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This is why I hate riding when horses are being lunged!

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  • This is why I hate riding when horses are being lunged!

    You just never know what can happen!
    http://www.eurodressage.com/equestri...nging-accident
    "I'm holding out for the $100,000 Crossrail Classic in 2012." --mem
    "With all due respect.. may I suggest you take up Croquet?" --belambi
    Proud Member of the Opinionated Redhead Club!

  • #2
    Wow, just shows how unpredictable that horses can be! Scary
    Truly unique saddle pads, custom available too!

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    • #3
      Accidents can happen anywhere, anytime, anyplace…even if there is nobody else riding in the arena at all. As far as I’m concerned, if I am riding my horse in the arena while someone else is lunging, it is MY job to control my own horse and stay out of their way. If I am incapable of doing so safely, then my ass shouldn’t even be in there in the first place. Likewise, I expect that the person lunging actually knows how to do so safely. But even in the best case and with the most experienced riders, obviously, sh*t happens. It’s a shame that this particular accident happened, but it’s just part of what we deal with when riding and owning horses.
      "I was not expecting the park rangers to lead the resistance, none of the dystopian novels I read prepared me for this but cool."

      Comment


      • #4
        well, i guess you can say that but accidents happen. If I never road my horse when horses were lunging, I would never get a horse worked. And vise versa, our horses have to learn right quick that lunging is not an excuse to drag themselves and their handler all over the ring, getting in everyone's way. i guess that's the beauty of breed shows. You are kind of forced to gun up and get out there among the fray of the warm up ring. You or your horse isn't ready for that, you ride in the wee hours when the ring is quieter.

        That does totally suck. I feel horrible for her and the rider that t boned her horse. Talk about guilt! Totally Tanya Harding!
        ...don't sh** where you eat...

        Comment


        • #5
          I may be reading the article wrong but it doesn't sound like it was a longeing accident at all. Sounds like she brought the horse in the arena, warned people she was going to longe and another horse spooked and jumped into her before she could even start longeing.

          In my opinion, longeing accidents are, as a majority, the handler's fault. If a horse is taught to longe, strike that, behave, properly then you're way less likely to have an accident. It's when you get the people who feel that longeing is a way to let your horse blow off steam and the horse is running around bucking on the line totally out of control that the accidents happen. Those types of handlers and horses are also going to be the ones who cause accidents in the barn aisle, while on the horse's back, etc.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by asuits View Post

            In my opinion, longeing accidents are, as a majority, the handler's fault. If a horse is taught to longe, strike that, behave, properly then you're way less likely to have an accident. It's when you get the people who feel that longeing is a way to let your horse blow off steam and the horse is running around bucking on the line totally out of control that the accidents happen. Those types of handlers and horses are also going to be the ones who cause accidents in the barn aisle, while on the horse's back, etc.
            I disagree. I don't think one can guarantee a horse's actions when it's 15-20 feet away from the handler. I do not ever allow my horse to blow off steam on the lunge. She walks, and when she's warmed up, trots. But every once in a while, as happened last night, she explodes. I quickly got her back in hand and we worked until she relaxed, and then I sent her back out. There was another rider, but she kept to the other end of the arena while we worked out the kinks.

            But riders who cut too close are taking a big risk, IMHO. Any horse, regardless of training, can cut loose with a kick or buck. They are big, unpredictable animals with their own minds, and need to be respected as such, regardless of training.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by stryder View Post
              I disagree. I don't think one can guarantee a horse's actions when it's 15-20 feet away from the handler. I do not ever allow my horse to blow off steam on the lunge. She walks, and when she's warmed up, trots. But every once in a while, as happened last night, she explodes. I quickly got her back in hand and we worked until she relaxed, and then I sent her back out. There was another rider, but she kept to the other end of the arena while we worked out the kinks.

              But riders who cut too close are taking a big risk, IMHO. Any horse, regardless of training, can cut loose with a kick or buck. They are big, unpredictable animals with their own minds, and need to be respected as such, regardless of training.
              It doesn't matter whether the horse is on the longe or under saddle. Everything that you have said is true, but it applies equally to ridden and longed horses.
              "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller

              Comment


              • #8
                Agree with eclectic.

                Accidents happen, horses explode or let loose sometimes. They're animals, not robots. My main Thoroughbred gelding, when I permitted him a hand gallop down the long side, let loose a little exuberantly on our last ride. Hey, he wasn't getting the exercise he needed out on pasture due to the poor footing (ice and snow) and I had been away at work for 2 weeks - you can't blame him for excess energy. The other rider in the arena at the time just laughed at his joyful expression. Sometimes horses do the same on the longe. I do not feel it is any less or more vital that a horse do or not do it on the longe than u/s - it depends on the individual owner and their perspective and ideals etc. At our barn, if a horse spooks, bucks, plays, whatever may be, whether it is on the ground or u/s, we take it in stride. Sh!t happens. Personally, my horses ARE allowed to play on the ground and u/s, within reason and keeping in mind respect to other riders in the arena. You can NEVER guarantee a horse's actions 100 percent. You can work with them in such a way that their actions are safe and relatively predictable, however you cannot control their every breath or movement.

