• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Dressage makes a horse more confident?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dressage makes a horse more confident?

    Has dressage made your horse more confident? It certainly has for my mustang - he's actually gotten a bit full of himself and cocky. It's like he thinks he's All That - especially around the ladies. I think he finds confidence from the strength in agility in his body and his increased athleticism.

    How about your horse - has dressage changed his or her 'tude?
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran

  • #2
    With all due respect, I think your assessment is a bit anthropological.

    I'm glad your horse is doing well, but I've never seen a horse become cocky with other horses in their herd because of their development in the riding school. Two different worlds, IME. And surely is not gender related.

    Glad to know you are liking your horses' attitude. But I doubt it has much about the riding discipline. He may just may be feeling better because he's a bit more "muscled up" and is more fit, that can be achieved in any riding disciple.
    www.littlebullrun@aol.com See Little Bull Run's stallions at:
    "Argosy" - YouTube and "Boleem" - YouTube
    Boleem @ 1993 National Dressage Symposium - YouTube

    Comment


    • #3
      It may or may not be anthropomorphism. I know that dogs get more confident as they learn things -it's actually suggested for very submissive dogs -so why not horses. It may not be dressage in particular, but training in general.

      Paula
      He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

      Comment


      • #4
        I've found that dressage has helped my young mare immensely. I think it has increased her confidence because it gives her something to focus on.


        If she is tense, I turn to a particular exercise, perhaps a 20m stretchy circle, or a leg yield or some other thing to keep her mind busy. As soon as she realizes "oh, we are doing *that* pattern", she relaxes and goes back to her normal self.

        This has carried over into our jumping where she is much easier to rate between jumps which gives us a smoother trip.

        Comment


        • #5
          Of course it effects it all to a degree. They are more fit and their body is able to "sustain" longer and those things effect placement in the herd. My horse in the teens is fitter this winter than last and she plays harder more tail up running which of course tells her buddies dont mess with this! lol

          After a good ride and you are walking them back to the stall they usually have that power walk going like they could go another round.

          I think it also helps them feel that you are their partner more and they are brave to obsticals and situations. Less insecure of their own seperation from their buddies.

          You really can require a new form of supple and obedience and keep control with the larger burst of energy needed with the forward movements. I think that knowledge really leaves and impression on them that is ever lasting. They can GO without losing their relaxation and attention.

          Its a hugely ideal to notice these things IMO
          ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
          http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            I know dressage helps my horses. My mare is a great example of an ok horse becoming a very good horse. Dressage taught her balance and coordination. Being worked correctly did wonders for her body and soul. I think that no matter your discipline of choice, dressage can't hurt your horse.

            Comment


            • #7
              Definately makes them more confident, and especially if you use them over varied terrain.

              It also makes them far more athletic

              Comment


              • #8
                yes, it makes them more confident, happy and they really get into the work..... just like someone who works out hard and feels good afterwards - no anthropomorphizing needed

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes! My horse is still learning the very basic. He was a trail horse. He has a much more clear idea of what is expected of him and knows when he does it correctly. No more wondering what I am asking him to do. Maybe it is just good training in general but I think that dressage helps control all of him, not just steering him around. It also is handy when we do trail ride and encounter something he may be unsure of. I just ask him for something from a lesson and he forgets what he was worried about. I also have noticed that what I am learning carries over to more than just when we have a lesson. I have noticed that I am riding better in all situations. I am really enjoying it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I dunno---I have had a number of foals born very confident, fearless and independent. I have even had a few that would be considered "bold'. The two Im thinking of were naturally athletic and very well balanced both physically and mentally---but each had that something a bit 'extra' in terms of "happy in their own skins" and 'user friendly"--in otherwords I think the were born "confident". Ive had others that were less naturally confident (not really shy or nervous) but not naturally bold or outgoing by nature. They were more the "follower" types---easy to work with but gained confidence and poise through consistent handling and training---these ones also happened to take longer to become physically and mentally mature. So in a way training seems to build on the innate personality traits and character of the horse---provided it doesn't diminish in confidence through mishandling/training or management.

                    I have one guy that is just quirky--it is who he is. He can be a very cool customer or 'clown' depending on how the mood strikes him. He was definitely not one of the "confident" youngsters---instead, he was one that always looked to his human for direction.
                    Redbud Ranch
                    Check us out on FB

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      interesting... maybe we are talking about different "things" ... when i say "confident" i dont mean like how bold they are ... i mean how they use their body - ummmm..... i think the best analogy i can think of is the difference in how i feel from when i work out a lot and have more of a connection with my body and when i dont. physically i am more confident when i am working out...

                      i dont think i am making sense! lol!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well I agree horses do change as they grow more 'fit' and more "trained" they become more energetic and exuberant and more able to respond correctly and with consistency---but when I think of "confidence" its more in terms of interior character and personality. I have known horses (and bred them) that posses an internal calmness and noble presence---they are born "confident" and are 'comfortable in their own skins" --- in a weird way they seem to possess a kind of unique "Purposefullness' to their being. Now I am not making since-hahahaha.
                        Redbud Ranch
                        Check us out on FB

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fella went from a tulip to a daisy. He went from a quiet, beautiful tulip to

                          "HELLO look at me I'm a DAISY!"


