• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Improving Range of Motion in Hips

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Improving Range of Motion in Hips

    So I've been working really hard lately to improve my seat, and I read some tips about doing no-stirrup work and taking your leg completely off the horse (including inner thigh). Every time I attempt to do this, I feel a shooting pain starting in the lateral part of my hip and running down my thigh. I ease up and it takes a few seconds for the pain to fade. I'm blanking on the technical words to use right now. Anyways, it seems like I'm just overextending this muscle or something, so I was wondering if there are any exercises I can do to gain flexibility in my hips.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Quibbler View Post
    So I've been working really hard lately to improve my seat, and I read some tips about doing no-stirrup work and taking your leg completely off the horse (including inner thigh). Every time I attempt to do this, I feel a shooting pain starting in the lateral part of my hip and running down my thigh. I ease up and it takes a few seconds for the pain to fade. I'm blanking on the technical words to use right now. Anyways, it seems like I'm just overextending this muscle or something, so I was wondering if there are any exercises I can do to gain flexibility in my hips.
    Sounds like a tight or sore IT band.
    Don't lift your leg right off the saddle, just lighten it a bit and work up to lifting it.

    Lunges, use of one of those big balls you can sit on or lie on your back and roll the ball with your feet.

    There are a lot of stretches you can do to stretch an IT band.
    Look into a DVD set called Success in the Saddle by Debbie Rodriguez it has a lot of good core strength and limbering exercises.
    I think her website is SITS.com and she has a facebook page. I'll go there a look it up.
    edited to add; found it;
    http://www.successinthesaddle.com/SITS_Storefront_.html

    Oral HA supplements really help with that (yes they make em for humans as well) and also help you to be looser in other joints. PM me if you need more info on that.

    It can be hard getting those hips to loosen up esp if you are of urm more advanced years shall we say.

    Good Luck
    MW
    Last edited by Melyni; Jan. 14, 2011, 08:30 PM.
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks from me! I needed some advice on that as well!

      Comment


      • #4
        I was sent to "spine class" a few years ago when I was having trouble with my back. It was an awesome blend of group PT, pilates, yoga, strengthening and stretching stuff and made my hips feel great as well as helping my back. In my case, tight hamstrings were a major contributor to all the other problems. Maybe your HMO or local Y or fitness center has something similar?

        Short term, we have stools at our kitchen counter that are maybe 2'6" or so and I put one foot up on the stool and stretch every morning. I'm also learning that if I take ibuprofen before a lesson, I don't have to take it afterward.

        Rereading the original post, have someone watch you and be sure you're doing those exercises correctly. There are some ways our bodies just aren't meant to move!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by betsyk View Post
          I was sent to "spine class" a few years ago when I was having trouble with my back. It was an awesome blend of group PT, pilates, yoga, strengthening and stretching stuff and made my hips feel great as well as helping my back. In my case, tight hamstrings were a major contributor to all the other problems. !
          I'd second this suggestion - I too have back problems, and after trying "traditional medicine", I ran into a pilates instructor who was also a rider - and she's been helping me a lot. Tight hamstrings and tight shoulders are common problems with us desk jockeys

          Comment


          • #6
            Perhaps you could PM Medical Mike and draw his attention to this thread? I'm sure many of us would appreciate hearing his ideas.

            Comment


            • #7
              After my 3rd hip replacement, I continued to have pain so off to a chir/DO and after month or two I knew it was the IT band and the sciatic nerve. His manipulation and messages/pressure point treatments have been quite sucessful. I will always gave pain at sone time or another. but not the Tramedal/Vicadin type. Stretches that stretch the painful part work and strengthen.

              Comment


              • #8
                I do this stretch called "figure four" morning and evening, only taking it as far as feels like a comfortable stretch depending on how tight things feel.

                There are other great stretches too and what I have found is the key is being dedicated to doing them every single day.

                http://www.basic-yoga-information.co...re-4-pose.html
                Dappled Grey
                www.dappledgrey.com

                When you count your blessings, count your horse twice.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Thank you guys. I'm 17 and my legs have wonky issues - tight hamstrings and being pigeon-toed, for example. Not exactly ideal for a Dressage rider, but it's just a matter of pushing through it, since we all have issues that we need to overcome.

                  Sometimes it tightens up even when I'm doing normal trot work, but knowing that it's the IT band will definitely help. The stretches will be a good place to start, and in the future I plan on limbering up some more with Pilates and Yoga classes.

                  Good luck to the others struggling with this. I'll get Medical Mike on this topic, and hopefully other forum members can come up with other good stretches for us.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here is a good series of stretches for hips and legs: http://www.baliyoga.com/Hip%20Opening.pdf

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Have you tried a joint supplement?

                      Originally posted by Trying View Post
                      After my 3rd hip replacement, I continued to have pain so off to a chir/DO and after month or two I knew it was the IT band and the sciatic nerve. His manipulation and messages/pressure point treatments have been quite sucessful. I will always gave pain at sone time or another. but not the Tramedal/Vicadin type. Stretches that stretch the painful part work and strengthen.
                      Seriously, I also had some IT band issues, along with a few old injuries with adhesions. I started taking oral HA soln and it has made all the difference to my comfort and flexibility.
                      I'd humbly suggest you try some.
                      MW
                      Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
                      Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
                      New edition of book is out:
                      Horse Nutrition Handbook.

                      www.knabstruppers4usa.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I get a 'tighterning' or 'slow charlie horse' on the lateral part of my hip when riding. It is deep in there.
                        the one stretch that really hurts sooo good is this piniformis stretch (except I also push the opposite knee and it REALLY gets deep in my hip). I dont really have scatica pain, its in the sides of my hips.

