• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Getting Forward on a Cold Blooded Horse?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Getting Forward on a Cold Blooded Horse?

    I have a 9 year old STB/perch cross who has been used for pleasure riding: English and Western, but has no dressage training. He's new to me (2 months) and doesn't have alot of muscle yet. As a result of this legacy he is quite happy to plod along at an easy tea-sipping gait be it walk or trot. I’ve been trying to get him more forward. I started off wearing my Prince of Wales spurs –mild spurs – thinking that I could give him a nice unambiguous cue when he gets behind the leg. It didn’t quite work that way. Yes he got more forward, but he also got twitchy. This is likely because my leg became very noisy in the process of schooling this horse. I also developed other bad habits like trying to help him forward by pushing my arms in front of me and hunching my shoulders (can you visualize that?).

    I’ve had great advice from many people, including most recently lovey1121. We do have a small cross country course behind the barn –it’s small but it’s slopey and bendy and comes with a steep sided pond. Lovey suggests I get forward out there. I’ve also ditched my spurs and shortened my stirrups. I did not expect, but found that I use my leg better without stirrups. So now I don’t hesitate to feel him with my whole leg and give him a good solid thump when he doesn’t respond to my forward cue. Also I have begun using a strong verbal cue to go forward. For example, yesterday afternoon we worked in the ring trotting the long sides and walking the short sides. I used the corners as you might to introduce canter on the correct lead, as transition points. The transitions were “and TROT” or “and walk”. The trot was usually fine but if he lagged I gave him a good thump with my heels to get him on again. This seems to have worked. And he’s a very smart guy, so he got those verbal cues really fast.

    My boy Carl Hester (I heart him) has a technique for creating responsiveness. He will ask first and then if he doesn’t get it, he’ll throw the reins and kick into a gallop –at least this was the report someone made from a 2005 clinic s/he attended. Sounds really effective, but I’m not sure I have the spine for it. Half the time I want to try it and half the time my brain goes “are you KIDDING”. I might be able to kick into a canter… would that be as effective.

    Any thoughts?

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

  • #2
    That is very similar to Jane Savoie's description of in front of the leg. You should be able to whisper an aid and the horse should SHOUT the response.


    So, if he doesn't respond to a light aid you really send him forward, (IME better with a whip than spurs, spurs are for refinement not brute force) making sure you don't inadvertently punish him by snatching him in the mouth. That's where the grab or bucking strap comes in. Let him go forward a ways then stop him and test for a response to light aids again. If he doesn't respond send him forward again.



    Jane Savoie has some great videos on youtube.
    Here are a few to get you started

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4QnhV8cH4M

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xq_0OdBEYFw

    She also has a very helpful newsletter and subscription website.

    Now I know you are not going to like this, sorry. I know we have discussions about fit and fat and I know you have said your fittness is improving but you still have a ways to go particularly in core strength. It really shows when you post. Do you have access to fittness classes or a gym where you teach?

    I have a BMI of 29 about the same as I believe you said you have.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/carolp3...52132904429762

    Can you see the difference in body control?
    Last edited by carolprudm; Sep. 13, 2011, 11:22 AM.
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

    Comment


    • #3
      From the description above...there's a chance the horse won't become more forward if s/he's feeling any unbalance or bouncing hands/legs.
      Usually the more forward/fast a horse gets the more those things amplify for the animal. Causes confusion and/or discomfort and also makes them feel off-balance.
      Are you working with/have access to an instructor? If so, ask that person to ride your horse forward and watch. If the horse starts picking up a more forward motion with a different rider then it could be that you'll need a bit more work on your position, balance or core.
      If the horse isn't willing to go forward with a more experienced rider then it could be that s/he needs more work, schooling and time so the horse feels more balanced him/herself. Then it might be a good idea to have some training rides weekly and also take some time without reins/irons to work on yourself. (on your horse or another) If the two of you both have a tough time with forward at the same time...it's not going to improve and may set some really hard-to-break bad habits for both of you.
      You jump in the saddle,
      Hold onto the bridle!
      Jump in the line!
      ...Belefonte

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Carol, I'm not offended at all. One thing I've discovered trying to school Fella is that I am not fit enough! I was fit enough to ride many lessons a week, but as with other observations about my form, I am learning that it is a different kettle of fish to school. My form has fallen apart with demands that I be a rider rather than a passenger with good position, and my fitness is in question for the same reason. It's not wind as much as much as muscle I think. I've got to include some core training somehow. Both schools have gyms that I think I have access to as an instructor.

