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Bare foot transitioning, boots, and showing

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    Bare foot transitioning, boots, and showing

    My understanding is that hoof protection aside from nailed on shoes or glued on shoes is not currently permitted in the USDF shows? What about warm up rings?

    Please share your experiences and words of advice regarding transitioning horses from shoes to bare feet.

    What do you do at shows if your horse is not quite ready to work barefoot? Or walk on the gravely, stony paths between arenas barefoot but is ok in the rings?
    Horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.

    #2
    any kind of boots (including "easyboots")
    or bandages (including tail bandages) and any form of blinkers, earmuffs or
    plugs, nose covers, seat covers, hoods are, under penalty of elimination, strictly forbidden.
    Shoes with or without cuffs that are attached with nails or glue and that do
    not extend past the hair line of the hoof are permitted.


    these rules apply both in the show ring and the warm up ring

    one exception for the warm up is protective ( splint , bell or polo wrap) boots are permitted. But not hoof easy boots.

    I can offer no advice on the barefoot transition. For showing you may wish to visit a venue and see exactly how much potential impact getting around the grounds and from warm up to the show ring will have. I know of very few venues in my area where you would not have some gravel or asphalt to walk on to the warm up from the stables. At my favorite venue it would be very little, but it would be present.

    and you cannot always guarantee the quality of the ring footing.

    You may wish to postpone your showing until your horse is more fit to the task without his shoes.
    Last edited by hoopoe; Jan. 14, 2014, 09:08 AM.
    _\\]
    -- * > hoopoe
    Procrastinate NOW
    Introverted Since 1957

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      #3
      Either don't go to the show and let the horse adjust to being barefoot or wait to pull the shoes until after the show. If the ground is frozen at all in your area I would not recommend pulling shoes right now since the hard ground would be torture enough of the feet.

      That being said, you won't know until after you pull the shoes how a horse will adjust. Some take quite a while to get used to footings and will stay sensitive to harder ground while other horses (like mine) can be ridden on just about any surface within days of pulling the shoes (the only surface he still gets a little ouchy on is sharp gravel and he is being more careful on the frozen ground)
      "I'm too sexy for my blanket, too sexy for my blanket, these mares-they should take it..." (J-Lu) - Featuring The Skypizzle Pony aka Classic Skyline

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        #4
        Originally posted by mzm farm View Post

        What do you do at shows if your horse is not quite ready to work barefoot? Or walk on the gravely, stony paths between arenas barefoot but is ok in the rings?
        Have glue-ons put on for the show and then take them back off again. There are also a lot of different products that can be bonded to the hoof to add temporary protection.

        Another possibly is to get a barefoot trimmer who understands that a horse with thin soles needs more wall, or if you're trimming your own horse be more careful about leaving as much hoof as possible while you're transitioning him to barefoot. The hoof doesn't always look as nice when you do that, but a horse who doesn't have enough hoof needs all the bits and pieces he can retain while he's working on growing more.

        If the problem is the gravel pathways, get off and help him pick his way across the stones, or put boots on him for that and then take them off when you get to the better footing. There are several types of light duty boots that are much easier to put on and take off than some of the more stable ones, so it's not difficult to carry them along and just get off and put them on when needed, and then take them off on softer footing.

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          #5
          There are several types of light duty boots that are much easier to put on and take off than some of the more stable ones, so it's not difficult to carry them along and just get off and put them on when needed, and then take them off on softer footing.


          rules apply on the show grounds, not just in the warm up and show ring. The artificial hoof covers would not be permitted as you describe
          _\\]
          -- * > hoopoe
          Procrastinate NOW
          Introverted Since 1957

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            #6
            All of my horses are barefoot, and a few will walk *carefully* over sharp gravel. (not super ouchy, just not completely carefree)

            I ignore it. They are fine in the ring and so far walking a few hundred feet on gravel or pavement with an ocasional sharp rock hasn't caused a cascade of problems.

