• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Spinoff: Why not ride in groups?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Spinoff: Why not ride in groups?

    Originally posted by BaroquePony View Post
    Having 5 or 6 riders in the ring at the same time doesn't sound appealing to me at all...
    Hm, this is something I have noticed -- that ***some*** dressage riders really don't like (and sometimes fear) riding in an arena with other horses, your standard equitation/pleasure class. It's completely different than the chaos of the warm-up ring where people are going in all directions, of very different levels of skill etc. But there seems to be a very negative attitude in some quarters, even towards group lessons with 3 or so riders. (I happen to like group lessons because the instructor's focus is not constantly on me...)

    I'm on, well, not a break from dressage but a "let's try other things" phase, and am taking maresy to a little open show this weekend to do the novice pleasure and eq classes (in dressage tack, they said it's fine.) She's done hunter under saddle (before I bought her), so I think we'll be OK. I'm mostly doing it for fun and to expand our horizons a bit.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

  • #2
    It is just a different skill than dressage riders usually practice. If the idea is to test the riding done in dressage, an atmosphere similar to what people usually ride in would be better wouldn't it?

    How do you do lateral movements? One at a time, obviously- so why not do everyone separately?

    Comment


    • #3
      I rode in a group dressage class in ATL. It was ok.

      I prefer individual lessons because I get more attention and more education.

      When I rode hunters, we were in group lessons, which was also fine and nice to take a break while we watched other riders do courses.

      I think there are good things about both individual and group lessons. It seems to me that 'most' dressage training is set up to provide individual lessons.

      Are you asking about showing in group classes as well?

      I've only seen young horse 'material' classes go in groups of 3. Seemed to work pretty well and had the added benefit of being able to compare horses in vivo, as well as seeing how well they could ignore each other

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by quietann View Post
        Hm, this is something I have noticed -- that ***some*** dressage riders really don't like (and sometimes fear) riding in an arena with other horses, your standard equitation/pleasure class. It's completely different than the chaos of the warm-up ring where people are going in all directions, of very different levels of skill etc. But there seems to be a very negative attitude in some quarters, even towards group lessons with 3 or so riders. (I happen to like group lessons because the instructor's focus is not constantly on me...)
        I grew up riding Western and our lessons were always 10+ kids in a group. I showed Western Equitation and Pleasure and stuff, so I'm kinda used to this idea. Doesn't bother me at all.

        Many of my lessons are in groups of 5 and some are privates. Sometimes I "sneak" into the arena while the student a couple of levels ahead of me is getting a private and ride and "listen" at the same time She and the trainer don't mind, so long as I stay out of the way.

        Then again, I'm not all about competition, but just the learning journey itself.

        I'm on, well, not a break from dressage but a "let's try other things" phase, and am taking maresy to a little open show this weekend to do the novice pleasure and eq classes (in dressage tack, they said it's fine.) She's done hunter under saddle (before I bought her), so I think we'll be OK. I'm mostly doing it for fun and to expand our horizons a bit.
        I'd like to try this, too. For the spooky-type horse, riding in a group setting can even have a calming effect.

        Eileen
        Mad Mare™ Studio
        Custom Swarovski®, Czech glass and gemstone browbands in Circlet, Diadem and Tiara styles. Matching stock pins, bracelets and belts.
        http://MadMare.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by quietann View Post
          Hm, this is something I have noticed -- that ***some*** dressage riders really don't like (and sometimes fear) riding in an arena with other horses, your standard equitation/pleasure class. It's completely different than the chaos of the warm-up ring where people are going in all directions, of very different levels of skill etc. But there seems to be a very negative attitude in some quarters, even towards group lessons with 3 or so riders. (I happen to like group lessons because the instructor's focus is not constantly on me...)

          I'm on, well, not a break from dressage but a "let's try other things" phase, and am taking maresy to a little open show this weekend to do the novice pleasure and eq classes (in dressage tack, they said it's fine.) She's done hunter under saddle (before I bought her), so I think we'll be OK. I'm mostly doing it for fun and to expand our horizons a bit.
          I don't come from a dressage background and really don't mind sharing an arena with other riders -- a good thing, since I don't have much of a choice.

