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Speaking of Quarter Horses, Poco bloodlines?

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  • Speaking of Quarter Horses, Poco bloodlines?

    When I was in High School quite a few years ago, my first dressage horse was a wonderful 14.2h quarter horse, bred in Michigan. He was of the "Poco" bloodlines. He was a lighter type, not very muscle bound, and just wonderful to train.

    I have a friend looking for a similar type of "hony" for dressage. Does anyone know if these bloodlines are still being used and where we might find such a horse?

  • #2
    Poco Bueno was an old very accomplished cowhorse stallion, his gaits were not the best and he tended to pass them on, short and choppy, if very athletic anyway.

    I think that the horse you remember must have received his good gaits from some other in his breeding.

    This was a good looking granddaughter of Poco Bueno thru Poco Dell that had lovely gaits, but she didn't get them from the postlegged, short and squatty Poco Buenos:

    http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...g?t=1250017120

    Here is a grandson of Poco Bueno that looks like him, the old type, bulldog quarter horse.
    He also was the roughest trotting horse you ever tried to sit on, like a short, rapid cilinder hitting hard:

    http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...g?t=1250017283

    Both of these horses were very good ranch horses and had many of the good Poco Bueno features they were known for.
    Last edited by Bluey; Aug. 11, 2009, 03:04 PM.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      you are right, now that I "googled" Poco. Poco Bueno looked nothing like my horse. Sorry for the post, I knew nothing about "foundation" breeding. I was really lucky with my little horse, when I went to college, he stayed on as a "schoolmaster" at the lower levels, with Violet Hopkins and her students to teach on.

      So does anyone know a lighter type, smaller QH or cross for sale, suitable for dressage, safe, need not be a world beater.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you're interested in those older, more "Baroque"-style QH bloodlines, you might look for a Hancock-bred horse. Here's a link where you can learn more about them.

        http://www.hancockhorses.com/articles.html

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by LJStarkey View Post
          If you're interested in those older, more "Baroque"-style QH bloodlines, you might look for a Hancock-bred horse. Here's a link where you can learn more about them.

          http://www.hancockhorses.com/articles.html

          No, want a smaller, lighter horse. I did not realize that my little horse was not typical of the line.

          Comment


          • #6
            Quarter horses are known as "the versatile" breed.
            That means there are all types of them and you get to pick what type you like to ride for what you want to do.

            I would look for the other qualities you want in a horse more than for specific bloodlines.

            You want small?
            Most cutting, reining and working cowhorse lines tend to be small, ranch horse and roping lines taller.
            I would just look for the type horse you need regardless of the lines, since you are not going to compete in breed shows or need one bred for a certain discipline.

            Comment


            • #7
              Growing up my younger sister had a horse from the Poco line. I do not know how he would have done in dressage, but he has awesome. We rode western and that little horse would try his heart out for his rider. Everyone else who has had horses from that line always made similar comments.
              Jacobson's Saddlery, LLC
              www.thesaddlefits.com
              Society of Master Saddlers trained saddle fitter

              Comment


              • #8
                If you want a smaller quarter horse with nice gaits, look at the pleasure bloodlines or even better some good Western Riding horses (aka lead changing machines). All-arounders will likely be too tall. Some considerations; Zippo Pine Bar, Blazing Hot, Rugged Lark, etc. but now I'm dating myself.

                Know in advance however, that quarter horses typically have a very low neck set and most will travel either downhill (bad) or if nicely put together and properly trained will go level. Very few will travel uphill. This isn't the desired conformation for dressage so some expectations management is in order.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm not up on all of the modern bloodlines but from current/past experience:

                  Look for Boston Mac bloodlines if you want small and good mover and a great mind.

                  Investment Asset throws very sweet babies (not the brightest bulbs on the tree) and because they are Western show bred, they are usually on the small side and very light.

                  Big and good mover is easier because they usually have a lot of TB blood.
                  Bett Ohio (a TB but throws great minds)
                  Skys Blue Boy (don't know about disposition)
                  Ruggard Lark (great minds)

                  Sonny Go Lucky/Sonny Dee Bar horses are very athletic but a little stubborn.

