• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Ready to cry! Please help with my horse.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ready to cry! Please help with my horse.

    I just spent 45 mins trying to get my horse to walk calmly in a circle and am at a complete loss as to what to do!

    Back story:
    I have owned her for 4 years and we never had a perfect connection or anything and she has always been a little spooky and hot, but it's no uncontrollable.
    I had her leased out to a girl who was running her barrels with her (what she was originally doing when I bought her and what I was doing with her for a little while) well apparently, she got on the mare and ran her to the ground because my horse came back a bigger spazz than she had ever been! Her brain is so fried that she can't even walk in a circle on the aids calmly and I can't for the life of me figure out what to do! I took her to my trainers and she wasnt horrible, but we still didnt get anywhere with her. Today she would not settle at all and I dont know if I should just start over like I am training a horse who has never been ridden and start with lunging or what....

    Please help!

  • #2
    You need to give her some time off. Most horses with fried brains don't sort themselves out during training. Leave her alone for a month, then re-assess. She may need more time than that.

    Comment


    • #3
      I feel your frustration. I'd say this; first rule out any physical issues. Then, barring that, get a better trainer, someone who's rehabbed horses with issues perhaps (not a beat them type, a patient, reprogramming type), and then have patience. If it is that her brain is fried she'll need time and patience.

      Paula
      He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

      Comment


      • #4
        Take her out of the ring and do something completely different. Do not insist on controlling her every step. Try changing her mouth gear. Maybe a hackamore instead of a bit.

        Overall, ask for different things. Use different equipment. Follow the old adage of 'Ride where you can ride.' Do not stay in the same place failing to accomplish your goal.

        If you feel the mare has been overly pressured, then stop pressuring her.
        "Friend" me !

        http://www.facebook.com/isabeau.solace

        Comment


        • #5
          Everyone's right....BTDT and all you can do is rule out any physical issues, time off, and find a trainer experienced in handling problem horses. I actually worked with a Natural Horsemanship trainer (local trainer with good references rather than one of the crazies) who had worked with me and my mare before. We did a couple of months of ground work before even thinking about getting on her. I also took lessons on a quiet schoolie which helped rebuild my confidence - keep in mind your brain is probably fried too!

          Good luck!
          "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
          "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

          Comment


          • #6
            Give her some time off of riding. Let her be a horse. Once you decide to get back on, ride outside with her and let her walk around where she wants to go. Then, slowly ease back into more structured riding. Letting her wander around outside wher she wants to go while you're riding her in the future (even after getting back to structured riding) isn't going to hurt.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              She has had 3 months off and is regularly seen by a chiro. I guess I will start with ground work. If I get too stuck, I am super lucky and have one of the worlds best natural horsemanship guys down the road from me Josh and John lyons opened a facility about 3 miles from me a few years ago.

              Comment


              • #8
                I would stop the lease.

                Who in their right mind think that it is good to ran barrels like a crazy with a mare who is, apparently, just coming back to work after 3 months off?!?

                I think you should have her checked by a vet, she's probably muscle sore everywhere! Also, your mare could have an ulcer or suffer from a mild tying up crisis.
                ~ Enjoying some guac and boxed wine at the Blue Saddle inn. ~

                Originally posted by LauraKY
                I'm sorry, but this has "eau de hoarder" smell all over it.
                HORSING mobile training app

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by alibi_18 View Post
                  I would stop the lease.

                  Who in their right mind think that it is good to ran barrels like a crazy with a mare who is, apparently, just coming back to work after 3 months off?!?

                  I think you should have her checked by a vet, she's probably muscle sore everywhere! Also, your mare could have an ulcer or suffer from a mild tying up crisis.
                  Clearly you didnt understand. I have had her back for 3 months now. She is now coming back to work after being checked out and is now unmanageable. She was in perfect shape when I sent her off.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If she walks 2 or 3 steps, get off and call it a day. Do this every time you ride until she relaxes and you can walk forward. We have done this with very fried horses and they slowly realize we aren't trying to kill them,

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ready To Riot View Post
                      She has had 3 months off and is regularly seen by a chiro. I guess I will start with ground work. If I get too stuck, I am super lucky and have one of the worlds best natural horsemanship guys down the road from me Josh and John lyons opened a facility about 3 miles from me a few years ago.
                      This board is not very open to natural horsemanship, but I think this is actually a very good idea. Especially if you can get them to work with both of you (you and the horse) together. They'll give you a program to get control of her mind then her body on the ground. Then when you go back to riding her, hopefully things will come together for you.

                      I'm sorry this happened to you, and I hope it works out.
                      I have a Fjord! Life With Oden

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A Thought

                        Coming from background of seeing badly ridden barrel horses, I would suspect the major problem is the expecting any kind of contact. Those riders are not good with their hands, and I would suspect, although this is just suspicion, that who ever was riding her was hanging on her mouth while she was expected to run causing anxiety.

                        If she can't even walk calmly, I would maybe make my "rides" getting on sitting there while she stands quietly and repeating that a few times with no motion involved.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had one of those in my barn; nervous former barrel horse mare that is!

                          She also didn't know how to walk.