        Misty, I do have access to a trainer and actually I'm discussing having him ride Fella at least once a week for 1/2 an hour. I'm also going to arrange some lunge sessions with my equitation trainer.

        I don't feel insecure on him. I've got nicely loose hips so I don't feel in danger of being unseated or anything like that. We'll continue with all the exercises for forward and keep these other options on the table.

        Gotta dash. I'll check in later.

        Paula
        He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

        Comment


        • #5
          Does he understand to go forward on the longe from a cluck? In hand from a cluck/tap with a whip where your leg would be?

          The methods described work only if the horse has been properly schooled to understand what the leg means. Both Carl and Jane IMO assume the homework has been done, which is typical foe trainers who work with a system. It is the correct way, horses have no inherent idea at all that the leg means anything let alone go.
          "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
          ---
          The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by paulaedwina View Post
            Carol, I'm not offended at all. One thing I've discovered trying to school Fella is that I am not fit enough! I was fit enough to ride many lessons a week, but as with other observations about my form, I am learning that it is a different kettle of fish to school. My form has fallen apart with demands that I be a rider rather than a passenger with good position, and my fitness is in question for the same reason. It's not wind as much as much as muscle I think. I've got to include some core training somehow. Both schools have gyms that I think I have access to as an instructor.
            Pilates and or Martial arts would be good for both core strength and control. Another alternative is Curves SMART, the computer monitored version. It can give you a real good comprenhensive workout in a half hour at a reasonable price. Even a weighted hula hoop helps.
            But you can't get fit to ride by just riding.

            BTW that video of me that I linked to was taken on a broiling hot day shortly after my 61 st birthday so it CAN be done
            Last edited by carolprudm; Sep. 13, 2011, 11:24 AM.
            I wasn't always a Smurf
            Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
            "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
            The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

            Comment


            • #7
              My boy Carl Hester (I heart him) has a technique for creating responsiveness. He will ask first and then if he doesn’t get it, he’ll throw the reins and kick into a gallop
              So why don't you go take a clinic with your boy? and get your BFF Carl to ride the horse. Because for sure if you try that technique at your level of fitness and expertise, you are asking for a bad result-anything from a good jab in the mouth that will sour your saintly horse to actually parting company which , from watching your other videos, your horse does NOT want you to do. Your horse has judged your ability to stay with him and has decided to not chance dropping you. Hence you perceive him as " quite happy to plod along at an easy tea-sipping gait be it walk or trot". Meanwhile, the horse is thinking: This chic can't balance to save her life so I am not going to let her go fast enough to lose control of herself and end up hurting me!

              I was fit enough to ride many lessons a week
              If you were fit enough for that, I think you have a very kind and tactful instructor, as well as a forgiving and savvy mount.

              Lose the spurs. You don't have enough body control to use them properly and they will only anger/twitchify your horse and build bad habits in you, as you've found out. Get thee to a workout place with a personal trainer and do your horse justice. You MUST be fitter than your horse to school. Try an hour of swimming and an hour of walking every day for three months and then come back and talk to us.

              In the meantime, ride your horse with one hand on a bucking strap or neckstrap so you can stabilize your core and not jab your horse, and if you want to go faster use voice or crop. But really, slow trotting up hills and along trails for an hour or two a day will get him just as fit as faster gaits for your level of training.

              This problem is really not about your horse.
              If it ain't broke- TRAIN IT!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by paulaedwina View Post
                I started off wearing my Prince of Wales spurs –mild spurs – thinking that I could give him a nice unambiguous cue when he gets behind the leg. It didn’t quite work that way. Yes he got more forward, but he also got twitchy.
                As a good friend/rider told me -- about the time you're skilled enough to use spurs correctly, you don't need them unless you're finessing higher level movements.

