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Video Critque

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  • Video Critque

    I finally got the videos up from three shows ago, I thought I would post them and see what you guys make of them. It was my second dressage show ever and my last time showing Intro before moving up to training level. My horse is trained to I-1, but he is perfectly content to live the easy life working the lower levels. I am hoping to show him in first level and Para FEI Grade III next year.

    Sat. Intro A
    Sat. Intro B
    Sun. Intro A
    Sun. Intro B
    Ellie and Werther Blog

  • #2
    I'll let the experts comment, but wanted to say that you two look like a great match! Love your horse. Tell us about him...what's his breed, training, etc.?

    Comment


    • #3
      I would really like to see you doing a bit more work on the lunge... working on your consistency with your seat and strengthening your core and ability to hold your hands quiet. It may help, as well, to sit back a bit further and bend your elbows so you're not pushing your hands down.

      I'm sure your horse is more than happy to do what you guys are doing! I do hope he makes a nice school master for you.
      http://dressageesquire.blogspot.com
      "The ability to write a check for attire should not be confused with expertise. Proficiency doesn't arrive shrink-wrapped from UPS and placed on your doorstep."

      Comment


      • #4
        Love your horse! He(she?) looks very relaxed. Very nice partnership!

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by Austin Rider View Post
          I'll let the experts comment, but wanted to say that you two look like a great match! Love your horse. Tell us about him...what's his breed, training, etc.?
          He is a 16 year old Hanoverian by Werther out of a Rigoletto (Westphalian) mare. He is imported from Germany as an eight year old. My trainer said the did 90% good work on him, but someone got greedy and messed up his collected walk. When he was imported to Canada, he was a 3'6 equitation medal horse and children's jumper until I bought him last year. I've only been doing dressage on him for about 6 months.

          Originally posted by Quest52 View Post
          I would really like to see you doing a bit more work on the lunge... working on your consistency with your seat and strengthening your core and ability to hold your hands quiet. It may help, as well, to sit back a bit further and bend your elbows so you're not pushing your hands down.

          I'm sure your horse is more than happy to do what you guys are doing! I do hope he makes a nice school master for you.
          I would like to get on the lunge more too, unfortunately I often ride alone at my farm after work so I don't have anyone to do it will I'm hacking. My trainer has plans to do a lot of lunge work with me when our show season is over.

          Originally posted by MargaretW View Post
          Love your horse! He(she?) looks very relaxed. Very nice partnership!
          Thanks!
          Ellie and Werther Blog

          Comment


          • #6
            Nice horse with so much potential in both of you. I'd say to really sit up. You lean to forward and turn your thumbs up. He looks like he has a big trot because he really pushes you up and you really loose your seat. Do so work at home to strengthen your core and leg to better help you post his trot. He is beautiful, the only thing I see (and someone correct me if I'm wrong) in intro you need to push his walk a little more. He's not really reaching in the walk. He is beautiful and good luck
            Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole

            Comment


            • #7
              What a lovely horse, and it's obvious you have a fantastic partnership! Good for you for getting out and doing the able-bodied classes as well as planning to do para-dressage! Do as much as you can to work on your strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination, both on and off of the horse. I am a bit challenged myself in those areas, although I'm not disabled except for my hearing loss. Longe lessons should be helpful, and you can do a lot of exercises on a long rein at the walk and trot, since he is tolerant. I have a few links to descriptions of them, if you'd like me to pass them on.
              Stay me with coffee, comfort me with chocolate, for I am sick of love.

              Comment


              • #8
                Since you mentioned you might ride in FEI III Para division, I'm assuming you have a disability? Does it make it difficult for you to sit up straight, or put your heels down? Those are the two things I see that need work, and I can't tell if those things are approachable or not. If those are things that you can work on those are the two things I notice. It appears you collapse in the left hip - again, if that's something you can work on.