                        http://www.ehow.com/video_4398858_pi...d-posture.html


                        weirdly enough my hips are the only joint in my body that is tight...the others are too loose. :/
                        Last edited by leslie645; Jan. 16, 2011, 05:02 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Few thoughts..........

                          Based on what you have posted, I'd say you are describing
                          "functional acetabular impingement." The pain pattern you describe is the referred pattern coming from the hip joint.

                          It is less likely only an overload to a hip abductor muscle.

                          IMO strengthening and an analysis of how you put your brake and go button on the horse, not stretches is the place to start.

                          Clearly your conformation is a major contributor and also needs to be analyzed, what a reasonable horse width would be, etc..

                          Leslie645,
                          That piriformis stretch "hurts so good" because you are, for lack of a better phrase, compacting the bone surfaces together, impinging the cartilage of the hip.

                          Hip impingement is not per say difficult to manage, however that is usually the best one can do.....MANAGE it. Optimal management is always done on a case by case basis.

                          Here is my general template. If you are interested in specifics' it is best to contact me through the website.

                          Rehab professionals for analysis of conformation and rough idea how involved the impingement is.

                          Measure your lower extremity length and figure out a 30 degree abduction angle.

                          No heels down, period and probably a more home foot..(rationale is hashed out over many threads if you are curious)

                          two position elbow/knee side plank.

                          Riding analysis to determine how you put your leg on/off the horse, looking for inefficiencies WITHIN your conformation. Ie. if you toed in say more than 10 degrees, having to turn your foot forward is probably not a good idea.

                          REgards,
                          medical Mike
                          equestrian medical researcher
                          www.equicision.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Maybe this had been mentioned but I am always amazed at how many people do not stretch before getting on the horse. You would stretch before a run or any other sport but so often people tack up and jump on the horse. I always stretch before I ride and it has made a huge difference. Even if I am in a hurry and do not have much time it makes a complete difference in my ride and I have found I ride much better plus it gives me a chance to focus and relax. Unless you ride 3 or more horses a day most of us probably only ride the one a day or only a couple times a week. Try stretching before you get on and then once you get on if your horse is quiet I promise you will feel the difference.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by le_dressage View Post
                              Maybe this had been mentioned but I am always amazed at how many people do not stretch before getting on the horse. You would stretch before a run or any other sport but so often people tack up and jump on the horse. I always stretch before I ride and it has made a huge difference. Even if I am in a hurry and do not have much time it makes a complete difference in my ride and I have found I ride much better plus it gives me a chance to focus and relax. Unless you ride 3 or more horses a day most of us probably only ride the one a day or only a couple times a week. Try stretching before you get on and then once you get on if your horse is quiet I promise you will feel the difference.
                              When I was the OP's age, our instructors always had us stretch at the beiginning of the ride. We'd drop the reins, at a walk, and do all sorts of stretches, literally from toes to top of the head! Then we'd keep doing some of those stretches at trot and even canter (such as, do the "frog" - find your ischions and raise your legs frog-like in front of you). VERY effective to find the correct/ most effective riding position.
                              The caveat is that you need a very quiet horse to do this!
                              Since my horse is far from quiet, I rely on Yoga and Pilates. If I go to class once a week, my lower back is happy and leaves me alone even after a tough flat / dressage lesson.
                              If I don't do Yoga once a week, my lower back starts hurting again.

                              When I started attending Pilates classes, I could not do the side leg lifts. My outside hip was literally screaming.
                              Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                You can also try a foam roller. It can be pretty painful to do if you are really tight but the different is amazing.

                                Here are some of the exercises:
                                http://runningtimes.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=9911
                                http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/f...FoamRoller.htm


                                I find if I start having a lot of pain somewhere-- usually my knees or my lower back-- it's because my muscles around the area are tight and knotted. Stretching definitely helps but the foam roller is much better IMO.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Get thee to a certified physical therapist. You can do harm "guessing" at what might be wrong and performing movements/stretches incorrectly. Your insurance will usually cover PT appts for an office visit copay per visit (usually something like $15) and it's well worth the time and effort.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    If just tight, pilates and yoga. See for example http://www.yoga4athletes.blogspot.com/

                                    If something wrong, find a good PT who understands sports medicine or a good sports medicine doc who works with a good PT
                                    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I am using a Balimo (BAlanceInMOtion) chair. It is helping me, not only increase the range of motion in my hips, but also to become more aligned and balanced. Supposedly it can strengthen your core too... Check out the video here: http://www.balimochairs.com/about/uses-applications/

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        The Balimo chair was designed for the equestrian world to help with things like this. I am not a doctor but do use the Balimo and it is amazing as to what it can do for the body. You can get a free DVD if you go to balimochairs.com and either call or email and you can get one. This will explain what Balimo can do for you.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X