• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Soaking your leg wraps with them ON the horse? Wrapping with straw?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Soaking your leg wraps with them ON the horse? Wrapping with straw?

    I was at a hunter/jumper show today, and there was a known dressage rider there and she did some things that I have never seen done before and wondered what and why.
    As a hunter/jumper rider, I am very used to leg wrapping/poulticing.
    Apply poultice to legs. Place wet paper towel/paper (or some people are now using wax paper) on the leg over top of poultice. Wrap with quilts/no bows and wraps. The poultice helps draw any heat out of the leg as it dries, the wet paper towel helps keep the poultice wet longer and keeps the wraps clean, and the wraps compress and 'support'.
    This dressage rider had her horse wrapped with the thick pillow quilts, it appeared from the leg that I could see well that the horse was wrapped with straw under it's wraps. It could be that they just wrapped in the stall and so got some straw stuck under the wrap, but it wasn't just a stray piece or 2, the whole side that I could see had straw sticking out the bottom of it. She then took a good 5 mins per leg and soaked the wraps with a hose getting them completely drenched.
    Is this a common dressage practice? Is it supposed to do the same thing as poultice and wrapping? It seems like it would be uncomfortable and it seemed that the weight of the soaked wraps would encourage them to slide down/not stay in place well. If you do do this why do you do it instead of the poultice method?

  • #2
    Originally posted by ElisLove View Post
    I was at a hunter/jumper show today, and there was a known dressage rider there and she did some things that I have never seen done before and wondered what and why.
    As a hunter/jumper rider, I am very used to leg wrapping/poulticing.
    Apply poultice to legs. Place wet paper towel/paper (or some people are now using wax paper) on the leg over top of poultice. Wrap with quilts/no bows and wraps. The poultice helps draw any heat out of the leg as it dries, the wet paper towel helps keep the poultice wet longer and keeps the wraps clean, and the wraps compress and 'support'.
    This dressage rider had her horse wrapped with the thick pillow quilts, it appeared from the leg that I could see well that the horse was wrapped with straw under it's wraps. It could be that they just wrapped in the stall and so got some straw stuck under the wrap, but it wasn't just a stray piece or 2, the whole side that I could see had straw sticking out the bottom of it. She then took a good 5 mins per leg and soaked the wraps with a hose getting them completely drenched.
    Is this a common dressage practice? Is it supposed to do the same thing as poultice and wrapping? It seems like it would be uncomfortable and it seemed that the weight of the soaked wraps would encourage them to slide down/not stay in place well. If you do do this why do you do it instead of the poultice method?
    Allow me to go out on a limb and say "no". This is not common dressage practice". Actually, this reminds me of older basic horsemanship remedies - the straw was used to draw fluids/heat out of the tendons/legs, not unlike a modern poulstice. There are much better remedies these days, but perhaps this trainer was trained by a very "old school" person and wants to keep the practice. Intentionally wetting wraps, as opposed to applying graded wetness in the wraps to draw out fluid? I have no idea.
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation

    Comment


    • #3
      An earlier method for cooling legs was cold water hosing & before that, standing the horse knee-deep in a cold stream.

      I would also expect the weight of the water to drag the wraps down.

      Maybe those were the tools she had at hand at the show - sometimes you make do with what you've got.
      Hidden Echo Farm, Carlisle, PA -- home of JC palomino sire Canadian Kid (1990 - 2013) & AQHA sire Lark's Favorite, son of Rugged Lark.

      Comment


      • #4
        After we would ice a horse before a race we would put on "cold waters" (wet, cold wraps) to take him to the saddling area but I've never seen the straw. Interesting...
        Groom to trainer: "Where's the glamour? You promised me glamour!"

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thanks for the replies.
          I understand cold hosing and have done it more than I care to say, but spraying down the wraps was a new one for me.
          So sounds like this is maybe something that might be super old school that isn't done anymore (at least the straw part, who knows about the soaking part!)

          Comment


          • #6
            Hard to know really. The horse may have allergies and this solves her problems.
            ... _. ._ .._. .._

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by Equibrit View Post
              Hard to know really. The horse may have allergies and this solves her problems.
              Interesting, how do you think it could help with allergies?

              Comment


              • #8
                Interesting!

                FWIW, I don't think the soaked wraps will do lots of good. You'd be surprised how much even the lower legs can heat up..... so the water will get warm, too. And, man, if your horse has any ideas about skin skank, this surely would set him off.
                The armchair saddler
                Politically Pro-Cat

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have seen people soak the no bows or quilts before putting them on sopping wet but not wetting them after they were on the horse.
                  McDowell Racing Stables

                  Home Away From Home

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by Laurierace View Post
                    I have seen people soak the no bows or quilts before putting them on sopping wet but not wetting them after they were on the horse.
                    Hmm, I'ver never seen anyone soak leg wraps before at all. How come they were soaking the wraps?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Same reason, keep the poultice from drying out longer.
                      McDowell Racing Stables

                      Home Away From Home

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        And the wraps stayed in place well and didn't cause any issues? It seems like the wraps would be super heavy.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I didn't say I had done it, just that I had seen it done. I saw pretty much everything you can think of in over two decades on the track. I personally stopped using poultice many, many years ago. I think it's main benefit is the half hour that it takes to wash the stuff off. Much better, easier alternatives in my opinion. For just every day sort of thing, not an actual injury I like Sore No More and Back on Track no bows.
                          McDowell Racing Stables

                          Home Away From Home

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Laurierace View Post
                            I think it's main benefit is the half hour that it takes to wash the stuff off. Much better, easier alternatives in my opinion.
                            Not if you are me and 2 minutes into a prescribed 20 minutes of cold-hosing, you ask, "Are we there yet?"

