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Canter Examples

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  • Canter Examples

    Hi guys,

    I was wondering if anyone can provide examples (preferably videos) of a great canter. More specifically, I am not looking to see videos of horses that are already schooling really well in dressage. I am looking for examples of a great canter from a prospect horse, that doesn't have dressage training or very little. I want to educate myself as to what to look for if I am looking for a dressage prospect. Horses off-the-track would be an easy example of what I am looking for, but really whatever can be provided is perfectly fine. It would also be great to get a few sentences as to what I am looking at in the video that makes that particular horse a good example. Thanks, everyone!

  • #2
    Finding canter videos of newly off the track horses (CANTER and Finger Lakes, etc.) can be difficult. My recommendation in these cases would be to look for a great walk, since the quality of the walk is often an indication of the quality of the canter.

    Comment


    • #3
      Just look for canters with lots of jump - air time - and which can be lengthened and shortened. Of course they should be 3 beats. For prospects I also like to see them do flying changes (tempi's) in the field (if possible). That's when you know they have talent!
      Now in Kentucky

      Comment


      • #4
        http://www.eurodressage.com/equestri...-elite-auction

        Click on the video link on the upper right. this is a 3 year old mare. The canter should be swinging, and rhthymical with a clear 3 beat and a clear moment of suspension. You want uphill balance. You want the hind end to reach well underneath the body and to see bending of the hocks. The canter should look effortless and joyful.

        This example is just a video clip I happenend to see today. In my opinion, this is an exceptional horse she has 3 very good above average gaits. My favorite gait is her trot.

        If you look at the elite auction links or bundeschampion links you will see a lot of good canter examples in young horses

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dudleyc View Post
          http://www.eurodressage.com/equestri...-elite-auction

          Click on the video link on the upper right. this is a 3 year old mare. The canter should be swinging, and rhthymical with a clear 3 beat and a clear moment of suspension. You want uphill balance. You want the hind end to reach well underneath the body and to see bending of the hocks. The canter should look effortless and joyful.

          This example is just a video clip I happenend to see today. In my opinion, this is an exceptional horse she has 3 very good above average gaits. My favorite gait is her trot.

          If you look at the elite auction links or bundeschampion links you will see a lot of good canter examples in young horses
          Yummy filly
          Groom to trainer: "Where's the glamour? You promised me glamour!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow, that guy's feet (in the linked video) were really swinging.
            Yes, I know how to spell. I'm using freespeling!

            freespeling

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm not writing to brag, but I believe my young horse has a good canter for dressage, and he's not a $$$ money WB so he's a good example of what a nice canter looks like in a more everyday horse.

              http://www.vimeo.com/29484418

              Just look at any of the recent vids, most show some canter. Most canter is at the end of each clip, so just advance the vid until you see it.

              He's four and developing his strength, but you'll notice a few things about his canter:

              1.Rhythm: He has a very clear natural rhythm, even on the earliest canter vids. His rhythm is quite consistent, regardless of whether he's working in an "up" or stretched outline.
              2.Balance: Watch him in the corners. He sort of "stands up" and naturally balances himself and doesn't lean or scramble. This was not trained in.
              3. Use of hindleg: Even at this early stage of his training (and he's been trained by a non-pro, I might add), he still shows a good hind leg that naturally steps way under in the canter. If you pause his canter at the moment he's pushing off, you'll see how nicely under himself he is.

              I think he's a good example of a naturally solid canter for dressage.
              2007 Welsh Cob C X TB GG Eragon
              Our training journal.
              1989-2008 French TB Shamus Fancy
              I owned him for fifteen years, but he was his own horse.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by altjaeger View Post
                Wow, that guy's feet (in the linked video) were really swinging.
                You just need to watch more of these auction riders - they are very active with aids.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I look for horses with jump and powerful hinds and ability to do changes.

                  We bought a horse from a nutty lady who demonstrated a horse cantering on the lunge in the mud on the side of a hill. He was up, jumping into the canter and great balance DESPITE everything. He is amazing.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Thanks, everybody! I can definitely see the reach in the videos, however, for some reason, I can't tell what "jump" is. I know I can feel a great canter, but when I see these videos, I can't see the jump in the gait. That aspect all looks the same to me. What part of the horse's body is even doing the jumping? What am I supposed to be looking at, exactly? Please explain! Thanks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Maybe it would help you to compare the two videos. Both horses have nice canters, but the first has lots of jump and the second doesn't.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jump = Air time = suspension.
                        Now in Kentucky

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dudleyc View Post
                          http://www.eurodressage.com/equestri...-elite-auction

                          Click on the video link on the upper right. this is a 3 year old mare. The canter should be swinging, and rhthymical with a clear 3 beat and a clear moment of suspension. You want uphill balance. You want the hind end to reach well underneath the body and to see bending of the hocks. The canter should look effortless and joyful.

                          This example is just a video clip I happenend to see today. In my opinion, this is an exceptional horse she has 3 very good above average gaits. My favorite gait is her trot.

