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Riding With a "Bucking Strap"?

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  • #61
    Originally posted by myrna View Post
    i really am astounded sometimes by the responses and negativity of the replies when someone admits to using an aid that gives a little comfort if needed.
    Seriously.

    If anyone would like to make fun of me for the fact that just YESTERDAY a horse I was schooling at a horse show was in such a tizzy I made the owner lead me around in a circle in varying stages of "grabbing the cheek strap" "leading us by the longe line," and "stand in the middle holding the longe line while we walk around you," and all in full view of the rest of the horse show that happened to be walking by, prompting us to joke ruefully amongst ourselves wondering if the leadline class was open to professionals, they are more than welcome to do so if it makes them feel better about themselves. Some people have the owner lead them around to make themselves feel better and try to finish the horse's day on a positive note, other people sling needless insults around.

    They are also more than welcome to hop on that horse, which I suspect they will never do.

    And some day when I ride down center line at Devon on the (different) horse I have ridden since his first ride I will tell myself "I rode nuts horses on longe lines at 4-H horseshows to help pay for my journey to get here, so help me God." If someone wants a bucking strap for their journey because it makes them feel braver to take the risk to go for it and get in that saddle and push a little extra in the extensions or whatever it helps them do, sign up below and I will paypal toward the cause.
    The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
    Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
    Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
    The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

    Comment


    • #62
      I have a question about the stirrup leathers around the neck, or the neck straps. What happens if the horse lowers his head to stretch?

      I am one who pulled the Dee out by grabbing the strap in a big spook on Chicho. It sounded like an air horn went off! Attach the straps with Dee Savers to your stirrup bars.

      They are invaluable for longeing riders. They are also helpful for correcting your seat. Chicho has a lofty passage, and I would try to pull myself down with it. After awhile, I started pulling him UP with it. Hilda Gurney said once that Keen's extension was so bouncy she grabbed the strap frequently but discretely while showing.

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      • #63
        I'm late to this thread so apologize if this has already been mentioned, but I was surprised to see a bucking strap at the WEF week 12 grand prix this year. Photo here - http://www.shemovedtotexas.com/wp-co...417-232155.jpg

        I've only used them for fox hunting, where it's been a good thing more than once!
        My Blog - www.shemovedtotexas.com

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        • #64
          Oddly enough I've never had that happen -the neck strap crawling down to Fella's ears. I don't know why. Mine is a cord with two carabiners. Is it the weight?

          Paula
          He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by ZiptotheStar View Post
            I'm late to this thread so apologize if this has already been mentioned, but I was surprised to see a bucking strap at the WEF week 12 grand prix this year. Photo here - http://www.shemovedtotexas.com/wp-co...417-232155.jpg

            I've only used them for fox hunting, where it's been a good thing more than once!
            LOL! Clearly a sissy.

            Paula
            He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

            Comment


            • #66
              Meup and others, I'm still curious if in your experience these pommel-attached straps have any beneficial physical effect with regard to keeping the rider in the saddle. I understand using them for confidence-giving, but I still wonder if they really work because to me it looks like they have quite a range of motion. I'm really not bothered if people want to use them, I'm simply curious about the mechanics (I never was any good at physics!).

              What I am resistant to is the prospect of holding onto the pommel area for schooling purposes, which is what was suggested in the OP (to fix a bulging neck). I think I was clear in my posts about that.

              Thankfully my horse-starting days are (almost) behind me, so this is just theoretical bemusement on my part!
              Proud COTH lurker since 2001.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by Lost_at_C View Post
                Meup and others, I'm still curious if in your experience these pommel-attached straps have any beneficial physical effect with regard to keeping the rider in the saddle. I understand using them for confidence-giving, but I still wonder if they really work because to me it looks like they have quite a range of motion. I'm really not bothered if people want to use them, I'm simply curious about the mechanics (I never was any good at physics!).

                What I am resistant to is the prospect of holding onto the pommel area for schooling purposes, which is what was suggested in the OP (to fix a bulging neck). I think I was clear in my posts about that.

                Thankfully my horse-starting days are (almost) behind me, so this is just theoretical bemusement on my part!
                I do not use one. My post detailing the trip down the three stride line hanging off the side of the horse was to wonder if perhaps holding a grab strap would have prevented that in the first place.