                Besides, this was not a longeing accident anyways (the horse was not yet being longed) and it certainly was not a case of a horse being longed getting out of hand (in fact, it was the other way around). Sh!t happens.
                ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
                ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
                  It doesn't matter whether the horse is on the longe or under saddle. Everything that you have said is true, but it applies equally to ridden and longed horses.
                  You are correct, of course. A lot of people say, "My horse won't ...... (insert bad behavior here) and I always think, "Maybe, but will I bet my life on it?"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Duh. At my barn riding and longeing don't mix. If you are going to ride, there's no longeing. If you are longeing, there's no riding. Simple.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ouch! I am always very careful where I lunge my horse and who is around. I also think it was just one of those accidental oh sh*t moments that happen.
                      "Promise me you'll always remember: your braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think." By Christopher Robins to Pooh

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                      • #12
                        What a bunch of DQs...oh, wait, that's redundant. We are on the Dressage board after all.

                        Seriously, if people couldn't lunge at the stables I've been at over the years, horses would not be worked and many would not be safe for their owners to ride.

                        You lunge at one end and give the riders on the rail plenty of room. If you have a young or explosive horse, you warn the riders and let them know so that they can choose to leave if they are worried their porcelain horse is going to have a meltdown. Honestly, if the person riding says they have a young horse or are worried about their safety because you have a horse that is young or about to be naughty, you let them finish up and then you come back. (You don't want the two of them feeding off each other. That's a recipe for disaster.)

                        If you have a well behaved horse, you let them choose to leave if they feel insecure. You do NOT crack the whip when other people are riding. That's just not kosher. You CAN get after your horse as long as you can keep him/her at their end of the ring and you warn the riders.

                        My only pet peeve are the morons. I recently had one at a barn who loved to think she had ownership of the entire end of the ring with a well behaved horse who lunged like a gentlemen. She would let him take over the rail or crowd horses that were being ridden, and her circle moved without her ever looking at where the other riders were in the arena (meaning it drifted toward the middle of the ring).

                        Honestly, we can all get along. A bit of courtesy, a little less DQ attitude (it's really not ALL about you), and a lot better horsemanship is what's required to get along.

                        It has already been pointed out that accidents happen and horses can be unpredictable. If you're afraid of that part of the horse world, then you might want to quit now. Trust me, at horse shows it's often worse. Horse are, by nature, dangerous. That really is the nature of our beasts. Sure, some people make excuses for bad horses, just as others do for bad riding. It's all part of the horse world. You really have to learn to deal with it or leave it. (Or take your millions of dollars and build your own Mecca for horses where you can ride alone. )
                        "And I'm thinking you weren't burdened with an overabundance of schooling." - Capt Reynolds "Firefly"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Spyder View Post
                          Duh. At my barn riding and longeing don't mix. If you are going to ride, there's no longeing. If you are longeing, there's no riding. Simple.
                          Our barn is too busy for that. Two people can longe at a time. There can be other riders, but people really need to work together and keep communication clear. No longeing during lessons. If there are riders in the arena and one longer, the second longer has to wait.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            To add to what Velvet said:

                            At our barn, whips are sometimes cracked, horses are barrel raced while I am working dressage, some horses act up or are obviously under duress (which green and young or inexperienced or undeveloped horses do pick up on), sometimes steers are in the arena and being roped, and riders and horses do what riders and horses do (clearly we are a very multidiscipline facility). We are all respectful of one another and even the recent barrel racer worked seemlessly with my working my 4yo mare dressage (and actually showing her to a potential client at the time!), much to my surprise - the barrel racer was extremely respectful though and we were able to work together! Young riders I find are inclined to make mistakes and have less control but I am an experienced rider and as such am able to easily guide my horses (from green to experienced) around any potential chaos or general busy-ness.

