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Best ever photo of extended trot!

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  • #21
    Lovely picture. I'd kill for my lazy-assed horse to have that kind of power and scope.

    I deleted the rest of what I wrote because hopefully the person it was directed at has gone "home."
    Proud member of the draft cross clique!!! Mum to Normandy & Sar.
    http://hometown.aol.com/sarmoniet/index.html

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    • #22
      In my world all that matters is that i learn. and i try to see every thing as a learning opportunity. therefore, while i think it is a super picture (and i said so) , i would like to know *why* is it super? *what* makes it so wonderful and *how* could it be *better* ??

      i would lOVE to hear what the judges around here would say and what the comments would be if this were on a test.

      That creates a learning opportunity for all to learn from..

      (edited because i know better)

      Comment


      • #23
        Damn.... I was wrong.
        Proud member of the draft cross clique!!! Mum to Normandy & Sar.
        http://hometown.aol.com/sarmoniet/index.html

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        • #24
          what a lovely photo. Very, very nice.
          www.lizaustindressage.com
          http://www.imajica.net/stallion/olivier/profile/ Dutch Warmblood stallion, Olivier.

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          • #25
            I'd be THRILLED if I could ever get such a nice extended trot, let alone stay on the horse during it!!

            Who is the horse? He looks very powerful--gorgeous!!!

            Comment


            • #26
              Nice uphill extension.

              mbm, if all that matters in your world is that you learn, you ought to read up a little more and critique a little less. It is easy to find the requirements for a good extended trot. But since in your world, it does seem to be the case that you are motivated to learn unless someone spoon feeds you, here are some things that make a good extended trot;

              The trot should cover as much ground as the horse is capable of without losing balance, rhythym, engagement or purity.

              Though the horse's strides lengthens, his frame should not. Lengthening of the frame reveals a tendancy to use the bit for support, falling towards the forehand and loosing engagement.

              Diagonal pairs (hind and opposite front leg) should be parallel.

              Front feet should touch the ground at the spot to which they are pointing (no toe flipping or hypermobilization of the fetlock).

              One of the best ways to determine the quality of an extended trot is to evaluate the transition from extended to collected trot. If the horse is extending well, the transition will be smooth without any loss of impulsion or balance and the horse's quarters will obviously assume more weight in collection.

              Here is another picture of a good extended trot

              http://www.dressageworld.de/dressurg...lder/abb16.jpg
              See those flying monkeys? They work for me.

              Comment


              • #27
                the pic you posted is the one i posted long ago on the UDBB - thanks for posting it again....

                from the rules:
                Article 404 THE TROT
                1. The trot is a two beat pace of alternate diagonal legs (left fore and right hind
                leg and vice versa) separated by a moment of suspension.
                2. The trot should show free, active and regular steps.
                3. The quality of the trot is judged by general impression, i.e. the regularity and
                elasticity of the steps, the cadence and impulsion in both collection and
                extension. This quality originates from a supple back and well-engaged
                hindquarters, and by the ability of maintaining the same rhythm and natural
                balance with all variations of the trot.
                4. The following trots are recognised: Working trot, Lengthening of Steps,
                Collected trot, Medium trot and Extended trot.

                4.5. Extended trot. The horse covers as much ground as possible. Without hurrying, the steps are lengthened to the utmost as a result of great impulsionfrom the hindquarters. The rider allows the horse to lengthen the frame with a controlled poll, and to gain ground. The fore feet should touch the ground on the spot towards which they are pointing. The movement of the fore and hind legs should reach equally forward in the moment of extension. The whole movement should be well balanced and the transition to collected trot should be smoothly executed by taking more weight on the hindquarters."

                so, you are incorrect that the horse should not lengthen its frame. but were correct that the front foot should land where it is pointed (ie not toe flipping) ....

                to *me* it has been very benifical to hold the rules up against various photos and compare.... what is good ? what could be better? what is excellent?

                there i SO much to learn and so little time.

                (and if i spent any more time reading i wouldnt have time to ride , all joking aside, if you have suggestions to books i can add to my library that would be great)

                Comment


                • #28
                  I did the above post from memory but

                  checking the rules here is what I found.

                  US Equestrian Federation
                  Dressage Rules 2006
                  Section DR 104
                  Paragraph 4.d
                  "Extended trot. The horse covers as much ground as possible. Maintaining the same cadence as he lengthens his steps to the utmost as a result of great impulsion from the hindquarters. The riders allows the horse remaining on the bit without leaning on it to lengthen his frame and to gain ground....."

                  So to be more clear, it is my understanding that though a horse may lower its head and neck (and thereby lengthen its frame) in medium trot as compared to working trot, there should be no change from medium to extended trot, only the length of stride should change.
                  See those flying monkeys? They work for me.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    interesting that the wording is different... i got my quotes from here:

                    http://www.horsesport.org/PDFS/D/04_...ules2006-E.pdf

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Whilst that may be correct for USA..it is not in keeping with the FEI rules
                      go to page 9 of 87.extended trot
                      http://www.horsesport.org/PDFS/D/04_...ules2006-E.pdf
                      www.australiancolouredperformancehorses.com.au

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by nhwr
                        "Extended trot. The horse covers as much ground as possible. Maintaining the same cadence as he lengthens his steps to the utmost as a result of great impulsion from the hindquarters. The riders allows the horse remaining on the bit without leaning on it to lengthen his frame and to gain ground....."
                        The last sentence is so poorly written as to be confusing. Bad USEF proofreader! IMO, the meaning is intended to be that the horse should lengthen his frame without leaning on the bit and while remaining on the bit. Not, as nhwr reads it, that the horse should not lean on the bit and not lengthen his frame.