            I had a student who would put Old Macs on their horse to trailer him because once unloaded, he'd have to walk TWENTY FEET on a gravel parking lot to get to the barn aisle....where she would then take off his boots. I thought that was overkill, and that he could survive the twenty feet of barefoot gravel if I could. (I demonstrated one day that while I looked "lame" on the gravel when I was barefoot, it didn't mean it was making me permanently lame!)

            So, I don't know how sensitive your horses are, but if they are sound and free-moving in the ring, but a little careful on hard stuff, you could simply lead them to the ring and mount there.
            If its a schooling show, I may be a little skeptical about the arena footing, and check it out before entering. I would think that recognized show footing should be free of rocks.

            Comment


              #7
              I'm not sure if production easyshoes are out to the general public now or not, but I know one of the articles about the US Championships said Akiko Yamazaki rode in them in her winning ride, so they are legal at least.

              I didn't go to rated shows in the last year specifically because I wanted to be able to put on boots and keep my horse comfortable any time he possibly needed them. Just under a year into the transition we're barefoot all the time including on more challenging surfaces, and the things Kande mentioned are a big part of why.

              Then again, my horse is barefoot because his hooves were in bad shape and frequent trims to help the angle was necessary for the good of his soft tissue and any encounters with rocky ground would make him lame with shoes on. For me the transition was unquestionably needed to fix his problems long-term, and losing one year of showing while continuing to work and improve wasn't a big deal.


              We did do a schooling show where I used boots in the warmup and took them off before entering the show ring. The warmup footing was questionable at best, but show ring had very nice footing and that worked for us. I actually didn't know you couldn't use hoof boots in warmup at a rated show given you can use other kinds of boots which aren't allowed in competition - and didn't have to find out for myself.
              If Kim Kardashian wants to set up a gofundme to purchase the Wu Tang album from Martin Shkreli, guess what people you DON'T HAVE TO DONATE.
              -meupatdoes

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                #8
                Have your farrier try this. It lasts for about two weeks but you'll want to try it before any showing. It's great to transition horses from shoes to barefoot on a temporary basis if boots can't be worn.

                http://vettec.com/sole-guard-180cc

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by hoopoe View Post
                  There are several types of light duty boots that are much easier to put on and take off than some of the more stable ones, so it's not difficult to carry them along and just get off and put them on when needed, and then take them off on softer footing.


                  rules apply on the show grounds, not just in the warm up and show ring. The artificial hoof covers would not be permitted as you describe
                  All the rule says is that boots including "easyboots" are not permitted in the the ring but that boots and bandages without magnets are permitted in the warmup/ training areas (so nothing one way or the other about protective OR hoof boots in the warmup).

                  Your best bet is to email or call the USEF dressage liaison and request clarification. That said, I wouldn't expect the horse to compete until it is okay to walk comfortably on a short stretch of gravel/ blacktop or warmup on reasonable footing.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Would a glue on easyboot fit into the boot category or glue on shoe category? They would not extend past the hairline. Distance riders use a type of foam to glue them on for a single day.

                    http://www.easycareinc.com/our_boots...t_glue-on.aspx
                    Equine Portrait Commissions and Sporting Art
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                      #11
                      Can't imagine a glue on easy boot would be legal (looks like easy boots are specifically prohibited).

                      Only way to verify would be to email USEF.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        This is an example of where the rules need to be updated to fit the reality. In my area more and more people are getting their horses out of nailed-on shoes and into barefoot/EasyBoots. It's totally gone mainstream. People have discovered it's not only frequently better for their horses, particularly those ridden mostly on good footing, but it reduces the major expense of shoeing to about 20% for trims.

                        I can see no earthly reason why a nailed-on (or glued-on) shoe should be legal but a "temporary" shoe like an EasyBoot should not be. There is no performance advantage nor detriment, and the rule book should not be encouraging an archaic (and arguably invasive) hoof protection system over a more modern one.