          What I've noticed is that if I'm sharing with other dressage-y types, we can usually figure out what we're working on -- e.g., shoulder-in, haunches-in, loops, circles -- and stay out of each other's way. People who aren't familiar with those figures usually cannot, so it can get a little frustrating. I'll usually just call out what I'm doing, although that doesn't always work either, since they don't know what I'm talking about to begin with.

          re: showing your horse in a rail class. Good for you! I'm going to a breed show this weekend and showing in Hunter Pleasure. They're a breeze compared to dressage shows. Have fun!

          ETA -- I don't mind group lessons, either. But not on a regular basis. I can always watch other people's lessons if I want to learn by seeing.
          __________________________
          "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
          the best day in ten years,
          you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

          Comment


          • #6
            The main advantage of riding in groups is you can learn from watching each other, but I imagine it would be a lot harder to do this when you start doing upper level work, as the trainer really needs to focus on the pair for every movement. But at the lower levels, I would think a class of 2-4 would be easily manageable.
            Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
            Witherun Farm
            http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              I started that line of discussion, so it's all my fault.

              I can ride in a group, and I don't mind it at all. I grew up in the hunters, with the crowded chaos of both the schooling ring and the flat classes.

              BUT. A dressage arena is much smaller than the typical hunter arena, and it's much more challenging to do anything other than ride on the rail in a small area. Only two people can be doing 20m circles at a time in a large court - one at a time in a small court. In the hunter arena I grew up in, maybe 10 people could circle at once with no traffic worries.

              For the situation described, which is an equitation flat class, I'm just not interested in riding for a judge as a group. To me the essence of dressage is how well you ride while trying to ride a set pattern, and I would quite enjoy being judged on my riding in that situation, rather than just trotting around.
              If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

              Comment


              • #8
                You will see some dressage clinics run sessions with two riders at the same time, ordinarily no higher than training or 1st level. Beyond that level, you are lengthening and shortening the stride and using the whole arena to do figures, movements etc.

                I find that even riding in an indoor with more than just one or two other horses can be really frustrating when trying to school more than just long and low work. You and the horse both have to really focus on what you are doing and not the traffic (or in the horse's case "the herd dynamics.")

                When you are at a warm up in a show, neither the horse nor the rider should be schooling or training things that are not yet confirmed. Warm ups at shows can still be nightmares--the last show I was at I pulled my horse out and sacrificed my warm up rather than risk someone being hurt.
                "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by poltroon View Post
                  I'm just not interested in riding for a judge as a group.
                  But the Arabian people have the BEST parties.

                  If only the dressage show folks were half as much fun ...
                  __________________________
                  "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
                  the best day in ten years,
                  you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mp View Post
                    But the Arabian people have the BEST parties.

                    If only the dressage show folks were half as much fun ...

                    I thought that was why they invented FIELD HUNTING. Heh, heh, heh. Now THAT's riding in a group!
                    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That came from the context of showing and how a rider effectiveness class would operate. I think 3 or 4 is a fine number -- more than that would be too many in a ring and might just lead to the most noticable horses doing better than the less noticable horses. But I think the advantages over individual classes are 1) I think riding with other people provides another layer of challenge and I think it's an important skill to have and to show that you have 2) you could get through more riders more quickly so it would be practical and time-effective if scheduling the judge or adding more classes or having ring space is an issue.

                      For lessons -- I love group or semiprivate lessons with 1 or 2 other people, although I like private lessons, too. I like to learn from others, I like the social aspect, on some horses I feel like they like the social aspect, and I think there are some skills involved in riding with a group that are useful. I've done some group lessons where the instructor broke each person out for 5 minutes to work with them one-on-one and I find that really effective because it gives you time to practice on your own what you were working on with your instructor while it's still fresh in your memory.

                      For practice rides -- Honestly, especially when some of the people riding are much better than me, I kind of feel honored to be working on my stuff while they're working on their stuff.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Dressage lessons I have taken have always been a combination. Some days of the week in a small group, some days private lessons. The nice part of a group lesson is that your horse gets some small breaks, so you can have more instruction time. If you drive in for lessons, it's nice to get one hour of teach time vs. half an hour...time is limited in private lessons by your horse's fitness and your individual ability to soak up direct instruction.

                        I have also never trained in an actual Dressage school...we use our entire arena, which is much bigger. The school ring stuff really only comes out for shows.
                        Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
                          I thought that was why they invented FIELD HUNTING. Heh, heh, heh. Now THAT's riding in a group!
                          But the last time I showed, Arabian people didn't party WHILE they rode. Only before and after.
                          __________________________
                          "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
                          the best day in ten years,
                          you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mp View Post
                            But the last time I showed, Arabian people didn't party WHILE they rode. Only before and after.