                            Guess what. HORSES ACCLIMATIZE. I usually start a number of young horses in the spring and *gasp* life goes on and people do not change their riding so as to accommodate me. Sometimes I am riding a green or spooky horse while steers are being roped at one end. Or sometimes I am riding a green and sensitive horse who is eyeing up the wp horse being choked down by heavy bit and tie-down and obviously upset, OR, I'm riding my green-ish 4yo Thoroughbred mare while someone is practising barrels - a first for this mare to see at that time. If you expose your horse to a variety of circumstances they a) gain confidence in themselves b) gain confidence in your leadership and c) become generally prepared and "bombproof". That way, when you take horse out in the fields or out to a show, they don't jump at the first bang or tarp or spooked horse or whatnot. It doesn't take much for a horse to become relaxed and acclimatized or desensitized to various intrusions, especially if the rider or handler is calm and relaxed themselves! If you're not comfortable, GET OFF! Acclimatize your horse to the situation on the ground first, then re-mount if you'd like; I have done it numerous times on a freshly green horse before. Once the horse was okay, I re-mounted and we continued. Had the horse not been okay, we would have done groundwork, made progress, and maybe called it a day until next session, chalking it up to a great experience. We may not have accomplished exactly what we wanted that day but we took advantage of a different opportunity. Heck, I seek out such opportunities and will even take a green or inexperienced horse into the barn on a night I know the boys are roping and just sit and watch with said horse so they become desensitized. That's just me though but I expect others to at least have tolerance for various situations.

                            If you can't handle it, move to a barn where your very narrow-minded views are also observed. That's what I did - I moved to a multidiscipline barn where the horses are not made of porcelain

                            ETA: that is not to say that anyone longeing or otherwise should not be respectful of course. For example, if you know your horse is a bad actor, there are ways of working around other riders or longe'ers etc in a respectful manner. There is always room for tolerance and respect on both ends and to accomodate one another. I just don't think it's the end of the world if sh!t happens though is all.
                            ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
                            ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm running into some lunging safety issues right now. Since it is winter and everyone is inside it is always busy, but I have a very green horse who lunges fairly well but is unpredictable. She almost kicked another mare the other day. Now I go to the barn at like 8 p.m. Annoying, but safety sometimes is. On the other hand, it is interesting that this horse basically got hurt from bucking...something she has probably done safely hundreds of times in her life. Major bad luck...

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Our covered arena is about the length of and slightly narrower than a standard large dressage court. The rule re lungeing is: One horse being ridden, you may lunge; two or more being ridden, no lungeing, you wait until they are finished. *shrug* My horse is young and silly. I squelch bad behavior on the lunge, but I can't stop the first leap/bolt (I'm not psychic!).

                                A few months ago, the BO did pull me aside and say that one of our boarders - who is a timid, older rider - was afraid to ride while I was lungeing my horse. I responded that had she said something to me, I would have waited to lunge, or done ground work, or whatever until she was done. I also pointed out that I rarely lunged now that my horse is a bit older, and I usually do wait until there is no one or only one rider in the arena AND I warn them he might act up a little (if he comes leading up to the arena on tippy toe and high blowing!!!LOL)

                                Now, this can be inconvenient sometimes, because I ride in the evening, and much as I love my horse and riding, I don't want to be at the barn all evening, but hey, the arena is small and I'd expect the same consideration from others. With my old horse, who was bombproof and dead quiet, other boarders had no qualms about riding around my lungeing circle and I would bring him in and away from them as they passed, but the new guy - not so much - so I accommodate them and they try to accommodate me. Just ordinary courtesy. Not so much in supply at DQ barns?

                                I will comment that I sure wasn't very happy when I went to a show at a VERY BIG DQ BARN, and found people who were not showing or riding lungeing in the warmup at 8AM, cracking their whips, etc. while the the Intro/Training Level horses were warming up - despite the fact that there were two separate lunge arenas and one of the Euro-exercisers available. *shrug*

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Spyder, you're joking right... at our barn, we have a saying when a rider gets a little tentative about what she or her horse can handle. We say, "You can't ride in a bubble"

                                  get brave and learned to live with the reality of distraction, people. And are you saying that if the rider had walked in with the horse undersaddle but wasn't mounted yet, say adjusting her stirrups, and the other horse had run into her, would that mean riders shouldn't ride with any other horses in the arena at all? Come on, that's not realistic nor good for horse and rider to always ride under perfectly cryogenic conditions.
                                  ...don't sh** where you eat...

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by naturalequus View Post
                                    To add to what Velvet said:

                                    At our barn, whips are sometimes cracked, horses are barrel raced while I am working dressage, some horses act up or are obviously under duress (which green and young or inexperienced or undeveloped horses do pick up on), sometimes steers are in the arena and being roped, and riders and horses do what riders and horses do (clearly we are a very multidiscipline facility). We are all respectful of one another and even the recent barrel racer worked seemlessly with my working my 4yo mare dressage (and actually showing her to a potential client at the time!), much to my surprise - the barrel racer was extremely respectful though and we were able to work together! Young riders I find are inclined to make mistakes and have less control but I am an experienced rider and as such am able to easily guide my horses (from green to experienced) around any potential chaos or general busy-ness.