                What I LOVED about this test was the very obvious partnership of horse and rider. The horse was very attentive and listening to you, and you and he seem to know each other well. The horse was extremely obedient and pleasant. It's such a pleasure to watch the two of you.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by rabicon View Post
                  Nice horse with so much potential in both of you. I'd say to really sit up. You lean to forward and turn your thumbs up. He looks like he has a big trot because he really pushes you up and you really loose your seat. Do so work at home to strengthen your core and leg to better help you post his trot. He is beautiful, the only thing I see (and someone correct me if I'm wrong) in intro you need to push his walk a little more. He's not really reaching in the walk. He is beautiful and good luck
                  I was a hunter rider up until 6 or so months ago, I'm still working on undoing a lot of my hunter position. I'm constantly working on his walk. Whoever trained him in Germany did about 90% good work on him and then got too ambitious with collected walk and now he is very laterally tight. My trainer thinks it might be fixable, I've been doing a lot of stretching exercises with him and working on his impulsion at the walk.

                  Originally posted by Whisper View Post
                  What a lovely horse, and it's obvious you have a fantastic partnership! Good for you for getting out and doing the able-bodied classes as well as planning to do para-dressage! Do as much as you can to work on your strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination, both on and off of the horse. I am a bit challenged myself in those areas, although I'm not disabled except for my hearing loss. Longe lessons should be helpful, and you can do a lot of exercises on a long rein at the walk and trot, since he is tolerant. I have a few links to descriptions of them, if you'd like me to pass them on.
                  I would love to see them, post here or send me PM.

                  Originally posted by slc2 View Post
                  Since you mentioned you might ride in FEI III Para division, I'm assuming you have a disability? Does it make it difficult for you to sit up straight, or put your heels down? Those are the two things I see that need work, and I can't tell if those things are approachable or not. If those are things that you can work on those are the two things I notice. It appears you collapse in the left hip - again, if that's something you can work on.

                  What I LOVED about this test was the very obvious partnership of horse and rider. The horse was very attentive and listening to you, and you and he seem to know each other well. The horse was extremely obedient and pleasant. It's such a pleasure to watch the two of you.
                  I have Cerebral Palsy which effects my left side, primarily. My left leg is very tight, the most stretch I can get in that heel is flat. I also have some lesser problems with my left hand, if I don't concentrate on keeping it down stretched out, it can curl up.
                  Ellie and Werther Blog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Quest52 View Post
                    I would really like to see you doing a bit more work on the lunge... working on your consistency with your seat and strengthening your core and ability to hold your hands quiet. It may help, as well, to sit back a bit further and bend your elbows so you're not pushing your hands down.

                    I'm sure your horse is more than happy to do what you guys are doing! I do hope he makes a nice school master for you.
                    tend to agree but as you have a disability might be harder for you as your missing the beat of the trot a tad
                    try thinking music 1 2 3 4 beats is walk 1 2 beats trot and 1 2 3 is canter

                    try when riding at home getting the rythem in your head in time with his feet
                    as your missing the beat of the horse so are troting with extra little bounces
                    make sure your stirrups are at the correct lenght as this wil help your position which in turn will help in
                    your riding
                    look here in how to http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum...d.php?t=178116
                    also read all of page one especially 1st page all links as it all relevant

                    as becuase your a little off you tend to support yourself in the horses head
                    and jingle jangle on the bit which is confusing the horse as he not got a direct signal
                    as hes confused he unwilling to go forwards hence why you do big kicks to get him going
                    at times but the horse is an honest sort of which are hard to come by
                    as he accepts how you are with out being naughty




                    dont use the schooling whip excessively as its in the wrong place as you can see by your video you not hitting the horse of which you shouldnt be when using the schooling whip its a tickle
                    as you can see via the video you miss the horse and the hit the air way above his flanks
                    any other horse by doing that kinda thing whould have spooked or shot forwards
                    like i said the horse is quiet and honest and didnt even turn a hair - ideal for you with your disability
                    as hes of a calm nature and takes it all in his stride hes an honest horse as he trys to understand
                    whats been asked of him


