my country internationally, because I struggle with the tests from a memory-recall standpoint until I can get that test firmly situated into my long-term memory.

              It made a huge imact on my education. I had to relearn mathematics over again. I, to this day, sometimes struggle in verbal communication. Interestingly, written communication is usually not an issue. But verbally, I struggle with name recall and word recall and sometimes my memory fails me on short term events, but my long-term memory is, as my husband puts it, like a steel trap. Once something gets transferred to long-term memory, I can relate whole conversations absolutely verbatim. But it is surprising what does and does not get put into long-term memory. If something gets stuck in short term memory, well, it's in jeopardy.

              I will mix up the names of people and pets knowing the very second it comes out of my mouth that this is the wrong name or the wrong word and I will have to stop, take a breath, repeat what I wanted to say. My husband frequently has to input a person's name for me - such as a movie star's name like Julia Roberts... A conversation between my husband and I will go like this... "who's the name of that woman who starred in that movie with what's his name... she was a hooker?" He'll say, "Pretty Woman?" I'll say, "Yes that movie." He'll say, "Julia Roberts." "YES!! That's her!" The whole point to get THAT name out was to make mention of the fact that she's in a new movie that I want to go see. It's CRAZY frustrating. But it is a permanent repercussion of my head injury. I struggle with frustration because on some days, particularly when tired, I can't even make a decent conversation. My closest friends all know and are aware. I'm getting braver about bringing it up to someone I don't know as well if I'm having a tough day. I can get really frustrated and it sets me up for a temper flare, all because I am fighting with my brain to cooperate with me and sometimes it just will not. My husband just waits and watches while I fight. He knows not to help me until I ask for help. Because I'm a fighter and have a strong need to do it myself. That's how I survived in the first place!

              That all being said, I am still employed in human medicine. And, there's that issue with the steel trap... when it comes to medicine I'm nearly photographic for my memory. So I do well in that regard. But I do know what kind of struggle Courtney and her family will have once (if) she wakes up. The best case scenario is she will wake up, recognize her family and loved ones and remember events in her life. She may have the odd little issue with quirky communication skills, or higher-functioning logic, etc., but they will remain just that - quirky and easily over-comeable and dealt with by learning various strategies taught by her rehab therapists.

              Worst case scenario is that Courtney will not wake up. This is agonizing to her family.

              Middle ground scenario is that she will wake up with some recognition problems. She may have to relearn how to speak as words come out, but they're scrambled in the wrong order, or using hte wrong words for the meaning (i.e. saying, "red cat and yellow flag room" when she meant to say, "I need to use the washroom". It can and does happen like that with TBI. She may need to learn how to feed herself, relearn how to walk. She may or may not ever get on a horse again. There are varying degrees of severity in all of these features too and I haven't even begun to cover all the possibilities of deficits that could be in play for her. She may very quickly regain skills and lead pretty much a normal life. Those are not things even her doctors or family know until Courtney wakes up and starts communicating.

              Her personality could be different. Radically different. We just don't know. Until she wakes up.

              Although we certainly hope and pray that she not only wakes up, but does indeed ride again, and indeed competes at FEI again, I am quite sure her family and husband has been sat down by her neurologists and neurosurgeons to be very prepared for a very different possibility.

              We hope and pray for the best, but here I have just outlined some of her very really possibile challenges up ahead of her.

              TBI is serious. You can get TBI even with wearing a helmet. A helmet stops your skull from being split open, but it cannot stop your brain from crashing into the inside walls of your skull. Your brain floats on fluid called cerebrospinal fluid, attached to your spinal cord in an area call your brain stem. Its purpose to provide a cushioning barrier between your brain and skull. It can only cushion your brain so much. If the force is very strong, your brain still makes contact with the skull wall. How many times your brain bounced off the inside of your skull determines how many areas of your brain became traumatized and bruised and/or started bleeding. How severe that trauma is depends on whether that portion of the brain dies or not. How much bleeding ensues also determines the extent of the final injury. Sometimes the neurosurgeons can relieve this pressure, but sometimes they cannot. Sometimes, the neurons regrow and synapses are newly formed and/or regenerated, but this is a very, very slow and complicated process and can take a year or more to accomplish. Sometimes they only regenerate partially. Sometimes, the brain uses other areas of itself to remap pathways to achieve function.

