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Workouts for your core :) Gimme your best ones!

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  • Workouts for your core :) Gimme your best ones!

    I started Ab Attack again on my netflix by "Crunch" workout routines. Tons of squats, abs, and um squats

    I love it for core workouts...

    I'd like to know of some more... Something I can order online or get on netflix would be great!
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
    http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    pilates: plank, sideplank, 100's.
    "I'm holding out for the $100,000 Crossrail Classic in 2012." --mem
    "With all due respect.. may I suggest you take up Croquet?" --belambi
    Proud Member of the Opinionated Redhead Club!

    Comment


    • #3
      Exercise TV Yoga Slims (48 mins)
      Exercise TV Yoga for Abs with Tom Whorley (11 mins)
      Bryan Kest Yoga 2-3
      (These being that flavor of yoga that leaves me shaky and drooling focus on yogi bicycles, plank on one arm, awkward chair, leg extended DD crunches)
      Pilates
      Kettle Bells
      Last edited by trabern; Jan. 24, 2012, 12:01 PM. Reason: ETA: All these avail on Apple TV or netflix or online
      At all times, we are either training or untraining.
      Flying Haflinger blog: http://flyinghaflinger.blogspot.com/ Flying Irish Draught blog: http://flyingirishredhead.blogspot.com/

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by BetterOffRed View Post
        pilates: plank, sideplank, 100's.
        In ab attack they do planks too!
        ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
        http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          I love the P90x ab ripper and legs adn back. I saw a huge difference in my riding ability when I did P90x and focused on legs and back work out and ab ripper.

          I also like Insanity. There is a lot of core work in that video series and you get the cardio with the core workout.

          Comment


          • #6
            There are two "10-minute Solutions" Pilates videos on Netflix streaming. They're great because you can change up the routines to just focus on abs, upper or lower body, or a 10-minute allover workout if you're pressed for time.

            Comment


            • #7
              These are all good examples, just wanted to add: don't neglect your back. I learned the hard way that abs aren't everything, and its very easy to become unbalanced if you don't focus on both. I feel that I've actually achieved more through strengthening my back muscles and improving my posture than working my abs beyond 10-15 minutes of daily maintenance.

              Comment


              • #8
                Good point about not neglecting the back and the rest of the body for that matter!

                That's why I really like Pilates and Yoga. Maybe I have really good instructors, but I know that I can feel "new" muscles all-over after taking their classes, not just in my abs.

                I went to a so-called "yoga" class at the gym last week, that was really a mix of fast-paced yoga and Pilates. What a workout that was!
                Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Success in the Saddle. It is a great series of 6 (now 8) 20-minute workouts that give you a nice workout with a focus on core. The more I read about working out, the more I appreciate their balance and design. Highly recommend.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Do you have a smartphone? I can recommend the Nike Training. It's free and has great workouts of all kind, including some specifically focusing on the core.

                    Other than that:

                    Bicycle crunches are great.
                    Kickdowns.
                    Walking planks (from plank to your elbows and back up, so hard!!)
                    Side planks
                    Plank to rotation (knee to other elbow)

                    Standing balance poses work your core, too. If you're a yoga person, you will know some of those.

                    Have fun!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Fixating View Post
                      These are all good examples, just wanted to add: don't neglect your back. I learned the hard way that abs aren't everything, and its very easy to become unbalanced if you don't focus on both. I feel that I've actually achieved more through strengthening my back muscles and improving my posture than working my abs beyond 10-15 minutes of daily maintenance.
                      The abdominals serve to flex, rotate and extend the spine, as well as stabilize it in any position. Exercises that engage the abdominals in primarily concentric contractions (like crunches in a supine position on the mat) are great if you're weak in that area, but they don't provide an overall balance to the rest of your abdominal wall and back. This is why planks (done correctly) are so effective. Stabilizing the spine in a neutral position isometrically (muscles don't lengthen or shorten) develops our pelvic and scapular stabilizers, resulting in less tension and/or pain as we return to upright functional positions. Eccentric movements - particularly with the abdominals - are, in my opinion, even better. In an eccentric movement the muscle lengthens as the tension increases due to a greater force. Do I want to sit on a horse (or in a chair, or stand) flexed forward into a c-shape with my spine? No. I want to be in a stabilized, vertically neutral position. If I find that vertical neutral position seated on the mat with my knees bent and feet flat, and engage the abdominals to maintain that position while hinging backward from the hip, I'll feel the eccentric effect on not only the rectus, but also the obliques and transverse abdominus. The multifidus around my spine will work bilaterally to keep my spine from rotating, and the erector spinae will be engaged isometrically to prevent my spine from extending. I won't have to hinge back very far to feel this effect, and I only want to go back as far as I can maintain that neutral position. An exercise like this challenges the core to get stronger, but benefits my end-goal - an upright column in the tack.

