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Olympic Ferro Off spring?

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  • Olympic Ferro Off spring?

    Hi all, Has anyone worked with his offspring? I am wanting to know about there temperament are they spooky. Are they easy to handle. I am looking at a mare by him and I know nothing about him. Any help would be super.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dussel View Post
    Hi all, Has anyone worked with his offspring? I am wanting to know about there temperament are they spooky. Are they easy to handle. I am looking at a mare by him and I know nothing about him. Any help would be super.
    Why don't you ask Horsedances (Theo) he knows everything about this horse.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have known several (maybe 6 or more). They were all beautiful and sensitive, one heard voices in his head

      But every horse has a mother.
      See those flying monkeys? They work for me.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have worked with a few - they are very talented nice horses as a whole... I think they can seem a little sensitive but I find that sensitivity to be wonderful once you have an understanding of how to use it. I would never hesitate to add a Ferro to our herd. We have a filly from this year and I wish we could keep her. We will be breeding her dam back to Ferro in a couple years.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've got a stallion by Ferro. He was sensitive as a youngster, but everyone who has worked with him comments on his great work ethic and everyone who has ridden him loves him. He always gives 110%.

          His full sister was a terrific horse as well. Sensitive as a youngster and a dream undersaddle.

          I've had a few of my guy's offspring on the farm, as well as a filly by Ferro and found them all to be smart, definitely not spooky, GORGEOUS, and great movers. If you treat them fairly and with respect, they are incredible. I would breed the right mare to Ferro in a heartbeat

          Comment


          • #6
            Agreed 100% with Rising Star.

            You MUST treat them with respect. Having worked with a few Arabs over the years, I have found the Ferros to have that type of a temperament. If they suspect that you are pushing too hard or picking a fight (in their perception), they could be rather dangerous (flakey and explosive).

            However, mine is one of the most lovely horses I've ever sat upon. He is a dream to work with. Amazing work ethic and sweet as he can be. He gives me "horsey hugs" and follows me all over the place. He is out of a TB Secretariat line mare.

            I have this one and a friend has another that I have also ridden and watched her bring along. She has done very nicely and that is a really talented one, too. With the wrong person bringing them along, however, they could be absolute basket cases.

            I refer to mine as the "Woody Allen" of my herd. He has acutely sharp senses, overanalyzes EVERYTHING (he is EXTREMELY intelligent), and, before my CALM (more N.H. type) interactions with him, he reacted FIRST, and thought about things SECOND.

            He is so smart and willing (what LOVELY willingness), he is now learning to THINK and REACT, at least at the same time (bolting is pretty much gone - he now spooks, at times, but it is a mild spook as with any greenie).

            I have to say, most people wouldn't be able to handle this horse (I sent him to one Pro dressage trainer, who had him 3 mos. total and had only progressed to having her working student on him on a LEAD LINE by the end of 90 days. This was after I had started him on LONG LINE first w/saddle, bridle, etc.).

            I brought him home, but as an Ammy, I was still a bit too intimidated to try saddle breaking alone, tho. I then sent him to a cowboy, who, with a CALM, EASY hand, was cantering U/S within 10 days - but more important, doing so with a 100% relaxed horse - swinging back, head down, going in to low roofed wash room for baths, etc. ... all this in 10 days, even tho no one had ever ridden the horse off a lead line! My questions about this horse were answered -- that his performance depends entirely on the handler/rider and he really wasn't dangerous, flakey OR mean. Cowboy and I had a wonderful conversation about this because we were both so utterly pleased with the horse's total relaxation and how much the horse OFFERED to him in such a short time frame ... so I brought the horse home after only 15 days. As of current, he is with me doing beautifully in his basic work U/S.

            So, with the right PEOPLE by their side, they can come along phenomenally fast. They are loyal, like puppy dogs. If you become their friend, you will have a dedicated partner by your side for LIFE! They are extremely athletic and capable. They will become very calm with the right handling. In fact, I am finding that I am now having to "push" and "remind" my horse to be forward and alert these days. ... he is so relaxed U/S now ...

            But, you can't be unfair. You can't pick a fight. You can't DEMAND that they do anything. If they decided you pass muster, they will offer you the WORLD.

            Above all else, one must remember that with the Ferro's, you must correct fairly and calmly, then MOVE ON .

            BTW - There are photos on my website -- Ferro throws just GORGEOUS, finely chiseled and expressive heads.

            Magnum
            "If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up somewhere else."

            Comment


            • #7
              I rode a third level Ferro mare in Holland - felt like I was sitting on dynamite - like she was ready to explode. Since an ammy had ridden her in Holland I felt at least part of her temperment was the fact that the (new to her) barn she was in had no turnout other than about 15 minutes in the indorr arena or on the hot walker.

              My trainer also had a Ferro gelding who was 15th in the nation his first year at GP. She HATED doing the lower levels on him but he blossumed once he got to the higher levels. He had a funky problem (evvery once in a while) with girthing where he would explode - she heard (after she bought him and experienced the problem) that doing that is a characteristic in some of the Ferro's - perhaps they'll very sensitive in that area? Anyway it didn't matter how slowly she cinched the girth - it happened no matter how fast (if it happened at all).
              Now in Kentucky

              Comment


              • #8
                A friend of mine has a gelding by Ferro. A nicer, more accomodating horse there never was. He has a terrific temperment, and a great attitude. She won a regional championship their first year together, when both the horse and rider were 13. He is a wonderful horse.

