• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Critique/advice **Show results in post 34 AND now pics**

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Critique/advice **Show results in post 34 AND now pics**

    We (my 5 yr. old mare and I) have our first dressage show this weekend. Today we had our worst school so far. I had someone videoing today, so I might as well post while I have a few days left to school.
    We are doing intro. B and Training 1. She is spooking in the video at yard work going on behind the person videoing. I am now pretty sure she will be spooking at the judges stand etc. if she is this easily distracted.

    Any advice on what I can work on this week would be greatly appreciated. I've reverted to some bad habits today since I was so focused on the spooking. No excuses I know... it was a learning experience for sure.

    Intro. B http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiJIMqhl3g8

    Training 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usUPBdspV68
    Last edited by VTHokie; Sep. 21, 2009, 10:58 PM.

  • #2
    IDK, it seems that whenever I have a couple of lousy schools the week before the show, the show goes better than if he schools GREAT all week. Lower expectations=less pressure, maybe.

    Just ride the rest of the week as if today never happened, and no matter what happens at the show, remember that you will never have to endure your first test in your first show again.

    Comment


    • #3
      I didn't see any naughty behavior in the intro B video- your horse is just curious and wants to look at whats making the noise. Just remember to put your inside leg on and push the horse towards anything they want to look at. You can use your inside rein as well to create a little bit of inside bend. In order to practice the aids, turn a little early in the corners- as if you were going to cut them just a little. Then push the horse out into the corner with your inside leg. Thats the feeling you need to create when the horse wants to look at the scary monster at C. Turn the head in/away, and push the body towards the monster.

      Your horse is adorable and I'm sure the show will be fine. Some horses just need mileage, so if it doesn't go as well as you hoped- chalk it up as "one for the team" that had to happen eventually and know the next one will only get better.

      Comment


      • #4
        That's your worst ever? I thought it was quite decent for that level.

        I did worry about the video person getting run over by that mower or whatever in the background, though. It sounded like it was coming closer!

        Your straight lines are pretty darn straight, the circles appear to be round, etc.. The horse keeps a nice steady rhythm 99% of the time, and corrects quickly when you ask. The "spook" was barely a glance (a little wiggly wiggly with your finger on the inside rein to keep her attention before she starts looking would probably be enough). Where the transition walk to trot is a little rough, (I only watched the first video), it's just a matter of softening your arms and using your seat/leg in a gradually increasing way, perhaps? Like you asked her a little too suddenly, and then she raised her head because it was a little uncoordinated between your seat/leg and hands.

        Overall I think you ride a little bit "rolled forward" with your hands a little low, but I've seen worse. It's helped me to think about the reins running all the way up my arms to my shoulders and beyond into my back, rather than something I hold in my hands. Or some people find it useful to think of sitting like a princess, a little more raised up in the chest, upper body floating, hands carrying two glasses of wine. It's perhaps an exaggeration (and if you overdo it then it's just stiff and silly looking), but I've found it useful. Perhaps between now and your show is not the time to worry about overall position - that takes time and video/mirrors to work on.

        She looks like a comfortable horse to ride and a cutey-pie, and quite happy in her work. Good luck!

        Comment


        • #5
          OK, allow me to call you out on something. I watched your videos.

          Your mare looked at the machinery behind the videographer a couple of times. Your mare spooked once when you started the canter work. You brought her back very nicely. Ummmmm, what are you worried about? You guys look great and you have done your homework.

          Clearly, you and your mare are on the same page. She listens to you. I'm guessing that the judges stand will be peanuts compared to loud and noisy farm machinery. If you feel nervous, she will feel nervous. If you ride her as if to say "Awww, come on, that's nothing" she will likely think "hmmm, it's probably nothing".