              So, we send our very, very best of wishes and prayers to Courtney and her family - but please keep this in mind - Some people cope to their shock using humor. Some get really, really angry. Some people physically lash out. Some people cope using prayer. Some people cope through talking and reaching out to people. Some by withdrawing to inside themselves. Everyone reacts to these things a different way. So, while I appreciate the OP's comments, and the subsequent comments below, we must all keep an open mind that everyone copes in their own ways. Nobody wishes ill or wishes to offend in this particular subject. Of that, I truly believe.
              Last edited by rodawn; Mar. 20, 2010, 06:43 PM. Reason: typos
              Practice! Patience! Persistence!
              http://www.mariposasporthorses.com/
              https://www.facebook.com/MariposaSportHorses/

              Comment


              • #27
                Rodawn, Thank you for sharing that. Some of it brought tears to my eyes -thoughtful, sensitive, informative and well written.
                Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                  Traumatic Brain Injury is very long-lasting and usually has permanent effects. Sensitively, we have to be very aware that Courtney may not ever ride at the Olympic Level again. Optimistically, we must try very hard to believe that she will wake up and know who she is, who her family is, and not have to relearn basic tasks again, can hop on a horse and set about riding again very quickly.

                  I have had a TBI. It was NOT fun. I was wearing a helmet. It took a very long time to recover. Although physically it appeared that I recovered very quickly. But I knew my mind struggled with basic things. I had to reteach my brain certain things. I had to become very precision-oriented - where things were put, routine and order.

                  It put an end to my very promising show jumping career and I could never think about Eventing again. I switched over to pure Dressage instead. And because Dressage is very precision oriented sport, I did very well. And still do very well. I ride and train at the GP level. I choose not to represent my country internationally, because I struggle with the tests from a memory-recall standpoint until I can get that test firmly situated into my long-term memory.

                  It made a huge imact on my education. I had to relearn mathematics over again. I, to this day, sometimes struggle in verbal communication. Interestingly, written communication is usually not an issue. But verbally, I struggle with name recall and word recall and sometimes my memory fails me on short term events, but my long-term memory is, as my husband puts it, like a steel trap. Once something gets transferred to long-term memory, I can relate whole conversations absolutely verbatim. But it is surprising what does and does not get put into long-term memory. If something gets stuck in short term memory, well, it's in jeopardy.

                  I will mix up the names of people and pets knowing the very second it comes out of my mouth that this is the wrong name or the wrong word and I will have to stop, take a breath, repeat what I wanted to say. My husband frequently has to input a person's name for me - such as a movie star's name like Julia Roberts... A conversation between my husband and I will go like this... "who's the name of that woman who starred in that movie with what's his name... she was a hooker?" He'll say, "Pretty Woman?" I'll say, "Yes that movie." He'll say, "Julia Roberts." "YES!! That's her!" The whole point to get THAT name out was to make mention of the fact that she's in a new movie that I want to go see. It's CRAZY frustrating. But it is a permanent repercussion of my head injury. I struggle with frustration because on some days, particularly when tired, I can't even make a decent conversation. My closest friends all know and are aware. I'm getting braver about bringing it up to someone I don't know as well if I'm having a tough day. I can get really frustrated and it sets me up for a temper flare, all because I am fighting with my brain to cooperate with me and sometimes it just will not. My husband just waits and watches while I fight. He knows not to help me until I ask for help. Because I'm a fighter and have a strong need to do it myself. That's how I survived in the first place!

                  That all being said, I am still employed in human medicine. And, there's that issue with the steel trap... when it comes to medicine I'm nearly photographic for my memory. So I do well in that regard. But I do know what kind of struggle Courtney and her family will have once (if) she wakes up. The best case scenario is she will wake up, recognize her family and loved ones and remember events in her life. She may have the odd little issue with quirky communication skills, or higher-functioning logic, etc., but they will remain just that - quirky and easily over-comeable and dealt with by learning various strategies taught by her rehab therapists.

                  Worst case scenario is that Courtney will not wake up. This is agonizing to her family.

                  Middle ground scenario is that she will wake up with some recognition problems. She may have to relearn how to speak as words come out, but they're scrambled in the wrong order, or using hte wrong words for the meaning (i.e. saying, "red cat and yellow flag room" when she meant to say, "I need to use the washroom". It can and does happen like that with TBI. She may need to learn how to feed herself, relearn how to walk. She may or may not ever get on a horse again. There are varying degrees of severity in all of these features too and I haven't even begun to cover all the possibilities of deficits that could be in play for her. She may very quickly regain skills and lead pretty much a normal life. Those are not things even her doctors or family know until Courtney wakes up and starts communicating.