                Comment


                • #9
                  As a breeder of Dutch horses, having bred to Ferro and knowing several other folks that have done the same, I am always amazed when whatever character flaw there is in a horse is attributed to the stallion. After many years I have come to the conclusion that it's due to the fact that most people don't know what the mare line is or what it stands for... ergo, let's blame all the problems OR give all the praise to the stallion whose name is usually known.

                  Just my opinion....
                  Siegi Belz
                  www.stalleuropa.com
                  2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
                  Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's also possible that the 3rd level mare in Holland 'ready to explode' was just very typically trained, where they are supposed to be that sensitive to the aids. I tried some horses that were absolutely electric - they were trained to be electric.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We have a Ferro/Arab cross in our barn. He's a Ferrari--very lovely and very talented, very hot and very sensitive. (He's also a total hothouse flower city boy. No great outdoors/turnout/trail stuff for him!)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by siegi b. View Post
                        As a breeder of Dutch horses, having bred to Ferro and knowing several other folks that have done the same, I am always amazed when whatever character flaw there is in a horse is attributed to the stallion. After many years I have come to the conclusion that it's due to the fact that most people don't know what the mare line is or what it stands for... ergo, let's blame all the problems OR give all the praise to the stallion whose name is usually known.

                        Just my opinion....
                        Hi Seigi --

                        In the case of my Ferro's mare, I have another gelding out of the same mare. That one is by Routinier (who is known to be quiet and laid back). The Routinier baby is quiet as a mouse, and has never spooked ONCE, even as a greenie. Not on trails, at shows with flags a-waving, etc.

                        A friend bought another horse out of the same mare, by a hotter Stallion. That horse is "hot," just like the stallion.

                        Then there is my "hot/ sensitive" Ferro out of this same mare.

                        So, the mare (who is VERY VERY quiet and laid back) in this scenario seems to throw a very close image of the stallion. Ergo, the sensitivity (which I so value) in my Ferro appears to have come more from Ferro (even down to his coloring).

                        Magnum
                        "If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up somewhere else."

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Siegi,
                          I totally agree with your statement. I know the mare line but I did not know much about the stallion line. That is why I asked the q about the stallion. Thanks everyone for the great info. She is a lovely mare very willing and off the leg. She has the natural ability to collect all gates. She is sensitive but not crazy. Still trying to make up my mind on her. I have all ways like geldings better. So that is the big deal right now Mare or Gelding?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Interesting that I saw this thread. I just met a breeder from Holland who came to tour our farm the other day, she has met Ferro in person. We were talking bloodlines, breeding and such and she specifically brought him up as a horse with great talent but a questionable personality. She indicated that while she felt he had immense talent, which was passed along to offspring, she wouldn't breed anything to him for personality alone. She felt the Ferro's were very sensitive and hard to deal with on the ground. I've met a few myself, and I can see the sensitivity comment but never found any of them difficult on the ground. I agree with Seigi on the mare line comment, that needs to be taken into consideration at all times. I'm simply passing along what I was told by someone who seems to be fairly well qualified to respond, having met the horse herself.
                            Proud Momma:

                            Imax - Fresstyle x Juventus x Rubinstein
                            2014 - Sister to IMAX (hopefully)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dussel View Post
                              Siegi,
                              I totally agree with your statement. I know the mare line but I did not know much about the stallion line. That is why I asked the q about the stallion. Thanks everyone for the great info. She is a lovely mare very willing and off the leg. She has the natural ability to collect all gates. She is sensitive but not crazy. Still trying to make up my mind on her. I have all ways like geldings better. So that is the big deal right now Mare or Gelding?
                              I love Ferros.

                              Re mare or gelding - I think some people are mare people, and some are not. I happen to love a good mare; I find they can be incredibly loyal and will try their hearts out for you.
                              Roseknoll Sporthorses
                              www.roseknoll.net

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Kristina Harrison won a gold medal at the Pan Am Games on a Ferro gelding, Kantor. Someone else owns him now, but I think he's still in her barn.
                                2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                                A helmet saved my life.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I have a filly by Rousseau who is by Ferro. She absolutely could not have a better temperament, and from what I hear, her daddy is the same. Great character in these horses! I am so so in love with mine - she has about 60 days under saddle now as a three year old and I can trail ride her all over the place alone or in company and do a decent training level test. All that came pretty much without feeling like I was doing any training - born broke. I am an amateur, too.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Oh, it depends! Stallions *and* mares pass on their traits and some are stronger than others...and some are stronger than others within specific lines. Ferro offspring are frequently (not *always*) characterized as hot and sensitive. Because alot of them are. I know someone who is a working student with an Olympic rider who owns/rides a Ferro offspring. This rider stands several studs out of that offspring because they are very talented. The person I know owns an offspring. SHE characterizes many of the Ferro offspring as sensitive and of (and I quote) "tricky" character. Talented, but "tricky" character and not always easy and in her mind is characteristic of the line. Obviously, every horse is an individual but stallions do occasionally "stamp" foals. So do mares.
                                    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I know a Ferro gelding. He was bred by a friend of mine and has always been sensitive/hot. That being said he is exceptionally talented and just a fun horse. But he does take exception to anything he thinks is unfair. I have ridden him myself a few times and loved him but I know he wouldn't take kindly to anything less than the most tactful of aids.
                                      glimmerling


                                      Member Appaloosa lovers clique

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Can anyone speak to the horse's unmounted "issues"? Wondering if it is common for them to have ulcers, bad teeth, prone to skin problems, etc.

                                        Everyone spoke about mounted and I always wish that someone would bring up whether or not offspring are prone to lameness, rearing issues, etc.
                                        www.mooredressage.com
                                        www.alsikkanfarm.com

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