                          If you look at the elite auction links or bundeschampion links you will see a lot of good canter examples in young horses
                          Yes, but those canters are going to CO$T you $$$!! Big time!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            OP,

                            I think jump can best be seen by watching the rhythm. If the horse has good jump (or will be able to develop it, if you're looking at a young horse or one off the track), then there should be a "pause" between strides. That's the moment of suspension. My horses canter strides are really defined, in part because he hangs in the air a split second between strides.

                            Wish more people would post examples for you. It would be nice to see other nice canters, from a sampling of breeds. I KNOW there are lots of nice horses+ canters on this board.
                            2007 Welsh Cob C X TB GG Eragon
                            Our training journal.
                            1989-2008 French TB Shamus Fancy
                            I owned him for fifteen years, but he was his own horse.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              When I went to see some yearling/2 yos, it seemed like the ones with a great, uphill canter were the ones more likely to play in the canter (leap, lead changes, bucking, mini rears-canter-thingies) while those without a great canter would run and get pogo-stick like with straight front legs. Of course, there are exceptions, but the more extravagant babies in their play tend to be the more extravagant horses undersaddle.
                              Pacific Coast Eventing
                              Standing Yeager GF

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                O.K., I'll play. Maybe this will be a half-way relevant example.

                                I bought this 9 yr old 'project' gelding out of someones 'backyard' very, very cheaply. He had absolutely NO dressage experience and very little, if any, formal training of any kind.

                                Here is a short video of the 'raw' material taken last year very shortly after I bought him and BEFORE any real dressage training began.

                                http://youtu.be/UOOFcW3iYIs

                                In spite of his AA owner's (me) VERY limited training experience/knowledge and only sporadic lessons, we showed at 1st level this year with scores in the mid 60's, 7's on his gaits and judges comments that he can easily get higher scores if he relaxes a little ('we' get a little tense at shows)....plus his rider (me), needs to improve A LOT.

                                No, he is not the 'uber' mover like the auction filly above, but then again, I didn't pay big bucks for him either. BUT, I think he has very nice raw gaits, is very balanced and rhythmical, has developed even better jump in his canter, and counter-canter is a breeze for him. He easily overstrides at the walk by about 2+ hoof prints....and offered effortless half-steps in my lesson on Saturday. We will be working on our changes this winter and hope to show solid 2nd and school 3rd next year.

                                There are diamonds out there....good luck with your search.

                                eta - STSF, VERY cute horse!
                                Last edited by cb06; Oct. 10, 2011, 07:15 PM.
                                Wiiliam
                                "A good horse is worth more than riches."
                                - Spanish Proverb

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Well here is Rex. I think he has a nice canter. He def has a really nice rhythm. He doesnt have the big jump right now but I def feel that once hes in true work that it will not be a problem.

                                  Here in this video he is 3.5. We were still dealing with the "oooh Im not going to turn... ok I will!" thing and just gaining balance with a rider on (and me working on riding a green canter and trusting to let go and that he will turn lol)

                                  First Mr Trainer (I think this is like our 3rd lesson together and Rex's like 15-18th ride). He was playing around with his "changes" which right now are flat "hunter" changes but naturally there. Canter starts around 3:00.
                                  http://www.facebook.com/v/1846381326478

                                  And then me... yes we still have drunken baby horse and me! lol Canter starts around 0:58
                                  http://www.facebook.com/v/1842421187477


                                  In this video he is 4 month shy of 4 y/o. He has been u/s since Nov 2010 but by May, he had only had ~30 total rides since then (taking it really slow due to his size, etc). So this was around ride 25. Right lead starts around 1:30 and then left lead around 2:17
                                  http://www.facebook.com/v/1910600451916


                                  Hes a nice horse with ammy friendly gaits. Nothing you would see in those auctions or anything but I think hes kind of nice... lol
                                  ~~~~~~~~~

                                  Member of the ILMD[FN]HP Clique, The Florida Clique, OMGiH I loff my mares, and the Bareback Riders clique!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    This is my horse two months off the track:

                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zm4K4YV56ps

                                    This is him about three months later

                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lka2albCKPA

                                    Last July, 14 months after I got him off the track. Canter at around 2:00.

                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0cQt15AYhg
                                    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                                    A helmet saved my life.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by SisterToSoreFoot View Post
                                      I'm not writing to brag, but I believe my young horse has a good canter for dressage, and he's not a $$$ money WB so he's a good example of what a nice canter looks like in a more everyday horse.

                                      http://www.vimeo.com/29484418
                                      It's okay to brag!

                                      How could he even concentrate with all that hay in the arena?
                                      2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                                      A helmet saved my life.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        How about a baby? Here's my yearling as a wee little tot:
                                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nxkrn1bFtf4

                                        And here's an older one form the same farm. I think this one has a very nice canter:

                                        http://youtu.be/hC0JVdwK0f0

                                        Comment

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