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SEZUAN new RECORD

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  • #21
    Is it just me or did he look kind of heavy in the bridle?

    Christ, everyone's a critic. LOL.
    Help me keep my horse in peppermints and enjoy a great read! My New York City crime novel, available on Amazon.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by CFFarm View Post
      Looks a lot like a saddlebred canter but I've been thinking for years that was the direction the euro breeders were heading.
      Saddlebreds were 'designed' as a flashy plantation horse, and the minds eye was a dressage horse. These newer warm bloods are imitating what once was made to imitate them.
      Oh the irony.
      I like his canter, but I also love a good saddlebred... At least they are a comfortable ride!
      www.destinationconsensusequus.com
      chaque pas est fait ensemble

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      • #23
        Originally posted by staceyk View Post
        How common is it for a horse's paternity to be called into question (in this case he was found to be by a different sire than originally thought!)?
        I don't know how common it is, but the eurodressage story says it was a record-keeping error.


        Legs are moving -- must be a leg mover.

        Too bad about the miserable canter and the crappy riders.

        Comment


        • #24
          Maybe his hocks look funny to some people because they're actually bent and moving under him.


          As to ideayoda's question - without knowing for sure if OCD is a heritable trait, I probably wouldn't breed to him if he were a horse I was considering in the first place. The actual reason I wouldn't breed to him is, well, I wouldn't want to ride him. You'd certainly get to see his natural gaits as I would be the monkey trying to stay on up there, but it wouldn't do him any good!

          I could criticize how he looks being ridden, but in the end he's a very young, very green in dressage terms and very powerful and big-moving horse. I've never ridden a horse like that and I have no idea how easily they overpower themselves to get their necks too bent/get themselves a little too reliant on support from the rein. I just find it a pleasure to watch an over-hyped horse whose hocks are under him instead of dragging out behind. I could do without overly fancy front ends and prefer the ones which get flashy from correct work and training, still matching up with the back end, but I think I like to watch Zack babies in general - he seems to pass along an engine which works better than lots.
          Originally posted by Silverbridge
          If you get anything on your Facebook feed about who is going to the Olympics in 2012 or guessing the outcome of Bush v Gore please start threads about those, too.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
            Saddlebreds were 'designed' as a flashy plantation horse, and the minds eye was a dressage horse. These newer warm bloods are imitating what once was made to imitate them.
            Oh the irony.
            I like his canter, but I also love a good saddlebred... At least they are a comfortable ride!
            Incorrect. Dressage horses (in the modern sense) did not exist when the Saddlebred was created (first Saddlebred shows were before the American Civil War and the studbook was organized in 1891, competitive dressage was not even a sport yet). The warmbloods were heavy harness horses when the Saddlebred was being created as the ultimate saddle horse.

            Some comparisons:

            Saddlebred stallion Golden Thunderbolt foaled 1948 http://pets.webshots.com/photo/23186...94062045LkhEav

            Gelderlander stallion Odin van Wittenstein foaled 1950 http://home.earthlink.net/~kingslane...ittenstein.jpg

            Saddlebred stallion CH King's Genius foaled 1924 http://pets.webshots.com/photo/26668...94062045RbFdvR

            Oldenburg stallion Gambo foaled 1927 http://www.sporthorse-data.com/horse..._Gambo-big.jpg

            Sorry for the diversion from topic, just had to set the record straight

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            • Original Poster

              #26
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mz3d_UCphZ4

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              • #27
                Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
                Does anyone else think that these young horses judges should be encouraging a more practical type movement?
                Why, when the vast majority of horses already fit this category? These elite riders are obviously looking for a different sort of ride.


                Thanks for posting this link. I remembered it from another thread about this horse several months ago.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by netg View Post
                  Maybe his hocks look funny to some people because they're actually bent and moving under him.
                  I agree with whoever said he has something a 'bit extra' going on--hard to say what exactly--but this is a very young horse. I do not care for 'pointy hocks" never mind OCDs. He's just a little too tall for my taste (not that he wont appeal to others)--I just dont find the overly tall super extravagant movers to last as well. Not for me.
                  Redbud Ranch
                  Check us out on FB

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                  • #29
                    I felt that Valegro as a young horse was more practical, so my comment was not to imply an "average" mover was better.
                    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
                    http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