                    lay it across your thigh so the end is on his flanks and hold the handle in your hand with thumbs ontop of reins -keeping your thumbs closed is whip on open your thumb whip is off the horse -- its a tickle of the schooling whip on his flanks thats why theres a string attachement at the end of the schooling whip and not a fob

                    as you close the thumbs you squeeze with your legs to encourage the horse forwards it not a kick but a squeeze of both legs keeping
                    personnally i wouldnt be letting you use any whip until your balanced better as even as holding an extra thing in your hands has and does put more pressure on you and your horse as it all to much
                    to do and fuss with

                    when people ride for exsample sometimes they grip for dear life gripping is asking the horse to go forwards so bearing this in mind -- its a squeeze and then release the squeeze then keep the lower leg still once asked

                    you need work on a tad of co ordination of seat leg and hands

                    in time you will be a great pair as this horse is as honest as they come and isnt easily upset by
                    confused signals
                    Last edited by goeslikestink; Jul. 25, 2009, 01:54 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I notice your left arm comes back behind your right much of the time- I'm guessing that also has to do with your disability. I was wondering whether you could get a longer grab strap to loop a finger through and keep them symmetrical? Just a thought, might not be feasable.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It would be worth your time trouble and money to invest in some REALLY GOOD seat lessons NOW. It will make your life a lot more enjoyable. If necessary go away to a trainer for a couple of weeks - but get 'er dun ! Don't let them blow hot air up your skirt either - it's hard boring work, but worth doing so that you don't develop bad habits.
                        This is what you are aiming for http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWh-lM1opkE and there is no reason why you can't achieve it ! Get your seat right now and you're half way there and you'll have a better "dressage seat" than most able bodied riders !!
                        Last edited by Equibrit; Jul. 25, 2009, 12:54 PM.
                        ... _. ._ .._. .._

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had the hunter seat for a while after switching. I feel your pain. It will come, just think about sitting back. I will feel really weird but sit so you think your leaning wayyyy back in the saddle and more than likely you'll be correct. I still revert to the hunter ways in the canter sometimes. Its a hard habit to break after so many years of riding more forward.
                          Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Just like everyone else, I LOVE YOUR HORSE! You have a wonderful partner and teacher in this guy.

                            I also ride with a disability and have worked very hard on stabilizing my seat. That being said, I still have tons of work to do before I get there. I spend a lot of time on the longe line, and I have to say that nothing has been as helpful to me as these longe lessons.

                            I feel so inspired by all the recent talk of riders with disabilities. There are so many of us out there. It is wonderful to know that I am not the only one.
                            Sheilah

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              AS others have said, your seat and leg need work. However, what really is the most bothersome, and is most likely is stemming from seat problems is your hand with is constantly moving up and down and really interfering with your horse. He is quite a saint to handle that as well as he does. Your horse is cute, but honestly with your disability issues, I would have opted for a horse with less expressive gaits to begin my dressage career on. SO at this point you are going to have to invest in really learning to ride those gaits. Your left arm may be compromised by your CP but it also looks as if you are having a hard time dealing with carrying a whip in the hand. Can you either switch hands or perhaps lose the whip for a while? Your left hand is really interfering a lot with your horse. AS others have said, get on a lungeline regularly and do some exercises to strengthen your seat.
                              www.shawneeacres.net

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by Ambrey View Post
                                I notice your left arm comes back behind your right much of the time- I'm guessing that also has to do with your disability. I was wondering whether you could get a longer grab strap to loop a finger through and keep them symmetrical? Just a thought, might not be feasable.
                                That is a good thought, if I see something I'll try it.