                          What we did to fix;
                          1) Changed her tack completely. English saddle, simple egg butt snaffle, and no tie down/martingale.
                          2) Put a super relaxed kid on her.
                          3) Forgot about really trying to do anything in particular, and just worked on getting horse to be "happy". really helped to have contact on her (leg contact in particular) as if she could feel the hands/legs she wasn't laying in wait of a jerk or a kick. We would scratch her along her crest of withers whenever possible to get her to stretch out her neck.
                          4) rode her beside/with a horse of similar speed, but that was relaxed, and just went around the ring with the occassional circle or figure 8. Very low key and really didn't fuss if she broke into a canter, just asked her back and continued along. Trails were good too.

                          One thing I didn't do though, was expect her to walk quietly at the beginning of the ride. She was just too tense. We let her offer the quiet walk when she could.
                          Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes!!!

                            If you have John Lyons down the road, you are a lucky girl . You cannot do any better. Call today. There are many, many barrel horses who have this happen because the riders do not know how to keep them sane.

                            pKN

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Agree with John Lyons.

                              I would also just do quiet trail riding with no pressure until you can get her to John Lyons.
                              Born under a rock and owned by beasts!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I think the Dressage Forum is actually the wrong place to look for the help your mare needs...and to be honest it sounds like she has been a Barel Horse before and after...so even now w/ 3 months behind you it maybe dificult to make a leopard change its spots and forget a long ingrained pattern....more like a year off than start from ground zero in a completley diffrent enviorment, approach, tack as suggested.

                                Did this horse have a calm solid loose rein flat footed walk to begin with or has she always beena bit of go go hottie as I believe you said??

                                I have owned her for 4 years and we never had a perfect connection or anything and she has always been a little spooky and hot, but it's no uncontrollable.
                                I had her leased out to a girl who was running her barrels with her (what she was originally doing when I bought her and what I was doing with her for a little while

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  She is a hotter horse, but managable. When I was riding her, she was at 2nd level dressage as well as running barrels. She will never be a beginners horse, but she was very rideable. I dont think a year off would do her any good. The more time off she has the worse she gets. She is a horse who needs a job

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I have rehabbed lots of horses from similar problems. Here is the program I use:
                                    1) Vet out for basic exam and to check teeth. If all clear...
                                    2) Turn out for a week and only visit in pasture for treats and love
                                    3) Begin at the very beginning...work on relaxed head lowered leading in the pasture. Don't leave until he calmly leads with a lowered head. I also teach a "relax" cue at the same time that means "lower your head". This is used as a verbal cue to make him lower his head on cue which immediately calms a nervous horse. I then use this all throughout our ground and under saddle training to relax and calm him.
                                    4) Move to leading towards and in barb with a lowered head. Don't go a step farther without relaxation.
                                    5) retrain all grooming so you now have a horse that can be quietly lead in with no nervousness and will stand quietly without a single fuss for grooming.
                                    6) Begin lunging. The key is CALM. No running, bucking, bolting, etc. If he can't maintain emotional control on the lunge he can't control it with a rider. Start with walk only. Micing off voice cue and maintaining a quiet willing trot. Slowing down on verbal cue. Repeat with trot and canter only when each gait is 100% quiet, no rushing/head tossing/bucking etc. Do all lunging in just a halter with no tack. When lunging is calm, focused and steady through all 3 gaits move to step 7.
                                    7) Call saddle fitter. No tack goes on him without a professional fitter to assess. If all is cleared move forward. If not, get the issue fixed.
                                    8) So now we have a calm and quiet horse who leads, grooms and lunges with zero anxiety or resistance. Your tack has been professionally checked and a
                                    vet has checked it all out.
                                    8) Begin backing as if he is unbroke. This is a complete reboot. Treat him exactly as an unbroke 3 year old. Use your voice commands to slow him and ask him to relax his head if he gets nervous. Use only verbal cues and a ground assistant if needed until he responds 100%.
                                    9) If all went well you should have a different horse at this time!! And having John Lyons nearby is awesome! Utilize him if you can!!

                                    These are obviously just suggestions but this program has worked insanely well for me on many horses! One is just finishing it up right now! Best of luck and be patient, consistent and kind. The rest should just follow!!
                                    Please excuse the typos...I'm always on my iPhone and autocorrect is not my friend. Yes I mean mares autocorrect...not mates.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Assuming she gets turnout and very little grain....

                                      Originally posted by reay6790 View Post
                                      If she walks 2 or 3 steps, get off and call it a day. Do this every time you ride until she relaxes and you can walk forward. We have done this with very fried horses and they slowly realize we aren't trying to kill them,
                                      This.

                                      Don't insist that she MUST do something she clearly is not ready to do. Arguing about it will only make it worse.

                                      Is there something she can do reasonably well? Trot calmly accepting(not necessarily on) the bit? So trot, posting big, sit and say walk, walk as many steps as she will walk calmly than trot on before she starts to get anxious.

                                      FWIW the nice elegant hunter pat pat post will not regulate the tempo nearly as well as a definite UP DOWN with soft eyes and seatbones landing in the saddle pointing down
                                      I wasn't always a Smurf
                                      Penmerryl Sophie RIDSH
                                      "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                                      The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Forget about tryng to get a hyped up horse to walk. Does she just try to run if you try to trot? Do you have access to trails?

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X