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Baby/Green Horse Thread

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  • Original Poster

    #81
    Originally posted by Tanyanoel View Post
    My pretty girl Foxy (aka Flashdance) is coming along so well, she is a very willing and quiet girl. She is still in Texas and comes home in a few weeks, she has been under saddle since mid/late October and I just got a new video of her today.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqdPsr4Wtdo

    I feel like a little girl I am so in love with her!!!!
    I loved that vid... the music was perfect! Your mare is adorable, looks like she is really coming along.

    Schimmel, I totally get your reluctance. FWIW, I have a 4 year old Morgan mare. I'm 30 and while I don't have any anxiety, I DO have an awareness that I don't bounce like I used to. And with two kids, a husband, a job, blah blah there's even more on the line. I had a collapsed lung this fall due to illness, so I'm trying to be careful, and have a friend hacking my mare right now.

    My experience thus far with my mare.... she was unbroke when I got her, though had some driving training. I think we pushed her to canter too quickly and she started bucking pretty hard through the transition. For a horse that was bred to TROT, and prefers to trot, she doesn't have a natural canter like a WB that's bred for the hunter ring might. So we've scaled back and are working on her balance at the trot, baby lateral work, building muscle, strength, and really emphasizing forward and straight! I see a huge improvement in her canter on the line, but we are in no hurry to re-introduce it under saddle just yet.

    A crowhop here and there is one thing, but a bronco-style buck is different. Ideally, you have a professional starting or riding the horse that knows how to avoid pressing or picking a fight, and doesn't let them ever *learn* to do it. KWIM? I know LOTS of babies who never did any bronco bucking, ever.

    My mare has the BEST brain, is incredibly smart, sensible, and sane. In a year she is going to be rock solid under saddle. She's a great mover and has a super work ethic. I think Morgans are awesome options for adult ammies, they are a very well kept secret IMO!
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

    Comment


    • #82
      Originally posted by luvmydutch View Post
      Definitely not all young horses are that way. ESPECIALLY if they are started by a professional. My mom and I both have young horses that we bought unbroken and sent out for training for 30 days, and have done all the work ourselves. I have yet to fall off mine (well except for one time she spooked and i lost a stirrup...not a bad one)...my mom has been dumped once by a bad spook and got a concussion. Neither of them have had a spook since.

      I absolutely love riding my 3 year old. She is quiet and easy going and cares about me. She tries hard and works hard and enjoys her work. If she is stiff or resistant, i can be sure it is because she's uncomfortable, not because she is being a brat. I gallop her through fields and take her trail riding, in addition to dressage (not a lot of trails, but a little here and there). I ride her exclusively in a huge open field and she is super trustworthy.

      They both throw small bucks occasionally going into the canter. My horse used to throw bigger bucks going into the canter, but has outgrown them (when they buck, get after them!).

      I don't think a young horse who is handled kindly growing up is any more dangerous than an older horse. I would want to know how they were raised though. I would rather see a horse wild and unhandled than mistreated.

      Completely agree. I sent my 3 y/o to a highly recommended cowboy for 20 days to start him and it was the best decision and so worth the money. He is the quietest, sanest horse I have ever ridden. I have had two falls in 6 months......once the first time I sat on him (a girthy mini-buck that I was totally unprepared for because I was in the fetal position), and once last week when he jumped me out of the tack over a 1 foot jump. Babies
      **Member of the Ocularly Challenged Equine Support Group**

      Comment


      • #83
        Schimmel - no it is not a young horse thing. Young horses tend to be unbalanced, lack muscle strength, have shorter attention spans, might be a bit looky, but they're no more likely to misbehave than older horses. It comes down to breeding, temperament and training/handling.

        I have two Saddlebred mares who have never bucked under saddle. Not once. One of them needed regular adjustments to her pelvis/sacrum and would do little "bunny hops" behind when she was sore or uncomfortable, but that was the extent of her "naughty" behaviour, if you want to call it that.

        I have bred babies out of these two mares - and started two of them under saddle myself. No bucking. I got one rear, once, and it was 100% my fault (it involved a fertilizer truck, an open field and me getting way too rough with my hands). No bolting, no head snaking, no bucking.