                        Competing completely barefoot MIGHT be a disadvantage, depending on the footing.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I can see no earthly reason why any animal who is so footsore it needs boots to *walk* on gravel should be subjected to showing under saddle.
                          "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                          ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
                            This is an example of where the rules need to be updated to fit the reality. In my area more and more people are getting their horses out of nailed-on shoes and into barefoot/EasyBoots. It's totally gone mainstream. People have discovered it's not only frequently better for their horses, particularly those ridden mostly on good footing, but it reduces the major expense of shoeing to about 20% for trims.

                            I can see no earthly reason why a nailed-on (or glued-on) shoe should be legal but a "temporary" shoe like an EasyBoot should not be. There is no performance advantage nor detriment, and the rule book should not be encouraging an archaic (and arguably invasive) hoof protection system over a more modern one.

                            Competing completely barefoot MIGHT be a disadvantage, depending on the footing.
                            Agree completely with this. All you would have to do is take off the boots in tack check.

                            My boy is sounder barefoot than he is in shoes. Hoping to get him back into work and eventually show him again. In Canada, we can have hoof boots in warmup at least. I show at Bronze level shows where the footing may not be optimum (and can be stony, for instance, in the warmup).

                            If this works, I'm wondering how he will transition from the footing in the warmup with hoof boots on to the footing in the arena if we only have a few minutes to get him used to it before the test.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Vesper Sparrow View Post
                              Agree completely with this. All you would have to do is take off the boots in tack check.

                              My boy is sounder barefoot than he is in shoes. Hoping to get him back into work and eventually show him again. In Canada, we can have hoof boots in warmup at least. I show at Bronze level shows where the footing may not be optimum (and can be stony, for instance, in the warmup).

                              If this works, I'm wondering how he will transition from the footing in the warmup with hoof boots on to the footing in the arena if we only have a few minutes to get him used to it before the test.
                              It's not a big deal for a horse who is comfortable bootless working at home. I think my guy has to be one of the most reactive horses ever to anything resembling hoof discomfort, and we didn't show until he comfortably worked bootless at home plus was running and playing happily in his turnout with much firmer footing. Warmup at our show had bad footing, and we took the boots off immediately before entering the show ring -he had zero adjustment.
                              If Kim Kardashian wants to set up a gofundme to purchase the Wu Tang album from Martin Shkreli, guess what people you DON'T HAVE TO DONATE.
                              -meupatdoes

                              Comment


                                #16
                                Originally posted by Vesper Sparrow View Post

                                If this works, I'm wondering how he will transition from the footing in the warmup with hoof boots on to the footing in the arena if we only have a few minutes to get him used to it before the test.
                                None of mine have ever had any problems going from bare to boots (or shoes) and vice versa, and I add or subtract hoof protection on a regular basis, including nailed on shoes and boots with aggressive ice calks.

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  Renagade boots

                                  I use renagade boots i really like them i only use them when i need them the cost about $170 for a pair but they last

                                  Comment


                                    #18
                                    I have a set of Cavallo Sports for my barefoot gelding with wussy feet. Yes, you can use them in warmup, and the beauty of the velcro means anyone can take them off in 30 seconds.

                                    Durasole: make it your best friend and just follow the directions.

                                    If said wussy foot has to cross gravel, he is fine doing so slowly at a walk and has no issues at all working in prepared footing. I only use the boots if we will encounter rocks.
                                    Life doesn't have perfect footing.

                                    Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
                                    We Are Flying Solo

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                                      #19
                                      Depending on whether your horse has any hoof pathology, the transition phase can take anywhere from 6-9 months. Durasole is very good at toughening up a hoof. If your horse is ouchy on gravel there is no shame in putting on boots to comfortably get across it. Renegades are really easy to take on and off and personally I would much rather err on the side of comfort. I would be hesitant to show a horse who still needed boots to work comfortably in a well maintained arena.

                                      Comment


                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by JLR1 View Post
                                        Depending on whether your horse has any hoof pathology, the transition phase can take anywhere from 6-9 months.
                                        Or up to two years. Don't ask how I know.
                                        Life doesn't have perfect footing.

                                        Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
                                        We Are Flying Solo

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