                  Her personality could be different. Radically different. We just don't know. Until she wakes up.

                  Although we certainly hope and pray that she not only wakes up, but does indeed ride again, and indeed competes at FEI again, I am quite sure her family and husband has been sat down by her neurologists and neurosurgeons to be very prepared for a very different possibility.

                  We hope and pray for the best, but here I have just outlined some of her very really possibile challenges up ahead of her.

                  TBI is serious. You can get TBI even with wearing a helmet. A helmet stops your skull from being split open, but it cannot stop your brain from crashing into the inside walls of your skull. Your brain floats on fluid called cerebrospinal fluid, attached to your spinal cord in an area call your brain stem. Its purpose to provide a cushioning barrier between your brain and skull. It can only cushion your brain so much. If the force is very strong, your brain still makes contact with the skull wall. How many times your brain bounced off the inside of your skull determines how many areas of your brain became traumatized and bruised and/or started bleeding. How severe that trauma is depends on whether that portion of the brain dies or not. How much bleeding ensues also determines the extent of the final injury. Sometimes the neurosurgeons can relieve this pressure, but sometimes they cannot. Sometimes, the neurons regrow and synapses are newly formed and/or regenerated, but this is a very, very slow and complicated process and can take a year or more to accomplish. Sometimes they only regenerate partially. Sometimes, the brain uses other areas of itself to remap pathways to achieve function.

                  So, we send our very, very best of wishes and prayers to Courtney and her family - Some people cope to their shock using humor. Some get really, really angry. Some people physically lash out. Some people cope using prayer. Some people cope through talking and reaching out to people. Some by withdrawing to inside themselves. Everyone reacts to these things a different way. So, while I appreciate the OP's comments, and the subsequent comments below, we must all keep an open mind that everyone copes in their own ways. Nobody wishes ill or wishes to offend in this particular subject. Of that, I truly believe.

                  Rodawn thank you so much for this realistic view of things. Although I'm hoping she wakes up and is 100%. It is all in divine order.
                  Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive. Dalai Lama

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    You have a very rare combination of courage and the ability to express yourself, Rodawn. Not to mention an apparently wonderful husband <s> I was thinking as I read your post that you are someone I would like to know.
                    Touchstone Farm. Visit us at the slideshow of our Dutch mares and foals below! 30 mnutes of photos.
                    http://www.smilebox.com/playBlog/4d6...304f513d3d0d0a

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Absolutley spot on Rodawn. I agree with Touchstone, you are someone I would like to know.

                      We don't know what we are facing with Courtney until she wakes. Everyone of us here are dealing with the various stages of grief- denial, anger, depression and acceptance, and going through these phases at different times and more than once. But not knowing what Courtney will face once she wakes makes the waiting harder than you might imagine.

                      That she WILL wake is something we all believe in. Hopefully soon, but only when she is ready.
                      And knowing Courtney, she would be pleased that there is a movement to make wearing a helmet something more people do, that there is discussion about it, that her accident is not in vain.
                      But it is not appropriate to have that discussion on the other thread. Nor is it appropriate to take another poster to task over a percieved slight. The problem with a BB is the fact that the printed word does not convey emotion and is too open to individual interpetation.
                      Maryanna Haymon- Marydell Farm - Home to Don Principe & Doctor Wendell MF
                      www.marydellfarm.com
                      2012 USDF Champion Breeder! 2007, 2011 USEF Champ Breeder
                      2009,2010,2011 USDF Res Breeder of the Year!

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Rodawn, thank you so much for sharing that

                        I had a TBI in 1995 - my math skills since then have been nonexistent, and I become progressively more dyslexic with numbers. I am so sorry that you went through this. It's so difficult for people to understand that yes, you know the sky is blue but you have no control whatsoever at not being able to say "blue" but instead saying "yellow." And so on. The brain is a magic, magic thing and it is an absolute godsend that even seven years later you'll think "Oh gosh, I couldn't do this before." Anyhow, thank you so much for your candor. Crap to go through it, but you have no idea how much it just helped me to learn that I wasn't the only one whose math skills were effected.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                          Traumatic Brain Injury is very long-lasting and usually has permanent effects. Sensitively, we have to be very aware that Courtney may not ever ride at the Olympic Level again. Optimistically, we must try very hard to believe that she will wake up and know who she is, who her family is, and not have to relearn basic tasks again, can hop on a horse and set about riding again very quickly.