        I feel 100% safe at all times on my youngsters. Dangerous/panicky/unruly behaviour is simply not part of their repertoire.

        I hesitate to get on a "made" horse i don't know, but i will happily throw a leg over any one of my 3 yr olds and hack down a busy road on a windy day, alone. I trust them - they "have my back". It's a great feeling.

        This weekend my 14-yr old cousin (who is an advanced beginner, started taking lessons in July) will be doing a couple of classes in the barn "Christmas Fun Show" - on my 3.5 yr old greenie. He packs her around like a reliable old schoolie.
        www.jlsporthorsesales.net

        Comment


        • #84
          Originally posted by schimmel View Post
          Should I not get a young horse unless I am prepared to possibly be tossed?
          I would actually answer this with a yes. I agree not all young horses will buck you off, I've started plenty that never did. But young horses try things out and their reactions can be less predictable. Anyone that says they aren't is lying IMO. I would never recommend someone buy a young horse that is worried about it.
          On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

          Comment


          • #85
            I want to join in

            I got his guy in October. A 4 year old Reg'd 1/2 Trakehner gelding by Tagaelen. He is very sweet but a bit timid.

            Here is the day I got him

            http://fillysbestfriend.blogspot.com...day-to-me.html

            Here he is after one week, with the free lunge video (the reason I got him)

            http://fillysbestfriend.blogspot.com...er-week-1.html

            Here he is after 3 weeks. This one shows my first ride, and after 2 weeks under saddle.

            http://fillysbestfriend.blogspot.com...am-week-3.html

            And my latest frustrations...

            http://fillysbestfriend.blogspot.com...ll-aboard.html
            Boss Mare Eventing Blog
            https://www.youtube.com/user/jealoushe

            Comment


            • #86
              Q today

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Vj2MjY6uCU




              Comment


              • #87
                Jealoushe: " I asked him to walk forward and BOOM! Bronc horse wanna be scooting his butt and almost running me over. I stopped him, reassured him"

                Hmmm...maybe that is the time he should be made to work, work, work and not be rewarded by reassuring him for his bad behavior...just a thought. Otherwise, he sure is looking good after you wormed him, etc. Looks like he can really jump. Hang in there! "you have time"...He's a really nice looking boy!

                Student: What a beauty!

                Comment


                • #88
                  ground exercises

                  After starting my first "charge" using TTOUCH ground exercises, she was a large 17 hands at 2 years Clyde Tbx!with the ground exercises/ obstacles; I never again tried it without; seeing how the horse gains confidence as they learn to control their bodies while negotiating the obstacles and how wonderfully they focus on the job at hand; looking at the exercises as a giant puzzle to be solved; what they learn is applied directly to "real life"If you enjoy seeing horses learn; , you will enjoy this approach; you can also ride through the exercises Just the basic labyrinth teaches walking forward into the halt yielding to one rein before turning moving forward off the inside leg; filling the "outside rein"bending through the ribcage as they turn; it all happens so easily and naturally I think the riders gain as much as the horses do The kids I started this way became very confident sensitive riders; very aware of the horses
                  breeder of Mercury!

                  remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

                  Comment


                  • #89
                    Student, I'll be over with my trailer later this week. If you listen closely during that video Q keeps saying over and over that he wants to be under my Christmas tree. Don't feel bad. I'll take good care of him and send you lots of pictures as we conquer the dressage world together

                    Jealoushe, welcome! Good job on realizing there is a hole in your training and taking the time to restart rather than just push through and hoping it goes away! Groundword is your friend and there are tons of different methods for teaching confidence building and coping with fear skills. Do your research and find a method that works for you and above all DON'T get frustrated! Easier said than done, right!?