                Riding outside is a good idea, but I think you're onto something re: your own fitness. With a green horse, you have to quietly and consistently set parameters with your legs, seat and hands. So, rather than disciplining your horse when he isn't sufficiently forward, you make it the easy thing to do. You open the door and he goes through.

                But the door has to remain open -- no jiggling or bracing on the reins, no tight legs or bouncing seat to make forward less than a very pleasant thing to do for him. (IME, most horses LIKE to go forward. It's in their genetics. It's us humans who set them up to view forward as not fun.)

                In addition to working on your fitness and having the trainer ride your horse, take some lessons. He/she can help you focus on one or two things each time to work on in between.

                Your horse looks like a very willing soul. Just take your time, be patient and stop reading so much. Without the feel to go with it, you're just getting words on a page. Right now you need hands-on experience + eyes on the ground.

                Good luck and have fun.

                PS -- your horse not going forward may have little to with whether he's cold-blooded. The gelding is I ride is PB Arabian and they don't come much hotter blooded than him. He wasn't very forward either ... until I made it easy for him. Just FYI.
                Last edited by mp; Sep. 13, 2011, 12:00 PM. Reason: 'nother thought worth sharing
                __________________________
                "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
                the best day in ten years,
                you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

                Comment


                • #9
                  -Longe lessons. And more longe lessons. And more longe lessons.

                  -Pilates or yoga.

                  -A good but strict german trainer. They're huge into core strength. Ask me how I know THAT.

                  As someone said, he might be lacking the forward because you're unbalanced and he's being a saint in trying to keep you seated. (not saying that's the case, just that it could be). Lose the spurs, if you have poor leg control that will eventually make him cold to the spur.

                  Also, when you're schooling, remember that just because he is "green" to dressage, doesn't mean he can talk you out of having a correct position! I started rounding my shoulders (which are naturally rounder anyways) when schooling my OTTB, until a trainer yelled that at me. I mean, think about it: what does weakening your position by hunching and throwing your hands forward do for your horse? It sure doesn't help him! To get him thinking on his backend and off his forehand, you need to engage your seat and your core and sit UP. He should move forward into your hand; but that won't happen until you have enough body control to have quiet, sympathetic hands.

                  Good luck to you and Fella!
                  Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree that trails would be the way to go right now, and preferably ones with long straight stretches if you have access to them... I think the horse needs to free up his whole body, and needs you out of his way if he's going to learn to flow forward.

                    At the same time, you can be working on quieting your hands and legs on other horses... yes, this is partly a strength issue but also I think there's an element of coordination and independent control that's missing. The point is, in order to really develop FORWARD "Fella" needs to not feel impeded in any way. As it is he's not only sucking back and shuffling because that's what he thinks is right, he's also filtering out a lot of noise from the rider that doesn't help in developing responsiveness. Maybe the shortened stirrups have addressed this, but the exercise you mention from Carl Hester or the Jane Savoie one will only be effective if the aids are clear and not muddled with unintentional bumps and nudges with hands and legs. You're not that far off from this point, but for the moment you might want to do most of the work in walk where an independent seat is easier to maintain. Make that boy MARCH forward with every step, halt where you ask and move off crisply and energetically. Reinforce the leg aids with a strongish tap from the whip if you get anything less than an immediate response. Leave out the trot transitions until your hands are a bit more consistent.
                    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      You're all talking the truth. I'm at one of my schools now preparing for class and yes they have a gym, and yes I have free access I'm going to be at the other school tomorrow and I am sure the case is the same. Sigh

                      RE: Your horse has judged your ability to stay with him and has decided to not chance dropping you. Hence you perceive him as " quite happy to plod along at an easy tea-sipping gait be it walk or trot". Meanwhile, the horse is thinking: This chic can't balance to save her life so I am not going to let her go fast enough to lose control of herself [falling off]!

                      You are absolutely right. Fella has great packer potential. He came with that skill and unfortunately my ability on him has put me securely in his horse-sense category of packee.

                      BTW my boy Carl may be on the left coast in 2012. I'm going to have to save my ducats and go audit him.