                          I have had a TBI. It was NOT fun. I was wearing a helmet. It took a very long time to recover. Although physically it appeared that I recovered very quickly. But I knew my mind struggled with basic things. I had to reteach my brain certain things. I had to become very precision-oriented - where things were put, routine and order.

                          It put an end to my very promising show jumping career and I could never think about Eventing again. I switched over to pure Dressage instead. And because Dressage is very precision oriented sport, I did very well. And still do very well. I ride and train at the GP level. I choose not to represent my country internationally, because I struggle with the tests from a memory-recall standpoint until I can get that test firmly situated into my long-term memory.

                          It made a huge imact on my education. I had to relearn mathematics over again. I, to this day, sometimes struggle in verbal communication. Interestingly, written communication is usually not an issue. But verbally, I struggle with name recall and word recall and sometimes my memory fails me on short term events, but my long-term memory is, as my husband puts it, like a steel trap. Once something gets transferred to long-term memory, I can relate whole conversations absolutely verbatim. But it is surprising what does and does not get put into long-term memory. If something gets stuck in short term memory, well, it's in jeopardy.

                          I will mix up the names of people and pets knowing the very second it comes out of my mouth that this is the wrong name or the wrong word and I will have to stop, take a breath, repeat what I wanted to say. My husband frequently has to input a person's name for me - such as a movie star's name like Julia Roberts... A conversation between my husband and I will go like this... "who's the name of that woman who starred in that movie with what's his name... she was a hooker?" He'll say, "Pretty Woman?" I'll say, "Yes that movie." He'll say, "Julia Roberts." "YES!! That's her!" The whole point to get THAT name out was to make mention of the fact that she's in a new movie that I want to go see. It's CRAZY frustrating. But it is a permanent repercussion of my head injury. I struggle with frustration because on some days, particularly when tired, I can't even make a decent conversation. My closest friends all know and are aware. I'm getting braver about bringing it up to someone I don't know as well if I'm having a tough day. I can get really frustrated and it sets me up for a temper flare, all because I am fighting with my brain to cooperate with me and sometimes it just will not. My husband just waits and watches while I fight. He knows not to help me until I ask for help. Because I'm a fighter and have a strong need to do it myself. That's how I survived in the first place!

                          That all being said, I am still employed in human medicine. And, there's that issue with the steel trap... when it comes to medicine I'm nearly photographic for my memory. So I do well in that regard. But I do know what kind of struggle Courtney and her family will have once (if) she wakes up. The best case scenario is she will wake up, recognize her family and loved ones and remember events in her life. She may have the odd little issue with quirky communication skills, or higher-functioning logic, etc., but they will remain just that - quirky and easily over-comeable and dealt with by learning various strategies taught by her rehab therapists.

                          Worst case scenario is that Courtney will not wake up. This is agonizing to her family.

                          Middle ground scenario is that she will wake up with some recognition problems. She may have to relearn how to speak as words come out, but they're scrambled in the wrong order, or using hte wrong words for the meaning (i.e. saying, "red cat and yellow flag room" when she meant to say, "I need to use the washroom". It can and does happen like that with TBI. She may need to learn how to feed herself, relearn how to walk. She may or may not ever get on a horse again. There are varying degrees of severity in all of these features too and I haven't even begun to cover all the possibilities of deficits that could be in play for her. She may very quickly regain skills and lead pretty much a normal life. Those are not things even her doctors or family know until Courtney wakes up and starts communicating.

                          Her personality could be different. Radically different. We just don't know. Until she wakes up.

                          Although we certainly hope and pray that she not only wakes up, but does indeed ride again, and indeed competes at FEI again, I am quite sure her family and husband has been sat down by her neurologists and neurosurgeons to be very prepared for a very different possibility.

                          We hope and pray for the best, but here I have just outlined some of her very really possibile challenges up ahead of her.

                          TBI is serious. You can get TBI even with wearing a helmet. A helmet stops your skull from being split open, but it cannot stop your brain from crashing into the inside walls of your skull. Your brain floats on fluid called cerebrospinal fluid, attached to your spinal cord in an area call your brain stem. Its purpose to provide a cushioning barrier between your brain and skull. It can only cushion your brain so much. If the force is very strong, your brain still makes contact with the skull wall. How many times your brain bounced off the inside of your skull determines how many areas of your brain became traumatized and bruised and/or started bleeding. How severe that trauma is depends on whether that portion of the brain dies or not. How much bleeding ensues also determines the extent of the final injury. Sometimes the neurosurgeons can relieve this pressure, but sometimes they cannot. Sometimes, the neurons regrow and synapses are newly formed and/or regenerated, but this is a very, very slow and complicated process and can take a year or more to accomplish. Sometimes they only regenerate partially. Sometimes, the brain uses other areas of itself to remap pathways to achieve function.