                            The spraying off those chips of poultice is probably where the good is.

                            Oh, and poultice can turn around and heat up if you leave it on too long. I've personally done that. Oops.
                            The armchair saddler
                            Politically Pro-Cat

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Was she wetting the wraps to soften/ disolve the poltice and to remove the straw that was stuck in the wrap? Did all four leg wraps have straw or just one?

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I think she was just plain weird...

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  As an aside, I had someone tell me that you had to make sure there was never any straw underneath the bandage because it would penetrate the skin and scratch the periosteum. I told her she could spend the rest of her life trying to scratch the periosteum with a piece of straw and she couldn't do it! I also had someone tell me not to swim my race horses because the water would make their tendons soggy forever. I guess they thought tendons were made out of white bread.
                                  McDowell Racing Stables

                                  Home Away From Home

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I also had someone tell me not to swim my race horses because the water would make their tendons soggy forever. I guess they thought tendons were made out of white bread.
                                    ROFLMAO...but wait, this may explain alot, my horse puts his head under water so maybe he just has a soggy brain!!!
                                    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Well, I guess I have a sorta answer. Someone on another board posted this:
                                      Ive this done before! It wasnt by a dressage rider tho. many moons ago I worked at a racetrack and one of the "OLD" grooms used to do this! I'll tell you what he told me. You wet the leg, start grabbing from you clean pile of straw(he used loose straw not baled, and it looked like he had picked through them one by one as they were in a perfect pattern of up 'n' down and sorted them) he would then, hold the straw and the start of a pillow wrap and pack 'n' wrap around the leg. Once the pillow wrap was on he would take the outer leg wrap and wrap the leg a tish on the tight side. I was told this was to hold it once it was wet and the pillow wrap flattened a tish. Then he would wet the whole leg for a good 15 min. He would lean in while wetting it and working from the bottom of the wrap he would massage up the wrap. This not only massaged the horses leg it pushed ice cold water into and out of the wrap the whole time. While he was working on the massaging bit he would lean over a bit and let the hose fill the bucket the horses back legs were in....well really it was the other 3 legs. Since he did always put all 4 legs into ice cold water to start with. So ok, ice water buckets on all 4 legs, get your needed supplies, pull out one leg, wrap it, massage/hose it, while massaging fill one of the other three buckets starting with the hind of the leg your working on. Why? Because that leg is going to be last so it will have to wait the longest with no attn.. He would also rotate which leg he would start on each time he did this..which in this case was daily...monday left front, tues..left rear..you see where this is going.. I kind of his thinking to be a bit ocd'ish but Ive learned better since then. Once he was done with the massage/hosing on all 4 legs. He would walk the horse for 5 min. , pop him/her into a stall so deep with fresh straw the horse had to just about wade in....think of the heaven the horse must have felt...walking into that stall after a hard run in any kind of weather or footing...they each got a warm mash, their hay and were left alone in a stall far in the back away from the noise and doings of a racetrack barn. He'd leave em back there until when during one of his 30 min checks on them. The horse would meet him at the stall door. He said that was the horses way of telling him he'd refreshed himself and was ready for more of the 24/7 stress of being a racehorse. Then he would unwrap the legs, rub some wintergreen oil, peppermint oil and olive oil mixture into their legs and put them back in their normal stall on the main row. He said he uses straw because its hollow, as he hoses the straw fills up with cold water, while he massages it pushed that now warmed by the hot leg water out, then repeat...its the hand done way of one of them high dollar bubbling leg boot icing kits..Boss dont need to spend money on that kind of stuff whiles hes got me...Remember this was when leg boot bubbling boots were seen only in major vet hospitals...not trackside. This old guy had to 90 if he was a day, maybe I was just that young..I was 8. I worked the track the next 4 summers with him. I learned many things from him...many thought he was an old good for nothing groom who didnt know when to hang it up. He told once he was just waiting for the right person to pass it along to..someone who will share it. I do a lot of things with my horses the old way, it takes longer, its harder to do as in you have to do the work not some fancy bubbling boot, you learn what your horses legs feel like when they are right, you'll know when they are off even a tish, and the bond one gets with that horse, in knowing that animal is amazing. I do believe we have to take care of our horses for them to be able to take care of us.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Thank you so much for sharing that story, it was wonderful.
                                        Kanoe Godby
                                        www.dyrkgodby.com
                                        See, I was raised by wolves and am really behind the 8-ball on diplomatic issue resolution.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X