                                    Guess what. HORSES ACCLIMATIZE. I usually start a number of young horses in the spring and *gasp* life goes on and people do not change their riding so as to accommodate me. Sometimes I am riding a green or spooky horse while steers are being roped at one end. Or sometimes I am riding a green and sensitive horse who is eyeing up the wp horse being choked down by heavy bit and tie-down and obviously upset, OR, I'm riding my green-ish 4yo Thoroughbred mare while someone is practising barrels - a first for this mare to see at that time. If you expose your horse to a variety of circumstances they a) gain confidence in themselves b) gain confidence in your leadership and c) become generally prepared and "bombproof". That way, when you take horse out in the fields or out to a show, they don't jump at the first bang or tarp or spooked horse or whatnot. It doesn't take much for a horse to become relaxed and acclimatized or desensitized to various intrusions, especially if the rider or handler is calm and relaxed themselves! If you're not comfortable, GET OFF! Acclimatize your horse to the situation on the ground first, then re-mount if you'd like; I have done it numerous times on a freshly green horse before. Once the horse was okay, I re-mounted and we continued. Had the horse not been okay, we would have done groundwork, made progress, and maybe called it a day until next session, chalking it up to a great experience. We may not have accomplished exactly what we wanted that day but we took advantage of a different opportunity. Heck, I seek out such opportunities and will even take a green or inexperienced horse into the barn on a night I know the boys are roping and just sit and watch with said horse so they become desensitized. That's just me though but I expect others to at least have tolerance for various situations.

                                    If you can't handle it, move to a barn where your very narrow-minded views are also observed. That's what I did - I moved to a multidiscipline barn where the horses are not made of porcelain

                                    ETA: that is not to say that anyone longeing or otherwise should not be respectful of course. For example, if you know your horse is a bad actor, there are ways of working around other riders or longe'ers etc in a respectful manner. There is always room for tolerance and respect on both ends and to accomodate one another. I just don't think it's the end of the world if sh!t happens though is all.
                                    Very good post. I ride all my horses (after the first 30 days under saddle) in the pasture with grazing horses and when equipment is being used around the place. I have to go out of my way to find people to ride with but that is just due to the tyranny of distance.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I think it all comes down to common courtesy. If I need to lunge a horse that might act up a bit and I see a rider who I would consider timid or a rider on a young horse, I wait or I ask. That is just me. If I am on my young horse, that is the courtesy I would hope for (but do not always expect or get). Some people get it, some people don't. If someone lunges anyway and there horse is going nuts and my horse is getting explosive I have to make a decision. Do I feel like I can ride through it or should I get off. It is especially hard in the winter when a sudden drop in temperature makes the horses frisky.
                                      I can not control what other people do. In the end, I am responsible for the safety of myself and my horse because if something happens to myself or my horse I am the one who suffers the consequence. If there is someone who I think is unsafe (or an idiot) lunging...I leave. Better to ride another day. We have one lady whose horse routinely gets away from her and goes careening around the ring trailing the lunge line. When I see her I just leave. It is not worth it. I would wish she would clue it but it has not happened yet and getting upset or angry every time I see her is just exhausting. For me it is easier to shrug my shoulders and just walk away (saying a silent prayer for those remaining in the ring).

                                      I think it is also important to note Imke makes it clear that she does not hold the other rider responsible. It was an accident and, as someone pointed out, I don't think she had even begun to lunge. She was just telling the riders she was going to lunge when the accident happened.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Guess what. HORSES ACCLIMATIZE. I usually start a number of young horses in the spring and *gasp* life goes on and people do not change their riding so as to accommodate me.
                                        Originally posted by winfieldfarm View Post
                                        at our barn, we have a saying when a rider gets a little tentative about what she or her horse can handle. We say, "You can't ride in a bubble"
                                        Within reason this is all true. But ...

                                        I board one horse at a large (120+ horses) multi-use barn -- we have working western, roping, dressage and breed show enthusiasts. But most people are recreational riders -- some quite competent and others, not so much.

                                        This time of year, the indoor can get very interesting. The horse I ride is well trained, but can get pretty hot when the weather is cold. *I* can deal with him just fine. But I don't think it's fair to tell the less competent folks to man up and deal with his shenanigans just because I think they should be able to.

                                        Originally posted by Liz View Post
                                        I think it all comes down to common courtesy. If I need to lunge a horse that might act up a bit and I see a rider who I would consider timid or a rider on a young horse, I wait or I ask. That is just me. If I am on my young horse, that is the courtesy I would hope for (but do not always expect or get). Some people get it, some people don't.


                                        Maybe it's because I used to be a timid rider, but I always err on the side of courtesy (and safety). I ask riders if they're OK with my horse being a little fresh, if I need to longe him. 90% of the time it's OK. But if someone says "no" then I'll either go outside to let him get his yayas out or do in-hand work.

                                        I also have no problem kindly reminding riders (competent or not) of what constitutes arena courtesy -- left to left, don't ride too close, don't cut off people. It's all about sharing, folks. Really.
                                        __________________________
                                        "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
                                        the best day in ten years,
                                        you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."

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