• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Riders that are "all hat and no cattle"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Get down on a cow is cutting. Not roping.

    Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
    I never said sorting.

    I said "get down on a cow" ropes them but its good to work cattle in general... Google roping you see plenty of tie downs. "hence me saying he needed his spare hand" as he is not sorting and wouldnt care.

    Ive sorted cattle plenty. I know you think dressage is filled with people who never saw a horn but Ive seen plenty
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte

    Comment


    • #22
      This is a dressage thread. "Sorting" cattle can be done easily using the extended jog-trot .

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by BaroquePony View Post
        This is a dressage thread. "Sorting" cattle can be done easily using the extended jog-trot .
        Or even a walk serpentine.
        "Aye God, Woodrow..."

        Comment


        • #24
          He was practicing moving a cow around (rolling it back on the wall). Ropers do all kinds of cow work and dont JUST chase that one cow running across the arena and put up the spurs and go home. Sorry he didnt put on his "sorting" gear.

          You cant say anything on coth without it turning into "I know more about cows than you because you ride dressage" thread.
          ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
          http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #25
            Thanks for the clarification, MistyBlue!

            I never "got down on a cow" competitively. What experience I have was cattle work on the ranch: gathering, "mothering up", sorting calves from cows and heifers from steers, that sort of thing. Did my share of vaccinating, ear-notching, branding, de-horning and dipping. In the fall, we'd drive the herd to the winter pasture down highway 194 -- with a police escort for and aft of the bunch!

            I never roped, never wanted to. I left that to Cousin Henry and Ray, our hired guy. They were good. Henry only had one good arm. His left shoulder had been injured in a fall and never cared for right. He'd hold his reins in his bad hand and rope with his good right arm. One of the coolest things I ever witnessed was him pelting after a loose calf, swinging that rope and making the prettiest catch ever. In the open. He was about 77 years old then, and just showing signs of the Parkinson's disease that would kill him a few years later.

            He had the hat AND the cattle!

            Oh, and no tie-downs on our working horses. That's for those arena ropers.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post

              Ive sorted cattle plenty. I know you think dressage is filled with people who never saw a horn but Ive seen plenty
              Don't we all need to see more horn.

              Comment


              • #27
                To make a generalization: a lot of "gamers" around here think they are cowgirls (the stickers on their trucks say so) b/c they wear spurs & can yank their poor horse around a barrel. I am fairly sure no cows have been involved, at any time. Most of them haven't even cleaned their own stall.

                (yes, not every barrel racer is a yahoo, etc etc)

                I ride dressage. I have never sorted cows on horseback. I would love to, though. I want my horse to have a wider world view.

                I was, however, Little International Champion Livestock Showman (1994). I fit a mean Angus.
                Last edited by Hippolyta; Jan. 7, 2013, 01:57 AM.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by BaroquePony View Post
                  Well, I guess the cows arrived and spoiled the party .
                  Is that like waiting 'til the cows come home? ;-)

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    I guess in Dressage the expression would be:
                    " All top-hat and no canter "
                    My horse is a "Hare-Brained Controvert".

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      All this talk of "seeing more horn" and "getting down on a cow" has me all frustarized (says the southern belle fanning herself).

                      Are the golfers who are all bag and no club? Or swimmers who are all flippers and no pool? What is it with horse people? My husband who has been watching us for over 30 years is convinced they are all crazy. I tend to agree. Except me of course......
                      Groom to trainer: "Where's the glamour? You promised me glamour!"

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
                        You cant say anything on coth without it turning into "I know more about cows than you because you ride dressage" thread.
                        Sorry Nomi, but taken on its own this is the best COTH sulk ever!!

                        It really deserves to be adopted in someone's sig line!
                        Proud COTH lurker since 2001.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post

                          I never roped, never wanted to. I left that to Cousin Henry and Ray, our hired guy. They were good. Henry only had one good arm. His left shoulder had been injured in a fall and never cared for right. He'd hold his reins in his bad hand and rope with his good right arm. One of the coolest things I ever witnessed was him pelting after a loose calf, swinging that rope and making the prettiest catch ever. In the open. He was about 77 years old then, and just showing signs of the Parkinson's disease that would kill him a few years later.

                          He had the hat AND the cattle!

                          Oh, and no tie-downs on our working horses. That's for those arena ropers.
                          It is a thing of beauty to watch someone who really knows how to ride and rope do their thing. Arena roping I don't care for. Just a personal thing, but I like cattle too much to enjoy seeing them jerked around for no particular reason.

                          I have a hat and we have cattle. However, it's a small operation and when I work cattle, it's on foot. Based on what I've seen, a lot of people would benefit from getting off their horses and learning how to move cattle that way. You make a lot fewer mistakes when YOU'RE the one who has to run, not the horse.
                          __________________________
                          "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
                          the best day in ten years,
                          you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Originally posted by Lost_at_C View Post
                            So well said, Gestalt!