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                    • #30
                      Renae, you're right, I didn't communicate clearly what I was trying to get across. Saddlebreds were modeled after dressage horses, with their movement imbellished upon. You can't argue that no one was riding Hanos built like your example. Now modern dressage horses look like they are taking after saddlebreds with imbellished gaits.
                      Last edited by Petstorejunkie; Nov. 12, 2012, 01:49 PM.
                      www.destinationconsensusequus.com
                      chaque pas est fait ensemble

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                      • #31
                        Petstorejumky you are still wrong. The original qualifying feature that got a horse into the Saddlebred studbook was that it could perform the saddle gaits (the slow gait and rack) in addition to the standard 3 gaits. Gaited horses had long been abandoned in Europe. I'm not sure where you are getting the idea that the Saddlebred, developed in the 1800's, was modeled after anything from continental Europe. The English Thoroughbred was crossed on the native American mare stock that, regional types of gaited horses descended from Scottish Galloways, Irish Hobbies and Spanish Jennetts.

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                        • #32
                          Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
                          I felt that Valegro as a young horse was more practical, so my comment was not to imply an "average" mover was better.
                          Practical, hopefully Grand Prix potential. Nope, does not compute.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I felt that Valegro as a young horse was more practical, so my comment was not to imply an "average" mover was better.
                            Just a thought - 10 years ago GP horses moved nothing like the totilas and valegros we see nowadays. Maybe 10 years from now these amazing horses we talk about now will be just above average?

                            I agree most of the young horse stars fade out because they are unable to reach GP, but still, I think this has to be the way to go - breed sound horses with good brains and as over the top gaits as possible.
                            www.facebook.com/lusitanos4sale

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                            • #34
                              Originally posted by Twisted River View Post
                              I think he's beautiful and would love to ride such a powerful horse - so long as I don't have to sit his trot!

                              For Spectrum and anyone else interested in his conformation: HERE is a link to his stallion listing with a conformation picture. They took his picture at a bit more angle than I would prefer. For another shot of Sezuan's conformation, pause THIS youtube video at 1:39/1:40. "Wonky" is not the word I would use to describe him
                              The angle of his conformation picture covers up that he's a little bit downhill. The angle of the picture has his fore legs higher than his back.

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                              • #35
                                A lot of good horses are downhill until they move.
                                ... _. ._ .._. .._

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                                • #36
                                  I'm not sure I believe his conformation is downhill anyway. Especially given the withers/hips don't mean much in the first place.
                                  Originally posted by Silverbridge
                                  If you get anything on your Facebook feed about who is going to the Olympics in 2012 or guessing the outcome of Bush v Gore please start threads about those, too.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    He's three for christ sake why would you expect him to be level?

                                    Even a non dressage person with a half decent eye can see an extravagant mover who is THREE and doesn't have enough physical strength yet to carry himself under saddle yet

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      I didn't like his canter the first time I saw it and I still don't like it. While it is extravagant, I think it is too big for collection.

                                      So, he might be succesful in the FEI young horse classes, but I'm not sure we will see him at the GP level in CDIs.

                                      And with this OCD I would NEVER breed to him. Breeding is already a gamble but if the parents have known problems, forget about it!

                                      He is pretty and has a cool trot and huge walk ...

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                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by volvo_240 View Post
                                        He's three for christ sake why would you expect him to be level?

                                        Even a non dressage person with a half decent eye can see an extravagant mover who is THREE and doesn't have enough physical strength yet to carry himself under saddle yet
                                        Oh gawd here we go....there were several comments earlier in this thread about his conformation and that is specifically what my comment referred to.

                                        A horse may or may not be level at three, and that's irrelevant. But this horse, at the time the picture was taken appears to be built downhill-ish. Did I say he's not an extravagant mover? Did I say he doesn't move uphill?

                                        And for what it's worth - I'm a dressage person with an awfully good eye and I can tell you that the three year old in the videos carries himself better than the 11 year old mare that I adore. So it's all relative isn't it?

                                        So Volvo don't freak out. He's not built very uphill at this point in his life. Your life will continue tomorrow and everything will be okay.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          I'm not freaking out , just think it's a silly thing to debate about a 3 year old. I wasn't reacting to your comment specifically.

                                          And 'proper' wasn't quite the correct word choice - what I meant is that's clear his strength hasn't caught up to his natural ability ( to be expected for his age)

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