• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

fleece polo wraps -- proper application

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • fleece polo wraps -- proper application

    I've never had much luck applying polo wraps but I got a great set as a gift -- colored eskadron wraps. Pardon these silly questions...
    --My first attempt at wrapping I had too much left over (front legs), does anyone ever cut them down?
    --Is it desired that the velcro tabs end at the same place on each leg (outside near top)?
    -- I'd like to wrap under the fetlock joint and cross in the middle of the front of the fetlock --- I can't seem to do this! Here you can see the criss-cross ( http://www.classicequine.com/Images/...LOW4-SOLID.jpg )

    This isn't rocket science, but it feels like rocket science. Help!
    http://behindthebitblog.com
    Dressage, riding, sport horse blog
    BTBbrowbands.com
    Unique browbands for dressage and hunter riders

  • #2
    Don't cut them down, unless you have a pony and horse sized wraps. Especially since those Eskradron's are about $60 per pair!

    Start just below the knee, go down to the fetlock and back up once. You may have to overlap a little more if your horse has shorter or narrow cannon bones. I think the Pony Club manual had a great explanation on how to do it to get the V evenly in front. Some people don't go that low below the fetlock, I do to create a sling below the suspensory. I don't worry about where the velcro ends up, as long as the pressure is consistent. Don't put tension across the back of the leg, across the tendons.

    Just keep practicing - you'll get it!

    ET
    “You'll always miss 100% of the shots you don't take.” - Wayne Gretsky

    Comment


    • #3
      You need to practice daily for a few weeks. It will come.

      Ditto reading the pony club instructions. You may even find them online.

      Start on the inside of the leg, and bring the wrap in front of the cannon bone first, towards the outside, then back around the tendons. Your first turn should be a circle. After that, you start going down overlapping 2/3-1/2 of the last turn. That means you advance down the leg about 1/2 a wrap width each time around the leg. Focus on keeping the pressure constant, but never pull against the tendon.

      The v just takes practice. If you try to make the V too steep, you will either end up with a gappy bandage at the back, that you have to wrap over and cause wrinkles (which caused uneven pressure), or you will not overlap enough in the back and a gap in the wrap will appear once you start riding.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        two times the v!

        Hi,

        I read a couple of sites (have to look for the pony club pp) and hadn't realized that you wrap the v two times. That will make a difference :-).
        http://behindthebitblog.com
        Dressage, riding, sport horse blog
        BTBbrowbands.com
        Unique browbands for dressage and hunter riders

        Comment


        • #5
          have someone help you, and teach you how and then watch you do it. if the pressure is uneven it can cause bows, too loose it can slip. it takes practice, practice, practice....
          www.facebook.com/doggonegoodgoodies
          http://doggonebakedgoods.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            The way they are showed in the pix is going down to the fetlock at back up, that is how a standing bandage is put on, not a working one....that is why you have sooo much bandage. A working bandage is 'figure 8'/working bandage in application (can be seen in a pony club bandage). The right bandage is put on clockwise, and the left counter clockwise. Any tension pulling it tighter is across the bony on the front. But you go slightly down (when starting at the top) and then slightly back up. It looks like a series of x crosses, once down/covering the inside of the ankle then you can spiral back up. Have someone (a vet) teach you if need be. You do NOT go to the fetlock, but only the inside of the ankle.
            I.D.E.A. yoda

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ideayoda View Post
              The way they are showed in the pix is going down to the fetlock at back up, that is how a standing bandage is put on, not a working one....that is why you have sooo much bandage. A working bandage is 'figure 8'/working bandage in application (can be seen in a pony club bandage). The right bandage is put on clockwise, and the left counter clockwise. Any tension pulling it tighter is across the bony on the front. But you go slightly down (when starting at the top) and then slightly back up. It looks like a series of x crosses, once down/covering the inside of the ankle then you can spiral back up. Have someone (a vet) teach you if need be. You do NOT go to the fetlock, but only the inside of the ankle.
              Race trackers always go down and around the fetlock on their working bandages in case of rundowns. Dressage trainers don't (I guess there's not much chance of rundowns).
              Groom to trainer: "Where's the glamour? You promised me glamour!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Um, yes, I have cut the fronts. My mare is 16 h and relatively fine-boned. There are several nice wraps (Dover makes one) that come as 9 ft for the front and 11 ft for the hind, which is perfect.
                "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht

                Comment


                • #9
                  When I polo wrap I:
                  - Go horizontally across the tendon, and only angle up or down across the cannon.
                  - Go just to the ergot, any lower and I find they are likely to slip out of position.
                  - Layer closer toether on the fronts than the hinds.
                  - Always finish at the top.
                  Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    white there are some guidelines, there is no ONE right way. Depends on use.

                    As an ex-polo groom, I do consider myself a bit of an expert, since when I worked for the pro team on game day, I'd be putting on some 24 sets !

                    For polo, we would start just below the knee, but leave a "tail" hanging out at the top. Then you would go down, (always wrapping from inside leg back to the outside, keeping tension even) do a cross at the fetlock, then lay the "tail" down across the back of the tendon, THEN wrap back up again.

                    That would give the tendon alittle more protection in case it got whacked by a mallet or ball.

