• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

It must be impossible

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • It must be impossible

    to find an OLD school style warmblood with an ammy-safe personality. I swear, the thicker, chunkier warmblood and/or cross just doesn't exist anymore. Unless you go mainly draft, the pickings are super slim. Grrrr. Anyone know of any farms that are actively breeding for the oldies but goodies?

  • #2
    There are a few of us that are breeding horses with a lot of bone, quiet temperments, and good movement. Unfortunately, the inspection process doesn't support that (those horses don't tend to do as well when inspected) and the buyer market isn't as strong - but don't give up, keep looking, a few of us do like sturdy, quiet, nice moving horses!
    www.MysticOakRanch.com Friesian/Warmblood Crosses, the Ultimate Sporthorse
    Director, WTF Registry

    Comment


    • #3
      You may also want to look at Irish Draughts. That breed has kept the characteristics that you describe. They are often crossed with TBs to create Irish Sport Horses for eventing.
      "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

      Comment


      • #4
        Look at Registered Irish Draught horses. No one thinks of them for dressage, just jumping and such, but some are coming in a sporty package--I've scribed several times lately where the horses walking out with the best scores are very rideable RID geldings and mares, and one of the judges said she was looking for one for herself after seeing some in the dressage ring. Certainly in the eventing scene I know many who are routinely in the 20s after dressage.

        Check out this stallion and one of his sportier sons as an example:
        http://www.blackberryridgefarm.com/s...s/bellman.html
        http://www.blackberryridgefarm.com/stallions/hawk.html

        I crossed Bellman to my appendix QH mare for an eventing prospect, but my 4 yr old filly has the qualities of a nice dressage ride, also. This is a video of her 5th and 8th rides this spring as she started under saddle after her winter off (she had 30 days in September):
        http://www.youtube.com/user/eileengm...11/jBZbrGb5AMM

        Not all are going to be good for straight dressage, as that is not the traditional use, but a significant portion would be competitive and along the lines of the old style Warmbloods. I think of this fellow as more of an eventing type, but he is also very like the Warmbloods that used to be more popular (and this one is also the sire of my 11 week old filly, bred for eventing but I expect she will do nicely for dressage also):
        http://www.dandelionfarm.com/hunting...proud-tim.html

        The more traditional you go, the more like an older style warmblood you will get, although you might start to lose the movement to be competitive at the higher levels. I like Foxglen Himself for an old style heavier horse, although he was too heavy to use for my purposes:
        http://www.bellwetheririshdraughts.com/breeding.htm

        Just a thought for a place you might look for something closer to the old fashioned warm bloods.
        Eileen
        http://themaresnest.us

        Comment


        • #5
          Go for Geezer

          Oh you poor thing! Horse shopping is tough. I have one, a selle-francais, very old type wb--big bodied and so very kind...

          He is, without a doubt, the best thing that has ever happened to me.

          I wish you all the best. Consider the geezers too--many of them get short-changed...they may not be in their prime, but they can be great friends and teachers and still be really competitive. You just have to be a little sensitive with their routine...more turnout time, give them plenty of walk breaks in lessons and maybe a bute after a tough ride. Lots of hack/fun time too! A good Senior Flex supplement. Limit youself to 4 or 5 shows a year...not every weekend.

          Comment


          • #6
            I know of some. Sent you a PM!

            Comment


            • #7
              She has some nice ones
              http://www.highpointfarm.org/forsaledressage.htm

              They don't have theirs on here but they were at our last show and did really well and are nice
              http://www.signature-sporthorses.com/sales.html

              This guy is very nice, big old style and nice mover. Calm and beg safe and easy ride. If I needed another horse right now I'd get him in a heartbeat.
              http://www.highvalleyhanoverians.net/DonnerFeld.htm
              Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                rabicon - the DP gelding is yummy! Wonder what bugged him about his canter depart in his video, but his barrel is exactly what I'm looking for - nice and round and something to just drape over

                I've replied back to those who pM'd me - thanks!

                Will look at the other links that were posted as well.

                I can be quite timid in the beginning until I get to know a horse, so that level headed personality is what I like. I chuckle, but I actually ask owners' if they woudl put their grandma on the horse - if so, then we may have a winner I prefer to push for forward than pray for brakes - I know, it's counterproductive for dressage, but once I get to know them, then I'm good to go

                Eiride - taht ID stallion is GORGEOUS! Love a liver chestnut!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ames View Post
                  to find an OLD school style warmblood with an ammy-safe personality. I swear, the thicker, chunkier warmblood and/or cross just doesn't exist anymore. Unless you go mainly draft, the pickings are super slim. Grrrr. Anyone know of any farms that are actively breeding for the oldies but goodies?
                  Fairview Horse Center has an older style Dutch WB stallion and offspring with good temperaments. She posts here; you can pm her.

                  Also, just an FYI, the chunkier physicality does not necessarily mean the horse is more or less amateur friendly. In fact, one reason breeders started moving towards the lighter, more modern type was to improve rideability. In general, it is harder for petite, frequently female, riders to collect and manage a huge clunker of a horse. It takes a really strong core and a lot of leg to do so. Regardless, if you want a bigger chunkier horse, they are out there, too.

                  And, fwiw, I do think some breeders are moving towards a standard that is too light - but not because I think it is less amateur friendly. I breed primarily for the upper levels and need the horse to have a good engine, power, and sufficient bone to handle the kind of muscle development that level requires. So I like some of the older style attrributes for those reasons. But I can virtually guarantee that a lighter horse will be easier to ride.
                  Roseknoll Sporthorses
                  www.roseknoll.net

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have one!!!