                      RE: I started rounding my shoulders (which are naturally rounder anyways) when schooling my OTTB, until a trainer yelled that at me. I mean, think about it: what does weakening your position by hunching and throwing your hands forward do for your horse? It sure doesn't help him! To get him thinking on his backend and off his forehand, you need to engage your seat and your core and sit UP.

                      What an awful habit. On my commute to Hagerstown today I practiced being aware of where my shoulders and back were in relation to the seat while driving. I'd start off thinking and sitting up straight and then realize that I am sitting hunched forward and had no idea when that happened! So I'd sit up and back again, and then discover that somewhere along the line I hunched forward. I'm going to take advantage of the drive and work on that.

                      Paula
                      He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Do you get Dressage Today, or have someone you can borrow the September issue from?

                        Read the Heather Blitz article, and apply it as fits your skill/ability level right now. It's on the same idea as Carl Hester's tip, only more appropriate for any level of fitness and training for both horse and rider. I've actually found it works TOO well, and my horse starts cantering off each time I take a deep breath. Translation: I love it!

                        I think all the suggestions about working on yourself are great, too. But I am a confirmed "unworthy" rider when it comes to my horse - he keeps himself just where he's a challenge for me, and any time I improve he gets even better, so I'm the obvious limiting factor!
                        Originally posted by Silverbridge
                        If you get anything on your Facebook feed about who is going to the Olympics in 2012 or guessing the outcome of Bush v Gore please start threads about those, too.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post
                          Does he understand to go forward on the longe from a cluck? In hand from a cluck/tap with a whip where your leg would be?

                          The methods described work only if the horse has been properly schooled to understand what the leg means. Both Carl and Jane IMO assume the homework has been done, which is typical foe trainers who work with a system. It is the correct way, horses have no inherent idea at all that the leg means anything let alone go.
                          This x100.
                          We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            People would get on my Friesian and he would putz along, and I would get on, and his motor would turn on. With him, you had to be finely balanced and very strongly controlled in your core, or he just.wouldn't.go.at.all. I don't care how hard you whacked or kicked him. You had to sit up (not at all forward) and really commit to his forward.

                            Taking him out on the XC wouldn't have worked. Sure, he would GO out there, and then suck back as soon as I got back in the ring. It was really all about my own balance and core strength. Once I started working with a decent trainer who got me working on ME, our work together improved by leaps and bounds.

                            There is a certain mental component, as well, that I see a lot. You can say you want forward all you want, but you can see hesitation all too often in someone's balance and body language. Their voices say go, as do their legs and whips, but their bodies say stop stop stop.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I agree on the trails or put in the open suggestion. Fella needs to learn forward on as straight of terrain as possible. I also suggest popping him in a huntvseat saddle and getting up off his back and avoiding contact with his mouth while he learns to lift, stretch and go forward. I've retrained several Western horses and this was the best way to get them to open up. Unless you are an advanced upper level rider with impeccable control over your body and aids (and let's be honest...most of us aren't! LOL) then this is the best way to stay out of his way while he figures it out and you can work on quieting your hands and legs. Once he's strutting his stuff all big and stretchy and you're able to have quiet hands and a solid leg in a shortened stirrup hunt saddle switch to your dressage saddle in the trails and see if you can keep up the big, swinging, soft movement and quiet seat/hands in a dressage saddle. If THAT goes well then try bringing him in the arena and keeping the impulsion going. Sometimes circles and upright position are too advanced in the early stages of training and you just need to get out of his way and get him to where he can move out without hitting a wall. Also, during this time in the ring he can be lunged (no sidereins, etc) and teach him to move out forward without rushing. He should move off voice on the lunge exactly as you want him to move under saddle. Then, when you come in the ring again...longe lessons on your nicely trained horse who will go to the gait you verbally tell him to. If at this point he sucks back again then you'll know it's your riding and sadly (as we've all done before) you need to go back to the very basics and start from scratch on developing your seat and hand. If that happens we'll all be here to cheer you on and give you tips on restarting! :-D Sorry for any spelling errors, typing on my iPhone! LOL
                              Please excuse the typos...I'm always on my iPhone and autocorrect is not my friend. Yes I mean mares autocorrect...not mates.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by paulaedwina View Post
                                BTW my boy Carl may be on the left coast in 2012. I'm going to have to save my ducats and go audit him.
                                Not to take anything away from CH he is not the only great or even good clinician. I believe Paula Kierkeguard (SP?) travels regularly to your area. She's Gallopp (sp?) on UDBB. I've been lucky to see Lendon Gray, Steffen Peters and Jane Savoie teach and I am all twitterpated to see that Jane will be back at the Equine Extravaganza here in VA. Bummer that I'm not qualified to ride (training level on a good day when my ankle doesn't hurt) but I sure will be watching. See who will be teaching at the Equine Affair in Jan.
                                Join PVDA or at least check out their calendar
                                http://www.pvda.org/Lists/Calendar/D...alendar%2Easpx