                    For dressage, you probably don't need the tail OR the cross at the fetlock, although the latter will give a bit more support.

                    And yes, you should (ideally) end up with the velcro near the top (at least the top third of the leg) and always on the outside.

                    Don't be afraid to put some tension on them as you wrap, because it would really take some yanking by the average female to cause damage, especially with a new set of wraps. Just make sure when you "pull" you are pulling when the wrap is crossing the front on the cannon bone, and NOT on the back (on the tendon).

                    More important is to keep the tension even, making sure the wrap is smooth and wrinkle-free and overlap each turn.

                    How much you overlap depends on the length of each horse's cannon bone, and that's where the experience comes in...lots of trial & error.

                    And, as I'm sure has been mentioned, when you roll 'em back up, start with them "inside out" -- in other words, start rolling at the velco end and roll it inwards.
                    Last edited by Kyzteke; May. 14, 2011, 10:26 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just and FYI, but Hilary Clayton DVM, has done a study on wraps and over heating tendons. Just beware that it can be a problem, especially in warm weather but even in cooler. Tendons need to cool off, exposing them to air is the best way. We see a lot of ligament issues with dressage horses as this may be part of it.

                      Sure use wraps when you are at a clinic but for every day it is best to ride without them.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank God for Kyzteke because now I don't have to explain running the 'tail' down the tendon after the downward wrapping and covering it with the upward winding.

                        Yes I, too, was a polo groom, but I also think it's a good thing in any discipline. It's never wrong to provide extra protection for a tendon.
                        ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
                        Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

                        "Life is merrier with a terrier!"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kryswyn View Post
                          Thank God for Kyzteke because now I don't have to explain running the 'tail' down the tendon after the downward wrapping and covering it with the upward winding.

                          Yes I, too, was a polo groom, but I also think it's a good thing in any discipline. It's never wrong to provide extra protection for a tendon.

                          Except that I believe it has been proven that polo wraps do nothing to provide support to the tendons. They will protect from a rap against it but no real support.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Bandages are not for support, they are to protect against rubs/hits (esp in lateral work), but w/o figure 8 they can slip. Just spiraling down and back up should only be used around (heavy) cottons, and easily slip if used with polos.
                            I.D.E.A. yoda

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by chancellor2 View Post
                              Except that I believe it has been proven that polo wraps do nothing to provide support to the tendons. They will protect from a rap against it but no real support.
                              They aren't supposed to support it. As I mentioned, the "tail" is for protection.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Love the tail

                                The tail is a great idea for protection and to use up "extra" wraps -- thanks!

                                As to "support" I have trouble thinking that any bandage or boot does more than protect from being whacked with a mallet or the opposite hoof.
                                http://behindthebitblog.com
                                Dressage, riding, sport horse blog
                                BTBbrowbands.com
                                Unique browbands for dressage and hunter riders

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  As a way to start out:
                                  When you wrap, count how many "arounds" you get. Then, see where the velcro winds up. THen, divide the number of "arounds" by two, and slightly adjust the starting point to get the velcro in a safe place.

                                  I get 5 down the leg, # 6 around the fetlock, and the next 5 up the leg.

                                  You can adjust the # of wraps by adjusting the degree of overlap, but be sure you overlap enough but not too much.

                                  L

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    not much there

                                    polos provide little, if any protection against a "rap" I have seen polos sliced through by a shod hoof; thus, I would never gallop or jump in them
                                    breeder of Mercury!

                                    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      SMboots

                                      This has been one of my objections to Sports Medicine boots; take them off a horse and notice how wet from sweat the leg is, in addition, the horses go better without them; Just and FYI, but Hilary Clayton DVM, has done a study on wraps and over heating tendons. Just beware that it can be a problem, especially in warm weather but even in cooler. Tendons need to cool off, exposing them to air is the best way. We see a lot of ligament issues with dressage horses as this may be part of it.
                                      breeder of Mercury!

                                      remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Carol Ames View Post
                                        polos provide little, if any protection against a "rap" I have seen polos sliced through by a shod hoof; thus, I would never gallop or jump in them
                                        Well, you better tell 1,000's of polo players that, 'cause that's what they use.

                                        And I assure you, they ARE galloping when they play the game.

                                        Perhaps that's why they still use polos, because they are much more absorbant and flexible than anything else I know of.

                                        And if you put them on right, they won't move. You can imagine the danger if one came lose during a game, so we learned to put them on well. First time one of your polos came lose, you had to buy the team a case of beer. Next time, your butt was out the door......

                                        I wouldn't trust them for cross country or going through water, but I've put them on my horses for jumping (free jumping through a chute) all the time....but then again, as I said, I've literally put on thousands of sets....

                                        As far as heat, the average pony plays an 7 min. chukker, mostly at a gallop (depending on the level of play); Unless the player told you otherwise, you kept the wraps on in case he needed to play the horse again, so those horses were standing in bandages for several hours.

                                        And many endurance riders use splint-type boots and ride some 50-100 miles in them, although they DO often pull them and hose the tendons down during vet checks.
                                        Last edited by Kyzteke; May. 13, 2011, 11:30 PM.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X