                As for the horse at the 4-H show yesterday, no way in HAYULL would I have still got on that one with just a grab strap. No no, we were in full-on "lead us around with the longe line through the near side bit ring and over his ears to the other side" mode. My personal opinion is that I don't generally grab for the pommel when the s*t hits the fan and from observation I too think there is too much range of motion to really be helpful, so it's not a tool I use.

                That said, if I can find it helpful to have an owner lead me around at a horseshow like a lead line kid, I will not begrudge anyone else who finds a grab strap to be the ticket for them. Can't really make fun of someone for holding a bucking strap the day after you got leadlined around at 4-H! Of course I was aware while this was going on that not everyone who saw me getting led around thought, "Wow, she must have a good reason for that!" and probably some people derived whatever amount of enjoyment from making fun of me out of earshot and perhaps comparisons were made to me being a sissy 4yo or the like but whatever. I stayed on and the horse ended on a good note walking quietly around on a loose rein, which no one could recall a living memory where he did THAT at a horse show so there's that.
                The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                Comment


                • #68
                  Meup - Re your reply to Myrna - sounds like you mis-understood her post (or I did) - one or the other of us.

                  My last dressage instructor suggested I use my pinky and keep it stuck to the horse's neck to avoid the OP's problem and to steady my hand. I think it kept my hand a bit to low, but at least in the correct riding position.
                  Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Lost_at_C View Post
                    Meup and others, I'm still curious if in your experience these pommel-attached straps have any beneficial physical effect with regard to keeping the rider in the saddle. I understand using them for confidence-giving, but I still wonder if they really work because to me it looks like they have quite a range of motion. I'm really not bothered if people want to use them, I'm simply curious about the mechanics (I never was any good at physics!).
                    To answer this part, for myself anyways, if Herself decided that she needed to take off bucking or the whatnot, it helps pull my seat deeper into the saddle and therefore ride out whatever shenningans that she decided to grace me with.

                    I also use it to help keep myself with the motion when she leaps forward when/if I crack her one on the badonk. It's a premeditated thing for me, so I can grab the strap before I tap her. She has a HUGE motor so it's a bit like punching the gas pedal on a Porchse when you are normally used to a Prius. It's helped me not catch her in the mouth or thump onto her back in those moments because I can balance on the strap.

                    It may be one of those things that you have to try for yourself to really understand the benefit of.

                    I'm not really sure how it would be used in the sense that the OP is talking about. I can only speak for myself.

                    And Meup... how I could wish that they had a Open Leadline Class sometimes. Just thinking about taking Herself into the ring for the first time kind of makes me sweat, and I'm not a nervous person!

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      You can grab the strap with one hand and use the other to double a horse if necessary.
                      I'm not talking about looking pretty in the dressage arena, I'm talking about staying in the saddle rather than becoming a lawn dart.
                      "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                      ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

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                      • #71
                        I used to have one on my saddle all the time, but never used it for security. For some reason they're too low to help (me) in an emergency -- it's more expedient for me to grab mane That said, my saddler recommends them for mounting; he says not to grab the pommel directly, but again, if I need extra "jump" when mounting I grab mane too.
                        Piaffe Girl -- Dressage. Fashionably.
                        http://piaffegirl.wordpress.com/
                        https://www.facebook.com/PiaffeGirl

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                        • #72
                          I always imagine I'll break a pinkie finger on one, I am not smart enough to discern the proper physics of using one for anything good- but no, I don't think they declare one incompetent anymore than a helmet encourages one to take more risks.

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                          • #73
                            oh for gods sake!

                            make me Sissy #4 and be done with it!

                            and frankly - who gives a rats patootie about the line from my elbow to bit when horse is doing the super spin or other creative moves?

                            sheesh. i cant believe how uptight some folks are

                            and.... i use it for lunging, to clip unused side reins to, to loop neck strap thru if needed on babies, to carry my saddle with, all sorts of reasons!

                            i have stickers that say "SISSY" that i am happy to attach on my car or whatnot if that makes people feel better?

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              MBM, if you're referring to me I can only apologise for my natural curiosity and analytical approach to, well, everything. I was a trainer and instructor for two decades before I took up full-time academia, so I suppose my dogged pursuit of technical knowledge may indeed come across as "uptight" on occasion.