                                Originally posted by Equibrit View Post
                                It would be worth your time trouble and money to invest in some REALLY GOOD seat lessons NOW. It will make your life a lot more enjoyable. If necessary go away to a trainer for a couple of weeks - but get 'er dun ! Don't let them blow hot air up your skirt either - it's hard boring work, but worth doing so that you don't develop bad habits.
                                This is what you are aiming for http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWh-lM1opkE and there is no reason why you can't achieve it ! Get your seat right now and you're half way there and you'll have a better "dressage seat" than most able bodied riders !!
                                I have a very good instructor, we are working hard on fixing it. I'm also doing a three day clinic with Janet Foy in October.

                                Originally posted by rabicon View Post
                                I had the hunter seat for a while after switching. I feel your pain. It will come, just think about sitting back. I will feel really weird but sit so you think your leaning wayyyy back in the saddle and more than likely you'll be correct. I still revert to the hunter ways in the canter sometimes. Its a hard habit to break after so many years of riding more forward.
                                My trainer tells me to think about lying down on his back, when I do I get to almost where she wants me.

                                Originally posted by IdahoRider View Post
                                Just like everyone else, I LOVE YOUR HORSE! You have a wonderful partner and teacher in this guy.

                                I also ride with a disability and have worked very hard on stabilizing my seat. That being said, I still have tons of work to do before I get there. I spend a lot of time on the longe line, and I have to say that nothing has been as helpful to me as these longe lessons.

                                I feel so inspired by all the recent talk of riders with disabilities. There are so many of us out there. It is wonderful to know that I am not the only one.
                                Sheilah
                                Me too! It is wonderful.

                                Originally posted by shawneeAcres View Post
                                AS others have said, your seat and leg need work. However, what really is the most bothersome, and is most likely is stemming from seat problems is your hand with is constantly moving up and down and really interfering with your horse. He is quite a saint to handle that as well as he does. Your horse is cute, but honestly with your disability issues, I would have opted for a horse with less expressive gaits to begin my dressage career on. SO at this point you are going to have to invest in really learning to ride those gaits. Your left arm may be compromised by your CP but it also looks as if you are having a hard time dealing with carrying a whip in the hand. Can you either switch hands or perhaps lose the whip for a while? Your left hand is really interfering a lot with your horse. AS others have said, get on a lungeline regularly and do some exercises to strengthen your seat.
                                After this show my trainer had me switch to the right hand, I am much more effective now. When we bought him, he was supposed to be a hunter. I got into dressage more on accident than on purpose, but I am really enjoying it now that I am here.
                                Ellie and Werther Blog

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Congratulations

                                  find someone, a Centered Riding instructor to help you find and then strengthen your center;and connecting your elbows to your center this will make a huge difference!; congratulations on your achievement! 9 years ago I set, in my mind the para Olympics as a goal; but, still have two major obstacles,

                                  1. a NARHA program which has an opening for me, and 2. a horse to ride.
                                  breeder of Mercury!

                                  remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Congratulations

                                    find someone, a Centered Riding instructor to help you find and then strengthen your center and connect your elbows to your center, this will make a huge difference!; congratulations on your achievement! 9 years ago I set, in my mind the para Olympics; but, still have two major obstacles,

                                    1. a NARHA program which has an opening for me, and 2. a horse to ride.
                                    breeder of Mercury!

                                    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      well done! you are extremely brave to post on here on COTH - keep doing what you're doing, you have a lovely horse, and you're riding very well. CP will always provide you with limits to what your body will acheive for you, especially in riding a horse with a big trot. But you have a lovely solid base of support, and you sound like you're riding with a trainer that helps you, and gives you support & confidence. Keep up the good work, and keep challenging yourself, you never know what you can achieve. Two riders we taught when they were much younger went on to compete for Canada, Para dressage, its a huge thrill to be able to say i was there when they were younger, and to see what they have achieved now.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        These days the Para division is just fabulous. There are so many participants at many different levels, and such a lot of good riding. It is really fun to watch.

                                        Comment

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