                        I believe the sentence is missing commas which would make it clear that this is a clause. I'd rewrite the sentence as:

                        "The rider allows the horse, remaining on the bit without leaning on it, to lengthen his frame and to gain ground."

                        In other words, you could delete the clause and the meaning of the sentence remains "The rider allows the horse to lengthen his frame and gain ground."

                        This fits with my understanding of the extended gaits, which is that the horse's frame does lengthen along with the stride. Look at the definition for extended canter, for example.

                        I think the picture is lovely. I love the absolutely parallel cannon bones and the overall impression of traveling uphill. The only slight flaws I see are a minor toe flip/hyperextension of the joints and the rider appears a bit braced (this may be a trick of the photo and not reality).

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          FEI rules, from belambi's link: http://www.horsesport.org/PDFS/D/04_...ules2006-E.pdf

                          Extended trot. The horse covers as much ground as possible. Without hurrying, the steps are lengthened to the utmost as a result of great impulsion from the hindquarters. The rider allows the horse to lengthen the frame with a controlled poll, and to gain ground. The fore feet should touch the ground on the spot towards which they are pointing. The movement of the fore and hind legs should reach equally forward in the moment of extension. The whole movement should be well balanced and the transition to collected trot should be smoothly executed by taking more weight on the hindquarters.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Absolutely-- that careless photog should have waited a fraction of a second.
                            Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                            Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by belambi
                              Whilst that may be correct for USA..it is not in keeping with the FEI rules
                              Is that a dig on the US?

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Hmmmm

                                Reading the FEI rules, I guess my question would be lengthen frame relative to what? If the comparison is to working or collected trot, that is consistent with what I have been taught and how I have ridden it. But if the comparison is to medium trot......I am not saying I have the creds to dispute what the FEI says but I think their definition is somewhat unclear.

                                Here is how I think of it; the trot (or any gait really) in order of the education of the horse

                                working trot, collected, medium and then extended trot.

                                In extended trot, the horse is to demonstrate the ability to lengthen its stride without losing engagement, impulsion or balance relative to the previous level of development (working, collected and medium trot). Extended trot a product of collection. Think of how a horse lengthens its frame. This is done by either less rounding through the back (loss of engagement/collection) or lower the head and neck (change in balance). An extended trot should demonstrate that a horse can further lengthen its stride, relative to medium trot without loss of engagement or balance. I take this to mean that the horse should not loose engagment (be less round through its back) or loose balance (lower its head and or neck). Medium trot is meant to be a transitional phase of development between collected and extended. This is why the horse is allowed to lower it neck and head in medium. It wouldn't make sense that in extended trot, where the developmental demands are higher, that the horse would be allowed to demonstrate a still lesser degree of balance, would it?

                                So the real question; in extended trot should the frame lengthen relative to medium trot? I don't think so. Relative to collected? Certainly. Relative to working? Yes. Relative to medium? No.
                                Last edited by nhwr; Jul. 15, 2006, 02:20 AM.
                                See those flying monkeys? They work for me.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  lol..no..not meant as a dig to the USA..meant to say..whilst it is correct according to the US EF rule as was posted..
                                  www.australiancolouredperformancehorses.com.au

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    So the real question; in extended trot should the frame lengthen relative to medium trot? I don't think so. Relative to collected? Certainly. Relative to working? Yes. Relative to medium? No.
                                    In tests, the extended gaits are always asked for out of a collected gait, right? So a lengthening of the frame makes sense in that respect. You wouldn't go from a medium to an extension.

                                    I think I still disagree though: I think that the frame in a medium is slightly different from the frame in an extension. But it's OK if you and I disagree, no one cares.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      FYI, for those who don't subscribe to the mag, the horse is Liberty, a Dutch stallion. Not sure of his breeding, but his piaffe and passage are particularly impressive as well. He is also an incredibly beautiful color - very shiny chestnut.
                                      spriesersporthorse.com | farm on Facebook | me on Facebook | blog

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                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by pinecone

                                        The only thing "easy" about dressage, it would appear, is criticizing it. (rolling eyes)

                                        ROFL
                                        ~*Ride Far*~Ride Well~*~ The Sky's the Limit~
                                        www.firstgiving.com/christinahyke

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                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by pinecone
                                          :

                                          The only thing "easy" about dressage, it would appear, is criticizing it. (rolling eyes)
                                          Originally posted by Trakehners2000
                                          ROFL
                                          now that i think about it..... i dont think it is so easy to critique correctly.... otherwise there would be many many more judges.... since they are the ultimate critiquers - yes?

                                          i think that it is very hard to really *see* the fine details of what makes dressage dressage. its easy to say - yes that trot is the best ever! but it isnt as easy to then really LOOK at it and try to analyze *why* you feel that way and/or really look and see if it is indeed as good as originally thought.

                                          each time i get into one of these discussions (critiquing photos) i learn something. *especially* if it is about something that i take for granted or that i *know* i am right about.

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