                            In the interest of "kicking on", I also fondly recall the example of an acquaintance of mine who posted a photograph of her and her mare on Facebook.... mare was in the up-phase of the canter stride and she - quite seriously - captioned the photo, "a beautiful canter pirouette, such a good girl". This was a 2nd level competitor. It was fun to watch.
                            ROFLOL. I have a very nice picture of my now deceased 2nd/3rd level horse. It was during a clinic and we were doing simple changes on a serpentine. The photographer caught us just as he was ABOUT to canter from the walk and it truly looks like piaffe. Not a really elevated one - but it's just that one moment and he WAS lifting his forehand for the depart, and lifting a hind leg for that first step. I just don't say anything when I show people the picture and a lot of them have been impressed with my horse's "beginning piaffe!" I then tell the truth (darn!) *G*

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
                              I helped a cowboy today with his horse. He is practicing "getting down" on a cow right now and I explained that his horse doesnt really stay soft in the bridle (tie down and big shank bit of course).

                              ...
                              It can be fun to be open minded enough to help eachother out
                              And very USEFUL to be open-minded enough to LEARN from others, in other disciplines!

                              Carol
                              www.ayliprod.com
                              Equine Photography in the Northeast

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by CHSatwork View Post
                                I'd love to know what you meant by the tie down and shank bit of course. I run the RSNC in VA. I ran the 2 day state finals last weekend. We had classes up to 200 teams. There was not a horse in a shanked bit or tie down. Sorters use plain O ring snaffles and NO tie downs, EVER. I'd love to know where you get that they use shanks and tie downs "of course".

                                ETA: We had teams from all over the east coast. As far as Long Island, NJ and on down to GA
                                Not sure what RSNC is, but I'm thinking NOMI's person might have been working on cutting or working cowhorse? In which case, MOST are ridden with curb bits (which, by definition and function, have shanks) - and sometimes, a tie-down.

                                C
                                www.ayliprod.com
                                Equine Photography in the Northeast

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by SanJacMonument View Post
                                  Don't we all need to see more horn.
                                  LOL To be sure :0

                                  Originally posted by Lost_at_C View Post
                                  Sorry Nomi, but taken on its own this is the best COTH sulk ever!!

                                  It really deserves to be adopted in someone's sig line!
                                  Lost, I wont argue there! Im in a western mecca and constantly explained how THEY do it in in western when my last show with a horn was only a year ago!

                                  If Im in my tall boots I MUST have no clue what all these cow ponies do and whats that again? A latigo? LOL

                                  Clearly a bit sulky about it by now (four years) lol.

                                  THis was an arena roper NO DOUBT. But he was wanting to work on rolling back a cow on the fence and I said um yeah with your horse head in your face it might be difficult. I just walked up and did some flexions from the ground and told him how to be softer with his hand a bit and voila better roll back. But yes I did mention to him using a snaffle when doing that work vs just roping would be better. I even said his "position" coulsd use some work Maybe next Ill offer lunge lessons
                                  ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
                                  http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Nomi, showing someone how to be softer is great, but curb bits are not about lateral flexion. At all. They are for longitudinal flexion, aka collection. Even in western work.

                                    If you show the guy any more lateral stuff, get him in a snaffle before you do. Curb bits are not meant for working off the sides of the mouth.

                                    But then you know that, right?
                                    __________________________
                                    "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
                                    the best day in ten years,
                                    you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      But I have to say curb bite are overused they days for horses and riders that arent meant for them.

                                      I do gymkhana on my English hunter/jumper/dressage pony and I totally recommend it. We haven't gotten in to anything else yet, but I originally stared doing gymkhana to have him go to shows and know that's it was *just for fun*, except my horse is a serious athlete brain and treats it seriously. Oh well. I don't let him go balls out, we work on bending, straightness and overall our communication at a trot and canter. My friend who IS a barrel racer took him in one class, promptly (accidentally) kicked my uber-sensitive ottb and blew the freaking hats off everyone who competed that day. He would have gotten a better score if he hadn't gone YAHOO and launched himself into the air, bucking twice. LOL. Because I always work quietly and slowly with him, the arena got quiet after his run.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by mp View Post
                                        Nomi, showing someone how to be softer is great, but curb bits are not about lateral flexion. At all. They are for longitudinal flexion, aka collection. Even in western work.

                                        If you show the guy any more lateral stuff, get him in a snaffle before you do. Curb bits are not meant for working off the sides of the mouth.

                                        But then you know that, right?
                                        Well yeah this was a shank bit with a broken mouth piece and not a curb. I actually could "kinda" get a bit of flexion in the poll standing there but Ive had practice enough to really give the hand quick. THe guy just took "softer hands" to mean dont jerk real hard.

                                        Baby steps...

                                        It wasnt really a lesson so I was just trying to save the horse in about 10 minutes of discussion
                                        ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
                                        http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Did he ask you for help?

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X