          Also, if you get there the day before or before the show starts, you can hand walk her around the ring and show her the judges stand before you have to ride in the ring. I have put sugar cubes or pepperments on the judges table or inside the stand for nervous horses and let them grab them. I have stood in the stand or asked others to stand in the stand while walking the horse by and assuring that there's not a big deal. I have stood in the judges stand for other people's hot horses (even for strangers) and dispensed treats when they got used to the box enough to stick the nose in. Associating a dark scary stand with treats or pats or scratches really changes a horse's attitude when they are new to the whole scene. I never underestimate the power of treats. Before-the-show preparation like this can make all the difference in the world. But I must say that your girl really seems to trust you already. So have faith in her!

          I rode a OTTB mare who was very hot during pecan farming around our ring. She was nervous about it...but after that she really believed that it WOULD be OK if I said it was OK. Pecan harvesting machinery is very odd looking.

          Good luck this weekend and have a good time with your mare. You guys will be fine!

          J.
          Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation

          Comment


          • #6
            VT, just watched your intro video- it looked lovely and very relaxed! I think you'll do great

            Comment


            • #7
              Awwwww. She's adorable! So wide!

              I am not the one to "critique" as I am at about the same level as you are -- but keep in mind, Intro tests are for the young and the new Many people would say the same of Training, especially T1 and T2.

              I didn't watch each video all the way through, but I think you handled the spook in T1, at the trot-canter transition towards the end, very well. You kept your leg on and kept her forward, even though she'd jumped sideways. I think that when they spook, especially a spook like this where it's over pretty quickly, you just keep going.

              If she gets "looky" -- keep her going forward and if you can, turn her head away from what she's looking at. Yes, it will likely lower your score, but it's a good teaching experience for her.

              I did exactly this with my mare -- who can be quite hot and spooky and is much more of a "sports car" than your mare -- today, passing some trash cans on the road. Turned her head away, kept her moving forward, accepted some sideways along with the forward. Coming back, she was much better -- still looky, but we had more forward and less sideways.

              You'll hear from a lot of people -- and I agree -- get her out, take her places, let her see a lot of stuff so she learns there is not so much to worry about. I had a lot of help from a trainer for this and am very satisfied with our progress.

              It's about your confidence as much as hers.

              Here's a recent thread about spooky horses: http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum...d.php?t=219966

              And one I started, about my horse being very very bad at a clinic with a big name trainer:
              http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum...d.php?t=209746

              Good luck!
              You have to have experiences to gain experience.

              1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by J-Lu View Post
                Also, if you get there the day before or before the show starts, you can hand walk her around the ring and show her the judges stand before you have to ride in the ring. I have put sugar cubes or pepperments on the judges table or inside the stand for nervous horses and let them grab them. I have stood in the stand or asked others to stand in the stand while walking the horse by and assuring that there's not a big deal. I have stood in the judges stand for other people's hot horses (even for strangers) and dispensed treats when they got used to the box enough to stick the nose in. Associating a dark scary stand with treats or pats or scratches really changes a horse's attitude when they are new to the whole scene. I never underestimate the power of treats. Before-the-show preparation like this can make all the difference in the world. But I must say that your girl really seems to trust you already. So have faith in her!
                .
                Hmm..I hadn't thought of what happens before the show starts. Is it usually allowed for riders to go in the arena before it starts? The treat thing could work.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  What? No bucking? No jumping around because a horse eating monster is coming after her? NO flipping around with one leg up over her head trying to get a biting fly? LOL! That was my ride today. And believe me that isn't distracted . You've got a precious gem. You will do absolutely fine. Since your mare is used to riding by herself she probably won't be looking for other horses in the ring, but that does bother some right at first.
                  Susan B.
                  http://canterberrymeadows.com/

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    The bigger spook in the Training 1 video is actually not even machinery at that point. Someone is going in and out of the bushes with a weed spayer.
                    It's just been a bad couple of days for riding with an unusual amount of yard work.
                    Yesterday we stopped schooling all together when someone was out in the garden with a machete (sp?). Totally blew her mind, and wasn't worth risking my safety when no one else was around.