                      As riders we also must consider exercises and how they effect our hips and lumbo-pelvic region. Plyometrics or other exercises that encourage dynamic movement increase the challenge on the joint to both stabilize and mobilize. We lose control over these end-range movements when we begin to fatigue and, thusly, compromise the health of the joint. Squats and lunges encourage quite a bit of hip flexion. As riders, our hips are almost always flexed in the tack, and if we're not strong through the core we can actually increase that load on the hip to the point there is 24/7 gripping or tightening at the joint. Again, balancing the development of the muscle and/or group is key. Developing the hip extensors (glutes primarily and some hamstrings), as well as the hip adductors (inner thighs) will balance the typical rider development scenario: over-development of the lateral rotators of the hip and hip flexors. This is where squats are beneficial. I think they're most-effective and beneficial when done in such a way that the spine remains upright and neutral as the hip flexes and the knee bends. Gravity assists in the downward movement so the flexion at the hip isn't as prominent, but on the way up, the focus should be on the glutes working to return the pelvis to upright neutral. If neutral is retained throughout, the abdominal wall will, again, be challenged as it is in plank, or the hinge I described earlier.

                      It's not about quantity of reps, it's about quality of engagement and stopping prior to causing injury.

                      Visit www.stottpilates.com for more information and a really amazing library of AT-HOME dvds.
                      When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        About a year ago I started weekly pilates and yoga (not fast) classes. While I'm pretty strong generally, even as the calendar is flipping by, I really didn't have much of a "core".

                        That has changed completely and overall I'm stronger and more flexible. But one of the BEST things about these classes is that I am much more able to isolate various body parts; to do something w/ one and not get all out of kilter with the rest.

                        Instructors in the class are constantly saying "move x and don't wiggle y; relax shoulders and neck"
                        We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I love BeamFit, and their three main work outs. Abs; Hips, Thighs and Buttocks; and BeamLates. I'm a huge fan, actually. It makes you do all the workouts, while balanced on a beam, so it works your core both in the exercise as well as while you are balanced on a 6" wide beam, about 1.5-2" off the ground.
                          Carli
                          dressage. n, the passionate pursuit of perfection by the obsessively imperfect.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            P90x and insanity have helped tremendous with my riding. Im now doing a hybrid of the two programs. My core has gotten so much stronger which has helped with me sit the trot. I love the variety of the workouts and P90x focuses on all the muscles. It's great

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have been working out with a personal trainer since April. She is terrific and has so many exercises. Most challenging core one recently has been to do a plank with my feet on the wall about 6 inches off the ground. We did a 30 second one and then a 45 second. It was pretty challenging/painful/awful.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I do the crunch time pilates.... focused on my core...they are amazing
                                Nothing better than an OTTB.... Just Plan Partners,Penny, you have stolen my heart<3

                                http://secondchancethoroughbreds.org

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Find a Bar Method or other Lotte Berk derived class in your area. You will get incredibly strong and flexible... but your physique will be much more similar to that of a dancer than a gym rat.

                                  I've been taking classes for many months now, and not only do I look like the girls in the pictures (finally), but I've noticed all kinds of benefits in the saddle.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Get a bar with free weights
                                    Do squats with your head up and looking towards the ceiling as you squat. Impossible to cheat and it will do wonders for your core

                                    Kneel on ground with bar in front

                                    Roll out until you belly is almost touching the ground, then go back. Have fun. Even 3 reps will kill. Once you are up to 20 your core is rock.