                    I've specialized in problem animals as I'm a behaviorist and my main piece of advice is to remember to do TINY BABY STEPS and don't move forward until you've confirmed calmness in whatever you're working on. If you don't have a relaxed, calm and bored horse you're not ready for the next step. I've dealt with TONS of fear horse, anxiety horses and even horses with severe aggression. Every single one of them goes back to the basics and learns calm, rational and relaxed ways of dealing with things before we even think of moving forward. There's a light at the end of the tunnel...I have yet to fail with one and all have turned into stupendous horses. Even the one that got kicked out of 3 barns, was a biter, a kicker, a bolter, a dragger, a charger and a striker. Only took 3 weeks and I had a happy, loving and willing partner! But if you feel over your head or stuck don't be afraid or embarrassed to say "I need a pro!" and find a good one!

                    Best of luck and what a beautiful boy!!
                    Please excuse the typos...I'm always on my iPhone and autocorrect is not my friend. Yes I mean mares autocorrect...not mates.

                    Comment


                    • #90
                      Originally posted by Keg-A-Bacchus View Post
                      Student, I'll be over with my trailer later this week. If you listen closely during that video Q keeps saying over and over that he wants to be under my Christmas tree. Don't feel bad. I'll take good care of him and send you lots of pictures as we conquer the dressage world together
                      !
                      hahaha. Oh this that what he's saying? I don't know how he'd feel about WI- we're in MA and he gets grumpy about the cold here lol.

                      Comment


                      • #91
                        Originally posted by fairtheewell View Post
                        Jealoushe: " I asked him to walk forward and BOOM! Bronc horse wanna be scooting his butt and almost running me over. I stopped him, reassured him"

                        Hmmm...maybe that is the time he should be made to work, work, work and not be rewarded by reassuring him for his bad behavior...just a thought. Otherwise, he sure is looking good after you wormed him, etc. Looks like he can really jump. Hang in there! "you have time"...He's a really nice looking boy!
                        I would agree, but with this guy he really hasn't had much work before I got him, other than brought in from the field, lunged and someone thrown on him a few times which ended disasterously. He has a genuine look of nervousness in his eye at that point. His old owner told me she worked with him for 5 months straight (lunging mostly) and there was no change. She suggested I just learn how to "ride" through it.

                        With this guy, I do not think that is the right approach.

                        Originally posted by Keg-A-Bacchus View Post

                        Jealoushe, welcome! Good job on realizing there is a hole in your training and taking the time to restart rather than just push through and hoping it goes away! Groundword is your friend and there are tons of different methods for teaching confidence building and coping with fear skills. Do your research and find a method that works for you and above all DON'T get frustrated! Easier said than done, right!?

                        I've specialized in problem animals as I'm a behaviorist and my main piece of advice is to remember to do TINY BABY STEPS and don't move forward until you've confirmed calmness in whatever you're working on. If you don't have a relaxed, calm and bored horse you're not ready for the next step. I've dealt with TONS of fear horse, anxiety horses and even horses with severe aggression. Every single one of them goes back to the basics and learns calm, rational and relaxed ways of dealing with things before we even think of moving forward. There's a light at the end of the tunnel...I have yet to fail with one and all have turned into stupendous horses. Even the one that got kicked out of 3 barns, was a biter, a kicker, a bolter, a dragger, a charger and a striker. Only took 3 weeks and I had a happy, loving and willing partner! But if you feel over your head or stuck don't be afraid or embarrassed to say "I need a pro!" and find a good one!
                        Thank you so much for your advice! Since that last blog post of frustration station we have improved. My frustration comes from wanting to improve and move ahead consistently....but I keep telling myself we have ALL the time in the world. Writing about it helps me keep things in perspective.

                        This week and last he has not bucked, or done the scootie butt thing once. I have been using a big western saddle that makes noise and hits all sorts of weird places and he just stands there bored when I put it on and take it off. He has been walking forward, and trotting with no tension and no intention to buck. This is big step for him!

                        I also noticed that when he would normally panic, or spook and take off bucking, he brings himself to a halt and looks at me for direction. This is much better! We started ground driving this week and it is going really well. He seems to really enjoy it actually.

                        I have spent a lot of time "sacking" him out, if you want to call it that. I can rub plastic bags, shavings bags, saddle pads, pretty much anything all over him and wave them around like crazy beside him and get no reaction. I am very happy with these results.

                        I am an eventer by sport, a dressage groom on the side, but I have found that the John Lyons method seems to be working for this guy. I'm going to keep pluggin along at it until he is comfortable with all the new things I ask of him. There is already a noticeable difference in his confidence and trust in me.