                              For those who answered my query, thank you! I am suspecting now that a pommel strap might allow riders to engage their core muscles without tightening the hips and thighs... that actually makes sense to me. I've always tended to grab mane in wild situations because it allows me to brace as well as pull, and with my hands further up the neck I have more spread-out points of contact with the horse - but I suppose this varied depending on relative horse and rider conformation. And I still can't see how a strap can be used effectively as a schooling aid. Again, I'm sorry if I'm offending people by belabouring my analysis, but I am truly interested in biomechanics and teaching tools. I'm not deemed a nerd for nothing.

                              Oh, and Meup, add me to the list of prize-winning adult lead-liners! At 50-plus I've decided I simply don't want to be starting my young Arab on road work without someone leading us from the ground (it doesn't help that his 'older-wiser' hacking mate is also an Arab)... yes, it looks silly and I'm probably not being a very effective rider, but dammit that pavement looks HARD.
                              Proud COTH lurker since 2001.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
                                I haven't used a sissy strap since I was 4. My mother called it that for good reason. It breaks the line from elbow to bit, raises the rider's center of gravity, and disengages their core.
                                Well, for me, while I can see it's possible use for stability issues, I just don't get it's efficacy if you really think a horse is going to buck/be rank. When my horse - in his younger days and occasionally still - gets stupid, I want/need BOTH hands to get him back under control. If I merely held onto the saddle/bucking strap, I'd be on the ground in no time.

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  Originally posted by narcisco View Post
                                  I have a question about the stirrup leathers around the neck, or the neck straps. What happens if the horse lowers his head to stretch?
                                  I've never had that happen and my mare likes to stretch down. If they're good enough for William Fox Pitt, they're good enough for me, a weeny and exponentially less good rider by several factors of 10, LOL. I see Bit of Britain also carries them in a cheaper nylon version.

                                  I have put a grab strap on my saddle but never used it except in longing lessons. I instinctively grab for my neck strap but never for the grab strab.

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    Lost-at-C - no, not you - but just the general "feel" from some on this thread and one poster in particular.

                                    I dont think many people use a bucking strap for bucking.... but it is very useful for many many many things as i mentioned up thread....

                                    here are things i use it for daily:

                                    attaching side reins when not in use
                                    as a handle for carrying saddle.
                                    as a hand steadier if needed.
                                    back in the day i used to run my reins under it to help me learn to have not busy hands.
                                    i also tie my reins to it when lunging.
                                    when getting lunge lessons it is really useful.
                                    and if there are times when baby is potentially going to explode i do put my thumb around it - just in case -

                                    but i do want to say that i used to have a real one that was leather with buckles, but on my new stubben for some reason it gave me bruises (?) so now i have some baling twine and it works a treat!

                                    SISSY stickers applied with pride!

                                    Comment


                                    • #78
                                      Originally posted by Bogie View Post
                                      A stirrup leather placed strategically forward works much better than mane. Plus, the pressure of the strap on the horse's neck is very good at steadying them. I can walk/trot/canter my horse just off pressure from the neck strap. While out hunting, I often hold onto the neck strap when galloping as it steadies both me and him without the need to touch the reins.
                                      That's a really good point. I'd be pleased to have one more bit of equipment (and training) that would help me stop a rank horse.

                                      But I didn't always think so!

                                      In high school, I *would not* use a neck strap on a big, strong KWPN gelding I evented..... in a PdN for the XC, even after the HO roached the mane. Nosirreebob. Vanity prevented it. I'm glad I survived.
                                      The armchair saddler
                                      Politically Pro-Cat

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                                      • #79
                                        Bucking straps can be EXTREMELY useful to help riders find and steady their cores. Works like nothing else. Once you've had that feeling, it can be replicated without the strap.

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Originally posted by Vesper Sparrow View Post
                                          I see Bit of Britain also carries them in a cheaper nylon version.
                                          Rope burn.

                                          During "Oh, man, that's gonna hurt" moments when I'm coming off, I don't want to add nylon-on-skin to that. I'd pay more to avoid that.
                                          The armchair saddler
                                          Politically Pro-Cat

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