                                    You don't have to go anywhere to do this!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Squats and walking leg lunges...oh yeah, and digging post holes for fences...LOL

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by touchadream View Post
                                        I love the P90x ab ripper and legs adn back. I saw a huge difference in my riding ability when I did P90x and focused on legs and back work out and ab ripper.

                                        I also like Insanity. There is a lot of core work in that video series and you get the cardio with the core workout.

                                        Originally posted by Dressagefit View Post
                                        P90x and insanity have helped tremendous with my riding. Im now doing a hybrid of the two programs. My core has gotten so much stronger which has helped with me sit the trot. I love the variety of the workouts and P90x focuses on all the muscles. It's great


                                        P90X2 focuses even more on the core, but absolutely, the first one, along with Insanity (and Asylum ), are fantastic for core work. The exercises that aren't even focused on the core still have a core component.

                                        Originally posted by Robby Johnson View Post
                                        The abdominals serve to flex, rotate and extend the spine, as well as stabilize it in any position. Exercises that engage the abdominals in primarily concentric contractions (like crunches in a supine position on the mat) are great if you're weak in that area, but they don't provide an overall balance to the rest of your abdominal wall and back. This is why planks (done correctly) are so effective. Stabilizing the spine in a neutral position isometrically (muscles don't lengthen or shorten) develops our pelvic and scapular stabilizers, resulting in less tension and/or pain as we return to upright functional positions. Eccentric movements - particularly with the abdominals - are, in my opinion, even better. In an eccentric movement the muscle lengthens as the tension increases due to a greater force. Do I want to sit on a horse (or in a chair, or stand) flexed forward into a c-shape with my spine? No. I want to be in a stabilized, vertically neutral position. If I find that vertical neutral position seated on the mat with my knees bent and feet flat, and engage the abdominals to maintain that position while hinging backward from the hip, I'll feel the eccentric effect on not only the rectus, but also the obliques and transverse abdominus. The multifidus around my spine will work bilaterally to keep my spine from rotating, and the erector spinae will be engaged isometrically to prevent my spine from extending. I won't have to hinge back very far to feel this effect, and I only want to go back as far as I can maintain that neutral position. An exercise like this challenges the core to get stronger, but benefits my end-goal - an upright column in the tack.

                                        As riders we also must consider exercises and how they effect our hips and lumbo-pelvic region. Plyometrics or other exercises that encourage dynamic movement increase the challenge on the joint to both stabilize and mobilize. We lose control over these end-range movements when we begin to fatigue and, thusly, compromise the health of the joint. Squats and lunges encourage quite a bit of hip flexion. As riders, our hips are almost always flexed in the tack, and if we're not strong through the core we can actually increase that load on the hip to the point there is 24/7 gripping or tightening at the joint. Again, balancing the development of the muscle and/or group is key. Developing the hip extensors (glutes primarily and some hamstrings), as well as the hip adductors (inner thighs) will balance the typical rider development scenario: over-development of the lateral rotators of the hip and hip flexors. This is where squats are beneficial. I think they're most-effective and beneficial when done in such a way that the spine remains upright and neutral as the hip flexes and the knee bends. Gravity assists in the downward movement so the flexion at the hip isn't as prominent, but on the way up, the focus should be on the glutes working to return the pelvis to upright neutral. If neutral is retained throughout, the abdominal wall will, again, be challenged as it is in plank, or the hinge I described earlier.

                                        It's not about quantity of reps, it's about quality of engagement and stopping prior to causing injury.

                                        Visit www.stottpilates.com for more information and a really amazing library of AT-HOME dvds.
                                        Great post Robby!

                                        It's not just about the abs. Your core is EVERYTHING, front to back, full 360, from your hips to your armpits.

                                        There are a thousand variations of plank work, a thousand variations of ab work (and many of them don't involve laying down) and many, many variations of back work to get that angle too.

                                        Yoga is great. Pilates is great. Weights are great, but even then, you don't always even need physical weights to get this work done - your own body weight can be used greatly against you

                                        Push-ups - yes, it's traditionally for the chest, but done RIGHT, it's also core work. Same with pullups/chinups, and the variations there can increase the core work.
                                        ______________________________
                                        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

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