                        I am always open to advice
                        Boss Mare Eventing Blog
                        https://www.youtube.com/user/jealoushe

                        Comment


                        • #92
                          Jealoushe, well all I can say to you is something I try to tell myself, at least you have a horse that communicates with you! My pony is very sensitive and her natural way of being can be to freak a little then look to her person for guidance. The one time she bucked me off she just stood in the center of the ring staring at me looking horrified. Since then there have been times (mostly due to saddle issues) where she has clearly communicated her desire to rid herself of her saddle, but she has not really bucked again. I have learned her ways of communicating so I listen. Sounds like you are learning some of the same lessons.

                          I will say one of the hardest things about having a very young and green horse that is sensitive and communicative is the fact that I am always second guessing myself. I don't want to be that person that is so paranoid that I assume every resistance is a physical problem, but I also don't want to be the person that ignores it either.

                          Unfortunately the last 2 days the pony has not greeted me at the barn in her typical manner, usually she practically halters herself to go to work and instead she has walked away from me into her paddock. Sure enough I had a lesson and and she just felt weird. Well she is off on the right front Hopefully it's just the experiment we did with her last shoeing and we'll see how she goes after she is shod again this weekend.
                          On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

                          Comment


                          • #93
                            well balanced

                            He's really nicely balanced at the canter on the longe;; and love that Trakehner trot!
                            breeder of Mercury!

                            remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #94
                              Originally posted by Perfect Pony View Post
                              I will say one of the hardest things about having a very young and green horse that is sensitive and communicative is the fact that I am always second guessing myself. I don't want to be that person that is so paranoid that I assume every resistance is a physical problem, but I also don't want to be the person that ignores it either.
                              So true! Though I tend to just second guess myself because I am afraid of "ruining" her. With the other horses I've had, they were already jacked up and needed retraining. So there wasn't much I could do to make the problem worse, kwim? With Bella, she's so fresh and green and willing I'm always worried about messing her up.

                              MiasPal had another great ride on her this weekend. We try to keep sessions short, but I've noticed I have noticed that once she hits the 20 minute mark she wants to be done, so time to start stretching the rides a little longer...
                              We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

                              Comment


                              • #95
                                Originally posted by Perfect Pony View Post
                                I would actually answer this with a yes. I agree not all young horses will buck you off, I've started plenty that never did. But young horses try things out and their reactions can be less predictable. Anyone that says they aren't is lying IMO. I would never recommend someone buy a young horse that is worried about it.
                                I couldn't agree more. I understand that breeding and training comes into account, but I always feel more nervous on a young horse because they're so unpredictable.
                                What I ride
                                Where I tack up
                                <3 Michelle

                                Comment


                                • #96
                                  Shawnee I use a very similar method with great success.

                                  I do this with any horse I get, esp the trouble makers. Then when I do ride there are no major issues.

                                  Comment


                                  • #97
                                    I just started my 2009 colt and I'm excited to be able to add some of my own adventures to this thread! Here is a video of his third time undersaddle and his time cantering undersaddle. Some mild silliness, but nothing too bad.

                                    http://www.youtube.com/embed/811NjQnAuio
                                    Pacific Coast Eventing
                                    Standing Yeager GF

                                    Comment


                                    • #98
                                      I just got a video sent to me of a 3 year olds first ride that my friend owns. She had him walk trot canter and hand gallop already First ride!

                                      They pony with another horse and they get them really good at it then pony with a rider and voila horse just went along no big deal.

                                      Amazed the helk outa me lol.

                                      The tb's here start like that too, they just hop on and have someone lunge them walk trot canter, and the riders are so light and undemanding the horse just goes like he has a western saddle on lol.
                                      ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
                                      http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

                                      Comment


                                      • #99
                                        Such an elegant guy! Just beautiful. Good job SQ!!

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by fairtheewell View Post
                                          Such an elegant guy! Just beautiful. Good job SQ!!
                                          Thanks! He has been such a blast!
                                          Pacific Coast Eventing
                                          Standing Yeager GF

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