                          So, we send our very, very best of wishes and prayers to Courtney and her family - but please keep this in mind - Some people cope to their shock using humor. Some get really, really angry. Some people physically lash out. Some people cope using prayer. Some people cope through talking and reaching out to people. Some by withdrawing to inside themselves. Everyone reacts to these things a different way. So, while I appreciate the OP's comments, and the subsequent comments below, we must all keep an open mind that everyone copes in their own ways. Nobody wishes ill or wishes to offend in this particular subject. Of that, I truly believe.
                          Thank you for sharing such intimate details in such well spoken words with such precision. It has been a true education for me and I am painfully realizing how severe the effects of injuries of this nature can be...I can not say enough about your courage to reveal your own situation and to explain the details and complexities you have learned by going through this process. Thank you a million!
                          "the man mite be the head but the woman is the neck and the neck can turn the head any way she wants..." -smart greek woman

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I appreciate the original post and am not sure why it offended some people. While we may disagree about what's appropriate or inappropriate, Molly's Mum made her points in a gentle way. And we have to thank her for opening up the topic and giving us rodawn's excellent post. I DO know everyone copes differently, and that everyone means well, but I also know from first-hand experience that sometimes well-meant comments are hurtful. I'm not saying the one quoted was. I am 100% sure it was meant lovingly.

                            I don't understand the post about "attitude" or exactly what the poster intended to convey. I once participated in a survivors support group led by mental health professionals. When someone suggested "it's all about attitude," the professionals unanimously and emphatically shouted "BS." This is not to say that attitude isn't important, but often those who talk about attitude haven't experienced a life-altering tragedy.

                            I'm lighting candles for Courtney and hoping for the fullest possible recovery!

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              rodawn, thank you. Very helpful, very well said.

                              Another issue here is location, location, location. Some feel the "jingles" thread should be just that, others feel it is not at all inappropriate to ask questions there, or make other statements. Alas, none of us can dictate how others feel about these ideas. A majority may agree on some point, but we cannot force that opinion on someone else.

                              That said, first-hand information--Coreene, rodawn, others--is most helpful. I was hoping that was what this thread would be about. I think it's telling that, for the most part, the medical people stay away from this topic. There are very good and valid reasons for this, and the rest of us should take note of it. Public figure or not, the details of Courtney's situation are NOT our business (not my opinion, but the dictates and ethics of the medical professions). We will just have to wait, see what happens and see what she and those around her choose to share (personally, I think they're doing a darned fine job).

                              Interesting what this kind of situation reveals about the abilities of individuals to cope with that sucky reality. No one is right or wrong, just different.
                              "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

                              Spay and neuter. Please.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                                <SNIP> I struggle with frustration because on some days, particularly when tired, I can't even make a decent conversation. My closest friends all know and are aware. I'm getting braver about bringing it up to someone I don't know as well if I'm having a tough day. I can get really frustrated and it sets me up for a temper flare, all because I am fighting with my brain to cooperate with me and sometimes it just will not. .
                                My mom had a non malignant brain tumor and the surgery to remove it damaged the speech center in her brain. When she woke up from her coma she could not say a word. It probably took a year of thrice weekly speach therapy for her to produce an understandable word. She knew what she wanted to say but was unable to form the words.
                                It was very frustrating both for her and the people around her. We learned to shape conversations to make it easier for her to participate. If we knew she said "I need to go to the grocery store " someone would reply "OK we can go to the grocery store on the way to the hardware store". However she could not drive because she had also lost the ability to process information in a timely manner and if someone said "I can't take you to the grocery store today because " or cross her in any way she would throw a very dramatic temper tantrum.

                                One thing that she found the hardest was that people who didn't know her would exclude her from conversations and talk around her because it was such an effort to communicate with her.

                                She had always been an avid reader but found it difficult to concentrate. She progressed from magazines to Readers Digest Condensed books to being able to read simpler novels by the time she died. She could understand Dick Frances but not something like The Davinci Code

                                In 15 years she had regained much of her ability to communicate. She described it as living in a foreign land where no one spoke her language. Even at the end of her life time she was still making gradual improvements. People who hadn't talked with her in a month would be able to notice.

                                However when the tumor came back she refused surgery.

