• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Define "Dressage Queen"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Define "Dressage Queen"

    I am writing an essay and need a good working definition of the term "dressage queen".

    Anyone care to define it?
    Sheilah

  • #2
    LOL. I'd love to read that essay!

    Someone else might have a better idea, but to my mind it is a slightly derogatory term that implies the woman is so obsessed with dressage that she looks down at any other kind of riding/training (even if she doesn't know much about any other kind), and more than that, she is super obsessed with having very trendy, expensive things (saddle, clothing, horse) and likes people to know she associates with big name trainers... that sort of thing.

    Comment


    • #3
      I was a DQ for Halloween! Think matching Tiara's for me and my horse (because a true DQ will have a horse who is equally as stuck-up), Lots of champion ribbons (they always have to win), Pink polo wraps (pink is a princess color, and DQ's think they are royalty), a saddle pad with a sponsor's logo on it, a dressage at devon ball cap (DQ goes not to ride, but for the social aspect), and a perfectly groomed and braided horse. Oh, and a groom in attendance.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Good job! Keep 'em coming! This is going to be awesome.
        Sheilah

        Comment


        • #5
          Dressage Queens are Drama Queens with horses, often with more money than sense.
          The journey is the destination.

          Comment


          • #6
            People who take dressage (and themselves) waaaaay too seriously.

            DQ's can be either sex.
            Last edited by ThreeFigs; Nov. 23, 2009, 05:54 PM. Reason: added thought

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a friend who defines DQs in two ways:

              1. GOOD DQs - those with the FEI level knowledge, excellent riders, good horsemen/horsewomen. Those who have "earned their stripes."

              2. BAD DQs - the wannabes with money; the ones who can ride decently but ride then sell horse after horse and buy another if they don't win; the ones who are good riders, but treat anyone who is "less" than they in supposed accomplishment like dirt; the spank and crankers - who are usually the ones that are constantly having to get new horses.... you get the picture.

              Heck, a friend of mine who is a GOOD DQ - took a little halter/racing cross 15.2 QH to PSG - always swore she was going to get license plates that said "DQFRMHEL". ROFLOL

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Sandy M View Post
                I have a friend who defines DQs in two ways:

                1. GOOD DQs - those with the FEI level knowledge, excellent riders, good horsemen/horsewomen. Those who have "earned their stripes."

                2. BAD DQs - the wannabes with money; the ones who can ride decently but ride then sell horse after horse and buy another if they don't win; the ones who are good riders, but treat anyone who is "less" than they in supposed accomplishment like dirt; the spank and crankers - who are usually the ones that are constantly having to get new horses.... you get the picture.

                Heck, a friend of mine who is a GOOD DQ - took a little halter/racing cross 15.2 QH to PSG - always swore she was going to get license plates that said "DQFRMHEL". ROFLOL
                I agree with this...except I have adorned the "Good DQ's" with the name "Dressage Divas", so there is no confusion, !
                I told you: "inside leg to outside rein, not inside leg to outside rail!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Women who think, if they buy a Warmblood, their poop doesn't stink And it starts smelling GOOOOOD when they add bling to their browband.

                  Oh, and most of them don't know how to pick out hooves or groom a dirty horse. Their custom Petries are always shiny, their Pikeur breeches are always spotless (easy to do when someone else grooms and tacks your horse), and no helmet smashes their carefully coifed hair.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Best explained with a little horse humor:

                    THE DRESSAGE QUEEN:
                    Has her hair in an elegant ponytail and is wearing a visor and gold earrings sporting a breed logo. A $100 dollar custom jumper ( also with breed logo) is worn over $300 dollar full-seat white breeches and custom Koenigs.
                    Her horse, "Leistergeidelsprundheim" ("Fleistergeidel" for short) is a 17.3 hand warmblood who was bred to be a Grand Prix horse.
                    The Germans are still laughing hysterically, as he was bred to be a Grand Prix JUMPER, but since he couldn't get out of his own way, they sold him to an American. His rider fell in love with his lofty gaits, proud carriage, and tremendous athleticism.
                    She admires him mostly while lunging.
                    She lunges him a lot, because she is not actually too keen to get up there and try to SIT that trot. When she rides, it's not for long, because (while he looks FINE to everyone else), she can tell that he is not as "thorough" and "supple" as he should be, and gets off to call the chiropractor/massage therapist/psychic, all of which is expensive, but he WILL be shown, and shown right after he perfects (fill in the blank).
                    The (blank) changes often enough that the rider can avoid the stress of being beaten at Training 1 by a Quarter Horse.
                    ... It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that Shwung

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I always associate DQs with pearls. A lot of the DQs I've run across wear pearls. And actually wear make-up when they ride.
                      "I was not expecting the park rangers to lead the resistance, none of the dystopian novels I read prepared me for this but cool."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mor4ward View Post
                        Best explained with a little horse humor:

                        THE DRESSAGE QUEEN:
                        Has her hair in an elegant ponytail and is wearing a visor and gold earrings sporting a breed logo. A $100 dollar custom jumper ( also with breed logo) is worn over $300 dollar full-seat white breeches and custom Koenigs.
                        Her horse, "Leistergeidelsprundheim" ("Fleistergeidel" for short) is a 17.3 hand warmblood who was bred to be a Grand Prix horse.
                        The Germans are still laughing hysterically, as he was bred to be a Grand Prix JUMPER, but since he couldn't get out of his own way, they sold him to an American. His rider fell in love with his lofty gaits, proud carriage, and tremendous athleticism.
                        She admires him mostly while lunging.
                        She lunges him a lot, because she is not actually too keen to get up there and try to SIT that trot. When she rides, it's not for long, because (while he looks FINE to everyone else), she can tell that he is not as "thorough" and "supple" as he should be, and gets off to call the chiropractor/massage therapist/psychic, all of which is expensive, but he WILL be shown, and shown right after he perfects (fill in the blank).
                        The (blank) changes often enough that the rider can avoid the stress of being beaten at Training 1 by a Quarter Horse.
                        This is my favorite!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Search this forum for the long dressage queen thread that ran a couple of years ago. I think it is called "What makes a DQ?.

                          Have fun!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I actually HAD "Leistergeidelsprundheim" after she sold him to me . He was a splendid horse and turned out to be quite the nice young man once he got over his fear of cows, and quite normal, too. He dirtied up quite nicely... :P

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think a DQ has an attitude of superiority about herself, her horse and what she does in dressage and in the horseworld in general. She is demanding and overbearing about anything to do with herself and her horse at home or in a show/clinic situation. She is perfectionist (in her own mind), fussy to the point of boorishness and intolerant of others who she looks down upon. You can't tell her anything because she already knows it all. She is also demeaning of others' horses, tack, attire and anything else she cares to comment about. Doesn't win alot of friends. That's in the most negative sense. I agree, some "DQs" are likeable and deserve to be -- it's usually the wannabes that are described in the negative way.
                              PennyG

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I think many DQs actually buy new tack rather than clean the tack they own since their grooms aren't always around to do it for them. And said tack is always a gazillion dollars and the favored brand name of the moment. (I say this thinking of one person I know )
                                My blog:

                                RAWR

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by IdahoRider View Post
                                  I am writing an essay and need a good working definition of the term "dressage queen".

                                  Anyone care to define it?
                                  Sheilah
                                  well,in all honesty the ones who have garnered that title for me, have been passive aggressive attention seekers who have failed at something else and moved to horses for entertainment...money buys the look but not the skill and they don't "get" that memo....

                                  the riders and horsemen don't seek attention and when their horse does badly take it very much on themselves as to how they could have improved things..other folks,not so much them as blaming the crowd noise,the horses hormones,the weather,the saddle,the angle of the sun as it hit the judges booth and on and on and on...

                                  best
                                  Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                                  I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by TKR View Post
                                    I think a DQ has an attitude of superiority about herself, her horse and what she does in dressage and in the horseworld in general. She is demanding and overbearing about anything to do with herself and her horse at home or in a show/clinic situation. She is perfectionist (in her own mind), fussy to the point of boorishness and intolerant of others who she looks down upon. You can't tell her anything because she already knows it all.
                                    I know someone like this. She doesn't even really ride. But yeah. I think "Dressage Queen" and I think of someone like her.
                                    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
                                    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Pretty much what everyone else has already said ...

                                      At our barn we have 2 definitions of a DQ:

                                      1) Someone who has so much money she thinks $1900 is cheap for a secondhand saddle, who calls every horse that isn't a 17+-hand WB a "cute little horse" (and genuinely thinks she is giving a sincere compliment!), who rides at such high levels she can't be bothered to help out at barn schooling shows, unlike most of the other boarders, and who cannot see past the end of her turned-up nose to realize what life is like in the non-DQ world.

                                      2) Someone who paid around $50,000 for an import that was rejected by its native European country's breed registry and was sold to an American (like "Fleister" in a previous post), who pays a trainer to come to her barn and school her horse but rarely rides him herself, who--when she does ride--spends her entire 15 minutes of ride time schooling circles at the trot and has not cantered since the day she decided to ride outside the arena and her horse bolted across the pasture.

                                      Not that these are necessarily people the rest of us look down on--it's more a case of we feel kinda sorry for them and wish they would walk into the real world and get their boots and their horse's white polo wraps a little grubby! We would welcome them with open arms!
                                      Rack on!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        DQ's

                                        This is killing me. I've known so many dq's that i try so hard
                                        to do everything the opposite. As I've matured, I've realized
                                        the best success is staying in the saddle when your young
                                        warmblood you should have resisted buying is bucking and/or
                                        twirling. I'm just trying to survive these days. No room for
                                        attitude here, but I sure know alot of dq's. I think the best
                                        way to sum it up is that dq's think they are superior to everyone else. And there are plenty of dressage trainers
                                        at the upper levels that represent that. All you have to
                                        do is go watch in Wellington or Devon. Kind of makes you
                                        want to throw up. Dressage doesn't have a welcoming
                                        personality to it as represented by the people involved.
                                        Too much arrogance!
                                        LISA

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X