                    I agree though that it doesn't look that bad when I went back and watched it. It just felt really bad I guess.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I didn't think it was all that bad

                      All in all, I'd say she'd need more forward and impulsion. Right now she looks a bit too laid back, particularly at the trot. However, she's very cute (though a judge may point out that she's a teeny lil' bit, well, chubby) and she seems to respond well to you.

                      You do look a bit tipped forward at times and your lower leg goes too far back when you do. Is she a bit on the lazy side maybe, and are you using your lower leg a lot?

                      The spook is nothing; that happens at every level. You got her right back under control, that's what counts. Still, if she went a bit more forward, she might actually be less likely to spook.

                      Good luck for your show!

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by NCSue View Post
                        What? No bucking? No jumping around because a horse eating monster is coming after her? NO flipping around with one leg up over her head trying to get a biting fly? LOL! That was my ride today. And believe me that isn't distracted . You've got a precious gem. You will do absolutely fine. Since your mare is used to riding by herself she probably won't be looking for other horses in the ring, but that does bother some right at first.
                        hehe we've done the biting fly buck a couple times. I've got a good arsenal of fly spray and fly repellent lotion now.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by spotted mustang View Post
                          she's very cute (though a judge may point out that she's a teeny lil' bit, well, chubby)
                          She's 3/4 Belgian so she is naturally wide. She's actually in pretty decent weight now. You can feel but not see ribs slightly.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by VTHokie View Post
                            She's 3/4 Belgian so she is naturally wide. She's actually in pretty decent weight now. You can feel but not see ribs slightly.
                            lol Uh oh. I should know better than to comment on a lady's weight. I might have seen it wrong on my tiny lil' screen. If so, please pass on my humble apologies to Ms. Ginger, along with a kiss and a carrot.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Awwww,

                              Cute, cute, cute, not at all what I was expecting based on your description. Sorry, can't criticize you or your very cute horse. Good luck and have fun!!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by VTHokie View Post
                                Hmm..I hadn't thought of what happens before the show starts. Is it usually allowed for riders to go in the arena before it starts? The treat thing could work.....
                                Yes yes yes! You will find lots of people walking their horses around the ring before the show officially starts at recognized and schooling shows. At recognized shows, lots of people school in the ring the day/night before. Sometimes shows open the ring area for hand walking or even riding during lunch or breaks. You may not want to ride but you can certainly hand walk your horse all around the arena before the show starts. I *ALWAYS* show horses the ring area and judges stand prior to a show if at all possible. If the show is out in the open you can sometimes longe behind the judges stand, too. It is really worth taking the time if you can. Your gal looks like she'll appreciate it and really work with you. Like I said, some might cringe, but I never underestimate the power of treats. It has yet to let me down...
                                Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Wondering if I should drop my stirrups back down a hole. Put them up today, because I felt like I was reaching and couldn't keep my heel down at all. The saddle is new to me as of last week (it is a used Rembrant - well broken in). I was riding in an all-purpose Wintec so pretty big change. Re-learning how to post with such a deep seat.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Sometimes a horse will be more likely to spook at something at home that has "changed" than going to someplace where everything is new (hope this makes sense). You will be fine. Good luck.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by Liz View Post
                                      Sometimes a horse will be more likely to spook at something at home that has "changed" than going to someplace where everything is new (hope this makes sense). You will be fine. Good luck.
                                      True!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I watched the intro test and it was very pleasant. Consistent, steady and quiet, just what they want in intro. The spooking a little bit was no big deal, especially for a young horse. When you are approaching something that is scary, think a little shoulder-in feel or shoulder-fore. Even if the mare doesn't actually know how to do that movement, if you put yourself in that mindset, it will really move her off your inside leg which will help keep her from spooking in.

                                        On the intro test, remember that the movement for the halt specifically says to halt through the walk. So make sure you walk before X and then walk for a few clear strides before you halt. Your first halt was very nice, but there were no walk steps so a judge could fault you for that.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X