                    I am lucky enough to have found an old style WB. Her idea of spooking is stopping to look at the offending item. I bought Roo at 4 months and she has always been super sane. Strangely, her dam is a Thoroughbred and her sire, Candidus, Is by Cor de La Bryere and out of a Landgraf mare, so there is a lot of blood on the sire's side as well. Roo has huge bone and wears a size 87 Rambo. She just turned 4 and I am taking it very slow with her because she is so big and rather physically immature. I am handicapped and Roo seems to realize this. She never takes advantage of me and is easy to handle.

                    I have ridden lots of horses by Candidus and they all seem to have excellent, willing temperaments. Most have not been as large as my mare, although Candidus does tend to add size. There are a couple of Candidus horses for sale at www.gayleestables.com and there is one at www.cressbrookstables.com Mine could be Candidus' twin. The others are not quite as stamped as Roo. They all appear to be rather old style WBs. I know GayLee's horses are definitely ammy safe!

                    When I was in remission, I rode quite a few big, old style WBs and WB crosses. They were IDIOTS. They looked sweet and harmless, but they were unpredictable and spooky. I'm sure there are some nice big ones out there for you

                    Good luck
                    Beth

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      hee hee - I don't mind slow, or having to push - I have arthritis in both hips and knees and most thin skinned/sensitive horses hate me - I can't get my leg OFF the horse (which is why I tend to avoid TB's - love them, but I aggravate them ).

                      My horse that I just lost was an oldenburg/quarter horse cross - GREAT combo!

                      the other reason I like the broader backed/thicker horse, is that it gives me something to sit around. My center o fgraivty is quite high and unless I'm sitting deeply aruond something I have a hard time balancing

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Those 'heavy old fashioned' warmbloods aren't hard to get moving at all - people just don't ride them correctly, they don't separate their aids and don't use their legs. I think the question with that sort, is more whether the rider can handle the amount of motion they have. They tend to have a lot of bounce and a lot of power behind and the good ones tend to require a rider who has a good back.

                        Those horses were bred to be very forward and active - that they get ruined by incorrect riding, is nottheir fault and doesn't make them a bad choice - IF one rides them properly they are an incredible amount of fun, have a lot of power. It is an awful lotta fun to ride a horse that isn't fearful and nervous, like some of the old style warmbloods. But if you try to ride them in an inappropriate way, yes, problems will arise.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          nicely put rodawn the arthritis isn't debilitating, and the more I ride, the better i feel (which is nice!). The horse I lost could be a total pig when it came to going forward - and I agree, having to push push push was not fun. But once we understood each other, his forward was quite nice. He was also round enough that I had balance. I have widely set apart seat bones - find most narrow twists and even some m/n twists very uncomfortable. sitting on the "couch" is easier for me to ride than sitting on something narrow - if it's narrow, I'm constantly pullingmy hips in to stabilize myself, which makes the arthritis act up - not sure if I'm describing it correctly.

                          I do agree that perosnlaity and temperment are my key factors - and breed isn't huge with me (as in bloodlines etc) - but the old style wb "look" and appearance is what I need - does that make sense or is it too late at night and I'm speaking gibberish? Very real possibility

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by slc2 View Post
                            Those 'heavy old fashioned' warmbloods aren't hard to get moving at all - people just don't ride them correctly, they don't separate their aids and don't use their legs. I think the question with that sort, is more whether the rider can handle the amount of motion they have. They tend to have a lot of bounce and a lot of power behind and the good ones tend to require a rider who has a good back.

                            Those horses were bred to be very forward and active - that they get ruined by incorrect riding, is nottheir fault and doesn't make them a bad choice - IF one rides them properly they are an incredible amount of fun, have a lot of power. It is an awful lotta fun to ride a horse that isn't fearful and nervous, like some of the old style warmbloods. But if you try to ride them in an inappropriate way, yes, problems will arise.
                            I agree with this. I don't equate the older style ones with laziness or think they are generally hard to get moving, though I am sure one can find examples of that.
                            Roseknoll Sporthorses
                            www.roseknoll.net

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              okay - I know nothing of this horse, but his picture is representative of the "type" of horse as far as body goes, that I'm looking for:

                              http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse...4&share_this=Y

                              deep, WIDE heart girth, and rounded barrel. Legs look thikc enough to support his body mass, good neck that goes with the rest of him.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                I will travel - tell me more!!!!! And yes, you nailed everything right on the money - did you know my old horse???

                                I grew up in Ontario - haven't been up north in a few years

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  well, you never know - the farthest I've gone is 9 hours though. is it odd to say I also like them 16.2 and under if possible? I'm so picky

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    well feel free to send prospects my way - you never know unless you try!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I don't have anything for sale right now, but I must tell you my broodmares have the temperment you are looking for. If you let them graze without a muzzle they'll have that round body you look for was well. :>) A couple of my mares actually let the big flies drill them and don't move! They have been tested, awarded the ELITE Hanoverian mare title, have high rideability and are excellent dressage candidates. If you want to buy good quality, obtain the traits you seek and have the opportunity to bond with your next horse until ready to ride, watch for our upcoming foals in 2010. I always sell the colts!
                                      HiddenAcresFarm.Net
                                      Imported from Germany, Assembled in Michigan
                                      Rare damline of 7 direct generations of Elite/States Premium Mares.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        hiddenacres - when are your mares going to deliver?

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X