                  Impressive bloodlines tend to like to rear and often have that HYPP problem.

                  Good luck. I love my QH (Irresistible Bett x Hemps Speedy Girl)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    All of the Rugged Lark horses I've known have been very athletic and good movers - but then you have to factor in the rest of the bloodlines. I had a really awesome mare who would have been good for dressage - she was a really good working cow horse, too, but she was so balanced and light. She could go all day and was very uphill and a beautiful overstriding mover. She has also stayed sound o' these many years - she's still toting beginners around the barrel circuit and I see her from time to time (she's in her mid-20's now, but I broke and trained her and had her till she was 9). She has a great forever home and I'm very proud of the part I played in her upbringing. She was Rugged Lark on the topside but Go Dick Go (a Florida bred racing QH) on the mare line.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mickeydoodle View Post
                      No, want a smaller, lighter horse. I did not realize that my little horse was not typical of the line.
                      I think I know what you mean - our old foundation-bred QH stallion was "hony-sized" maybe 15.1 & because he was NOT the modern muscle-bound type, folks often wondered if he were maybe a Morgan or an Arab cross . . . but he didn't look like that, either.

                      He stayed with a friend who was a dressage trainer & the first time she saw him, she shook her head and said, "I think he's the most correct mover I've ever seen!"

                      Last year we sold one of his sons - a TB cross, who is bigger (maybe 15.3) than his sire. His new owner was working with him when a friend who is a confirmed warmblood-owning dressage rider showed up, took one look & said simply, "I'm jealous."

                      (And we've got 2 of them left at home.)

                      As a plus, they all work cattle & the ones we've trail ridden have been pretty happy doing it, if you want to get out of the dressage ring and "play" somewhere else.

                      By the way, the stallion's sire was from the Virginia/Tennessee area (we're not - we're farther north) & named "King's Destiny." If you by chance see the name in a pedigree, well, it's a place to start. (The stallion's dam was a Waggoner ranch mare by a cutting stallion named War Leo, if you are looking at pedigrees).

                      Edited to add pictures:





                      Hidden Echo Farm, Carlisle, PA -- home of JC palomino sire Canadian Kid (1990 - 2013) & AQHA sire Lark's Favorite, son of Rugged Lark.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by QHDQ View Post
                        I'm not up on all of the modern bloodlines but from current/past experience:

                        Look for Boston Mac bloodlines if you want small and good mover and a great mind.

                        Investment Asset throws very sweet babies (not the brightest bulbs on the tree) and because they are Western show bred, they are usually on the small side and very light.

                        Big and good mover is easier because they usually have a lot of TB blood.
                        Bett Ohio (a TB but throws great minds)
                        Skys Blue Boy (don't know about disposition)
                        Ruggard Lark (great minds)

                        Sonny Go Lucky/Sonny Dee Bar horses are very athletic but a little stubborn.

                        Impressive bloodlines tend to like to rear and often have that HYPP problem.

                        Good luck. I love my QH (Irresistible Bett x Hemps Speedy Girl)
                        Some of that I agree with, except with Boston Mac, according to the several that have come thru our hands and what we have heard over the years.
                        Horses that his breeding comes thru generally tend to be hard to keep sound, are more the nervous kind and have tendency to have skin allergies.

                        Even with all that, some are very good performers and people will put up with any drawbacks to them because of that.

                        We used to train some Go Dick Go sons and they were very good as race and ranch horses.
                        Maybe not top race horses, but they sure would consistently bring a check home if you entered them in the right races for them.
                        We trained, raced and kept one of his sons as a stallion for several years, but the bloodlines were not that popular, so we finally gelded him at ten.
                        Since he was a good ranch horse also, he adjusted well to being a gelding.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I too would look at the horse, not the blood lines. If you get bogged down in blood lines, you may miss the very horse you want.

                          I remember riding a lovely mare by Forecast many years ago. Don't even remember her dam.
                          Unfortunately he didn't seem to imprint his foals, and a lot of them followed their dams.

                          BTW I would not use the word "baroque" in conjunction with Poco Bueno.
                          Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                          Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            QH are great in my book. My own is of racing bloodlines..which means is very heavy TB on sire side.