                                Age makes a difference, she was 65 when the tumor was discovered, and her support system is critical. My father and I and even our young children fought for her recovery. At the time my mom had her surgery my MIL's neighbor had a stroke. She was about the same age and had a similar level of disability. She was promptly put into a nursing home and died less than a year later
                                Last edited by carolprudm; Mar. 21, 2010, 09:20 AM. Reason: spelling
                                I wasn't always a Smurf
                                Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
                                "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                                The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by Discobold View Post
                                  I appreciate the original post and am not sure why it offended some people. While we may disagree about what's appropriate or inappropriate, Molly's Mum made her points in a gentle way. And we have to thank her for opening up the topic and giving us rodawn's excellent post. I DO know everyone copes differently, and that everyone means well, but I also know from first-hand experience that sometimes well-meant comments are hurtful. I'm not saying the one quoted was. I am 100% sure it was meant lovingly.

                                  I don't understand the post about "attitude" or exactly what the poster intended to convey. I once participated in a survivors support group led by mental health professionals. When someone suggested "it's all about attitude," the professionals unanimously and emphatically shouted "BS." This is not to say that attitude isn't important, but often those who talk about attitude haven't experienced a life-altering tragedy.

                                  I'm lighting candles for Courtney and hoping for the fullest possible recovery!
                                  _______________

                                  I posted the comment about "attitude".....rec'd it in an email from a friend and found it applicable....btw, THANK you to the poster who credited the correct author!

                                  Your statment above "often thos who talk about attitude haven't experienced a life-altering tragedy" seem to be implying an assumption on your part that may or may not be true.......BUT...imho, it is totally irrelevant to this topic. However, you are certainly within your rights to express a differeing opinion, even one based on assumptions that may be valid when your perspective and own life experiences are accounted for.......

                                  Many thanks to all who have contributed such inspiring and educational contributions!

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    The company I used to work for held a seminar for its employees with Charles Swindoll and it was ( I hate to use this expression) "Life changing" primarily due to that piece "Attitude".


                                    It's one of my favorite quotes, along with "When I am an old Horsewoman" and I was blasted for posting that without attribution. It's by Patty Barnhart.

                                    But if you look at my mother's experience compared to MIL's neighbor the attitude of her caregivers, both professional and family had a LOT to do with her quality of life.

                                    My dad was one of the smartest people I have known and since I am married to a nuclear engineer that's saying something. He could pretty much figure out whatever he needed to do and there was never any question that my mom was going to have a quality of life.

                                    Unfortunately he failed to mention that he was peeing blood at the time
                                    I wasn't always a Smurf
                                    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
                                    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                                    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      I think most of us have never personally dealt with an injury of this type. I hope I never do. However, in trying to understand this type of injury, having personal accounts of the effects is so very helpful. Each injury of this type is probably like a snowflake, not like any other - ever. I had no idea how much it effects information processing and how much you have to adapt and persevere. Unbelieveable. Information like this helps all of us to appreciate everything CKD and her family/friends are living through - yesterday, today and subsequent tomorrows.
                                      Some days the best thing about my job is that the chair spins.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Brain Injury

                                        I just wanted to say I think that everyone has a way of praying and responding to someone who is in the hospital or is sick. I have a very dear friend who has a tramatic brain injury now, he is getting ready to go to rehab next week. A difficult journey for the family and for us friends.

                                        I am a very serious person, but have a sense of humor as well. My best friend is by her husband's side every moment, and she so appreciates to read some funny stuff. Her day is filled with so many occurences that she needs to just laugh to help her through this difficult journey. I always end my journal entry(Caringbridge.org) to her with some very funny characters, it makes her day. EVERYONE'S PRAYERS COUNT, NO MATTER HOW THEY COME.

                                        I pray for Courtney every day and cheer her baby steps. Every little move, is a blessing.

                                        Colleen
                                        Dressageforjuniors.com

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          OMG, Colleen I was just going to share the same about Doug (need to update his thread of Off Course too). He's another great example of how the brain keeps ticking away with trying to fix itself. I lost all sense of taste and smell for ages, but that slowly repaired too (though I can only smell through right nostril), as the sliced nerves slowly reattached. I played many games of that memory thing with cards - you know, where you put a deck of cards upside down and pick up pairs, having to remember where they are. One of those funny little suggestions that someone made, and it went from a source of frustration to a giant accomplishment. I was so blessed and so fortunate. Almost dying puts the rest of your life into an entirely new perspective, when you never forget that each and every moment you are given for the rest of your life is a 100% gold medal wininng perfect ride.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X