                            Good point. That's why the horses follow the hounds--at least someone knows where they are going!!
                            "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've taken jumper group lessons, and half the time you sit around waiting for the other riders to do their stuff. That would drive me nuts if it was the standard MO for my lessons. And we do ride with more than one horse in the arena
                              "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I am fine riding in groups I guess because when I was younger I rode hunters and the lessons were always in groups. However now that I'm riding in a barn where there are not a many dressage riders I think just one or two others. Some people get intimidated when I have a really big trot going and I am doing patterns. I think some people are not as familiar with left shoulder to left shoulder and they think that I'm going to run them over. So I always try to explain that my horse has excellent brakes and moves of the leg very easily. If that dose not help then I just try to ride at later times when the ring is less crowded. There are a lot of people that get a little weird if you leave the rail.
                                Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death.
                                -Auntie Mame

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I think riding in a group (whether at home or at a show) is a very very useful skill. I grew up riding saddle seat, so the warm up rings were CROWDED and fast paced and very often the show ring was as well. A good rider needs to be able to navigate the ring so that the judge can see your horse. No matter how great your horse is, you aren't getting a great ribbon if the judge can't see you = )

                                  So that's a neat skill to have I think. I never ever feel intimidated if I have to be in close quarters while I'm riding at home or in the warm up at a show. It's also VERY good for your horse to learn not to freak when another horse gets too close or has to pass a little closer than you'd like.

                                  As far as group lessons, meh. I think they can be very useful, but other disciplines are more suited to group lessons. Once you've learned the basics in dressage, a large group is going to make it difficult to progress and practice certain things. Though if you're in a very large ring, a small group lesson can work out pretty well and is certainly beneficial every now and again. It's good for the rider to see other horses and riders doing similar things. Groups are also GREAT for beginners that need to work on keeping their eyes up and steering their horse, haha.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I was raised in the hunter world where schooling arenas are coordinated chaos with people jumping across each other's paths, etc.

                                    At the barn where I did my junior years three large show barns shared a medium sized indoor and it was not unusual to ride two abreast on the rail with people jumping in the middle.


                                    I find sharing an arena with ONE other dressage rider, however, very difficult.
                                    Horses are not always ridden in the direction they are looking, so when I am coming up the quarterline and somebody initiates shoulder-in it is difficult to determine whether they will be halfpassing, travelling down the diagonal, or carrying on straight down the long side in the next five strides.

                                    Then someone starts doing zig zags and takes up the entire middle of the arena and I have no idea where to go to avoid them. Every time I try to go somewhere else, there they are again!
                                    The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                                    Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                                    Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                                    The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                                      I was raised in the hunter world where schooling arenas are coordinated chaos with people jumping across each other's paths, etc.

                                      At the barn where I did my junior years three large show barns shared a medium sized indoor and it was not unusual to ride two abreast on the rail with people jumping in the middle.


                                      I find sharing an arena with ONE other dressage rider, however, very difficult.
                                      Horses are not always ridden in the direction they are looking, so when I am coming up the quarterline and somebody initiates shoulder-in it is difficult to determine whether they will be halfpassing, travelling down the diagonal, or carrying on straight down the long side in the next five strides.

                                      Then someone starts doing zig zags and takes up the entire middle of the arena and I have no idea where to go to avoid them. Every time I try to go somewhere else, there they are again!
                                      Yup. The only thing that's worse is sharing a ring with western reiners. First they are facing one way, then they are facing the other and they don't put on their turn signals, let alone their brake lights!
                                      "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Ive ridden numerous styles of riding, and have been totally comfortable in groups, but when studying dressage, your horse demands 100% of your attention.
                                        More than jumping a course with 6 other ambling around the arena, more so than hunter on the flat, moreso than jogging along in western pleasure, and more than when riding saddleseat/gaiteds.
                                        are some dressage riders chickens about a group because of fear? Yeah, sure, but not all. I'll ride my horse in a group of 20 without tack and be totally comfortable, but if i'm doing a shoulder in on a circle stay the F away from me!
                                        www.destinationconsensusequus.com
                                        chaque pas est fait ensemble

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X