                                http://www.pvda.org/Lists/Calendar/D...52F13%252F2011

                                http://www.pvda.org/Lists/Calendar/D...52F13%252F2011

                                ETA:, great as clinicians are IMHO NOTHING beats a good LOCAL instructor.
                                I wasn't always a Smurf
                                Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
                                "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                                The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  And truthfully, a clinician I saw made me do 6 months of riding with no contact, but she didn't make me ride like a hunter at the time - I was to send him forward BIG and hard, but I had to sit correctly - she stressed that I had to stand upright for part of the ride (I was kind of doing lunge work training on myself since the horse was decently broke by that time), holding onto the grab strap and testing to make sure that my feet were under me and I could balance. It was horrible...When she saw me again there had been a marked improvement. And I did get him out of the arena for this, but it wasn't the WHOLE secret. I suppose that's what I'm stressing. You can putz just as well on a trail as you can in the ring.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    My form has fallen apart with demands that I be a rider rather than a passenger with good position, and my fitness is in question for the same reason.
                                    Just wanted to let you know that I feel ya here (and I have a BMI of about 19.5). I have the opposite problem you have -- my horse is very forward and is more likely to rush than to plod -- but training a green (to dressage) horse really made me feel like I can't ride. The good news is that over several months it's starting to come together and it is SO much fun to be able to bring my own horse along. You've gotten lots of good advice. Don't forget to have fun too.
                                    MelanieC * Canis soloensis

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Forgot to add I second your decision to get rid of the spurs and second the decision in teaching him to move off a whip. I use the three strike rule...a proper leg cue. If no response a proper leg cue paired with a tap from the whip behind the leg. If no response a proper leg cue paired with a smack from the whip behind the leg. Don't punish a big response. Just repeat until he learns a proper leg cue means GO NOW! without the use of a whip. Better than having a dead sided horse who ignores your leg snd turns you into a bumping, pumping, kicking machine up there! LOL
                                      Please excuse the typos...I'm always on my iPhone and autocorrect is not my friend. Yes I mean mares autocorrect...not mates.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by mp View Post

                                        PS -- your horse not going forward may have little to with whether he's cold-blooded. The gelding is I ride is PB Arabian and they don't come much hotter blooded than him. He wasn't very forward either ... until I made it easy for him. Just FYI.
                                        Heh. Agree on this. My Morgan mare can be hot, but she will just laze around if I let her. (She is hot AND lazy at the same time.)

                                        She's a well-trained horse, and very easy to ride but very hard to ride correctly. That's true of a lot of good "packers."

                                        The "escalation of aids" works pretty well as long as you use aids the horse is familiar with. Mine will ignore my leg the first time, every ride, but after one massive correction (kick plus whip) followed by immediately dropping back down to the walk and retesting with a light aid, she'll listen to whispering aids for the rest of the ride, usually.

                                        Also, trail riding helps! Unfortunately most of the trails I have access to don't have great footing, so we have to stay at a walk, but I can make it an on-the-bit, marching walk when that's appropriate. (I don't ask for it when we're picking our way through rocks and tree roots, just when we have a stretch that's reasonably flat and not full of hazards.)
                                        You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                                        1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X