                          Paula
                          He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mbm View Post
                            interesting... maybe we are talking about different "things" ... when i say "confident" i dont mean like how bold they are ... i mean how they use their body - ummmm..... i think the best analogy i can think of is the difference in how i feel from when i work out a lot and have more of a connection with my body and when i dont. physically i am more confident when i am working out...

                            i dont think i am making sense! lol!
                            Makes sense to me.
                            www.littlebullrun@aol.com See Little Bull Run's stallions at:
                            "Argosy" - YouTube and "Boleem" - YouTube
                            Boleem @ 1993 National Dressage Symposium - YouTube

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My horse went from confident to "if I had opposable thumbs, I could TAKE OVER THE WORLD!"
                              __________________________
                              "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
                              the best day in ten years,
                              you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                My horse was born confident. But he seemed to change from "I'm awesome so I don't really care too much what you think" confident to "It's fun doing dressage together so I can show off how awesome I am" confident.
                                Donald Trump - proven liar, cheat, traitor and sexual predator! Hillary Clinton won in 2016, but we have all lost.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by psb View Post
                                  Yes! My horse is still learning the very basic. He was a trail horse. He has a much more clear idea of what is expected of him and knows when he does it correctly. No more wondering what I am asking him to do. Maybe it is just good training in general but I think that dressage helps control all of him, not just steering him around. It also is handy when we do trail ride and encounter something he may be unsure of. I just ask him for something from a lesson and he forgets what he was worried about. I also have noticed that what I am learning carries over to more than just when we have a lesson. I have noticed that I am riding better in all situations. I am really enjoying it.
                                  This is exactly the same with my guy...right down to the former trail-horse-only occupation. He used to be a spooky, "OMG what is THAT?!" sort of horse. Now, he still has a spooky side, but he focuses on me alot easier and quicker. He also has seemed to relish the more frequent work and attention. I love the changes dressage has made in him.
                                  The only thing the government needs to solve all of its problems is a Council of Common Sense.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Of Course!!! The same thing happens to humans too. A strong, fit human is more confident than a weak, unfit human. As they build their strength, they develop self assurance and confidence, just like all humans do; and, all the endorphin release from correct workouts does not hurt either. I know my horse is getting bigger an attitude since we started riding dressage seriously. He used to think he was a good old boy; now he thinks he is a stud, in a very good way, .

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by sid View Post
                                      With all due respect, I think your assessment is a bit anthropological.
                                      With all due respect, you use that word and I do not think it means what you think it means.


                                      I do think there's some anthropomorphism involved in how we interpret it, but I think mbm's idea is also accurate.

                                      My horse looks much more confident to me from a human perspective in that now when he's doing his "show off for the new girl" prance instead of being hollow and tail up in the air at a somewhat uncoordinated full gallop he alternates between extended trot, collected trot, shoulder in and renvers. It looks far more impressive to me as his human, seeing how VERY uphill he gets playing on his own.

                                      He also seems more confident to me from a human perspective in that he used to freak out if other horses were worked up at all, but now he pretty much ignores the hissy fits the girls throw when I take him out to work. Sunset, blowing garbage, live bands playing at the short end of the arena, cattle being roped up the hill - all are things which used to cause meltdowns, but now in his barely worked stage as I'm recovering from an injury he simply accepts me telling him it's not something to worry about and goes on his way, aware of things happening but not concerned.

                                      So if you want to apply a human term to it, he's more confident, and more confident *in me*. In a horse term, he doesn't feel threatened and believes predators to be kept at bay, and understands what expectations are.
                                      Originally posted by Silverbridge
                                      If you get anything on your Facebook feed about who is going to the Olympics in 2012 or guessing the outcome of Bush v Gore please start threads about those, too.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post

                                        After a good ride and you are walking them back to the stall they usually have that power walk going like they could go another round.
                                        I definitely notice that power walk at the end of the ride. Not sure if it has something to do with the horse knowing there's gonna be carrots when he gets to the stall, though
                                        Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that to be a problem.

                                        Originally posted by DottieHQ
                                        You're just jealous because you lack my extensive koalafications.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X