                            http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/shades+of+black+gold

                            Everyone always asked what his breeding is. He would have made a very nice English styled mount.

                            We had Poco Imprint as a child....very bulldoggish! He would sit..and when he did he looked like an elephant!
                            "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mickeydoodle View Post
                              When I was in High School quite a few years ago, my first dressage horse was a wonderful 14.2h quarter horse, bred in Michigan. He was of the "Poco" bloodlines. He was a lighter type, not very muscle bound, and just wonderful to train.

                              I have a friend looking for a similar type of "hony" for dressage. Does anyone know if these bloodlines are still being used and where we might find such a horse?
                              Lisa, you might want to take a look at the reining horses. They tend to run towards "hony" range, use some Poco lines and come with a number of pre-installed stuff. I remember when I slapped a dressage saddle on one and did an entire 4-1 with him, including tempi's. Probably not the cleanest half pass in the world, but he tried his heart out and the breaks where still definitely there.
                              Kelly
                              It is rare to see a rider who is truly passionate about the horse and his training, taking a profound interest in dressage with self-abnegation, and making this extraordinarily subtle work one of the dominant motivations of his life.\"

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by atlatl View Post
                                If you want a smaller quarter horse with nice gaits, look at the pleasure bloodlines or even better some good Western Riding horses (aka lead changing machines). All-arounders will likely be too tall. Some considerations; Zippo Pine Bar, Blazing Hot, Rugged Lark, etc. but now I'm dating myself.

                                Know in advance however, that quarter horses typically have a very low neck set and most will travel either downhill (bad) or if nicely put together and properly trained will go level. Very few will travel uphill. This isn't the desired conformation for dressage so some expectations management is in order.
                                My little dressage QH is a son of Blazing Hot and he is absolutely adorable.
                                He is a cute little mover too.

                                He has turned me into a great big fan of the QH breed so I 100% second atlatl's recommendation!
                                The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                                Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                                Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                                The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  hi

                                  i have a little quarter horse fellow for a dressage mount. he and my off the track tb just helped me achieve my usdf rider's performance award at training level : ) i think if you look to the more tb influenced lines in a qh you will be happy. my little boy is a grandson on the sire side of the great three bars, a racing tb, and mare line bred to impressive. he is not hypp and does not have any rearing issues. impressive was quite a bit tb. my boy is about 15.3 and very solidly built yet refined. perhaps check out the aqha website to see if their are any breeders in your area that have qh for sale that suit your friends needs.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Wow Meupatdoes

                                    You should be proud, he is beautiful.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      This Thread Takes Me Back

                                      This thread takes me back - way back.

                                      We were all in awe of Poco Bueno and his cow sense. We got a Poco Bueno grandson, and he did not have a bone jarring gait. We loved those bloodlines. I can remember drooling over the mare, Poco Lena, who was some kind of cutting horse! She produced, too. I remember I sobbed when they had to put her down.

                                      Now we hear that HERDA is supposed to come down from the sire line of Poco Bueno. I guess we didn't know any better back then.

                                      And also way back were the King Ranch Quarter Horses. Mr. Kleberg was keen on genetics and great record keeping. I was so pleased to have a couple of Hired Hand bred geldings that I showed. Talk about easy moving horses! Hired Hand was a prepotent son of Old Sorrel who was at the foundation of the King Ranch breeding program. Hired Hand was used to "set type" and was closely line bred to some Old Sorrel progeny. Mr. Kleberg was closely observant in his line breeding and did not want the mares he produced to have masculine characteristics. When that happened he brought in mares to outcross. I had a lot of respect for Mr. Kleberg.

                                      Thanks for taking me back to the olden days...

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I used to work for Deseret Ranches, and we had some of those King ranch mares - my mare was out of their stock. Lots of Poco Bueno, but we never had a HERDA horse, thank goodness. I was heavy into breeding and training stock horses through their program (they had an employee incentive program where you would take 2 year olds and break them, and if you trained them for 6 months they were yours to resell) and we had some really good horses come out of there. Not your heavy pleasure type QH that you see today, but light, responsive horses that had a lot of sense. That's where my mare came from - as a 2 year old she'd never been handled but she was very easy to work with and sensible.

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