• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

How do you (mentally) deal w/ the training process?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How do you (mentally) deal w/ the training process?

    Gah.

    I am needing advice or just a friendly sympathetic ear on how to manage the mental/emotional part of the training process, LOL. Let's be clear, I'm in it as much as she is. We are working with a fantastic trainer, someone who truly challenges us but brings out our best we both didn't know we had.

    My mare, a green bean, and I have embarked down the Golden Pathway. She was green when I got her, full of potential. She still is both of those things. As we learn sometimes we it feels like we take 1 step forward to go 3 backwards, temporarily forget to do what we've learned for the sake of learning something else, knowing it'll get put back together later. I know the end result will be good, I've seen it happen time and again, I can already feel the positive in our own journey too.

    But the bumps in the road...yes, the bumps- how do you deal with them? When you are not in the saddle, sitting at work, wondering what you should do about it, if anything, or when it'll change?
    My blog: Change of Pace - Retraining a standardbred via dressage

  • #2
    Remember training is not a linear process. It's more like a drunken stumble with lots of circles. Horses have bad hair days just like people. It's important to stay focused on the big picture. That's why I find blogging so satisfying, or you could just keep a training journal. Because then you look back and go "OMG, four years ago, we couldn't canter on the longeline without horse bolting away in terror and in the past year, our event scores in the dressage arena went from 55 to 35." Just keep chanting, big picture, BIG PICTURE.
    Life doesn't have perfect footing.

    Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
    We Are Flying Solo

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a mantra. "I want to compete and grow with this horse for the next 12 years." I repeat it to myself regularly - and most often when I realize we've worked as much as he should be working that day and he throws a hissy fit over feeling it is NOT enough and we shouldn't stop yet.

      I'm the most type A, driven person I know... but have been outdone by my horse's work ethic. It's a bizarre world.

      (Why 12 years? He's 8, and I figure by 20 years old he might just feel ready to retire from the show ring, even if he isn't willing to actually retire. Maybe then he can become a schoolmaster at whatever level we've gotten through.)
      If Kim Kardashian wants to set up a gofundme to purchase the Wu Tang album from Martin Shkreli, guess what people you DON'T HAVE TO DONATE.
      -meupatdoes

      Comment


      • #4
        What I usually do is the next few times I tack up and ride my goal for the ride is to work on relaxation. Something good usually pops up during these rides, and guide me again.

        Or work on something simple that you both do well, so you leave with a positive note.

        You will be learning ALOT of patience. Re-evaluate monthy instead of daily-giving yourself a longer timeframe to reach each goal.

        Comment


        • #5
          think about how you yourself learn. you are not able to get everything everytime something new is taught.

          and also horses learn so so differently that us. it might really help you to look into horse learning psychology.

          horses are very literal. and they can and will learn the wrong thing is your timing is off.

          i am finding clicker training fascinating because it really shows how timing is so critical.

          so training will have bumps and steps forwards and backwards - it is natural. but each step should be LOGICAL to the horse. if the horse is showing signs of confusion, resistance etc it is time to look at how you are teaching him.

          also, dont put emotional baggage on your training. but DO pay attention to whether you are progressing easily. if not it might be time to rethink what you are doing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hack. When you get to a point where you are frusterated and seem to pick more fights then anything else, just hack.

            You and your horse will feel better and good chances are that tomorrow you will be in a better mental place to have a positive ride

            Then go have a glass of wine LMAO
            Concordia means "Harmony" in Latin.
            Full Time Dressage Addict

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wildlifer View Post
              It's more like a drunken stumble with lots of circles.
              I'm so going to have to borrow that
              ______________________________
              The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

              Comment


              • #8
                Just try to stay positive, and believe that you will get to where you want in time. Training is hard it is not for cowards you throw your heart out there and you think that you are doing everything right and it still it does not work. Then one day the clouds part and you have the best ride ever. And that friends is why we do it we get off on the days that we have the best ride ever.
                Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death.
                -Auntie Mame

                Comment


                • #9
                  I remember how in the end, every single one of them got trained and trained well. It helps to have a track record LOL
                  "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                  ---
                  The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've recently been having the same frustrations. But tonight, we rode for 20 minutes, and I just concentrated on hoe far we've come in the past 4.5 months. Its not been long, but when you celebrate your successes - even if they're not perfection - you can appreciate how far you HAVE made it.

                    For example - when I got my boy in April, we could not steer well, pick up the canter, trot without our head way up in the air (I mean, picking my nose with his ears), and steering was iffy.

                    Tonight, we tried a training level test with prompt transitions and a LONG frame. Will it win us any awards? Not bloody likely! But being able to ride down and out to the bit, instead of short and high is something I'm realizing I need to cherish.

                    Remember that even if you have a long way to go, you've already started down the path...even if only a little ways. Look back and celebrate the small victories.
                    Here Be Dragons: My blog about venturing beyond the lower levels as a dressage amateur.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Lots of good advice given here. A clinician I recently worked with emphasized the importance of variety in the work. Like hacking out. Incorporating hill work to help strengthen the horse. Jumping, if that's in the cards for you. Trot poles.

                      Grinding away at training day after day can be frustrating, and you can't see the forest for the trees. That "long view" suggestion is super. Two years ago my gelding was just beginning to recover from a back injury that ended his jumping career. I spent the first year doing nothing but rehab. His rear end was atrophied, he couldn't track up, and he had no brakes.

                      Last year he placed 5th in both Training and First Level Open at our GMO's championships.

                      This year, we've qualified for our GMO championships at 2nd Level.

                      Take the time to look back over the last 6 or 12 months and see how far you've come. Think about the things that were difficult back then that seem easy now. Also, don't judge your progress by what others are doing or where you think you SHOULD be. Everyone, horse & human, learns and grows at their own pace.

                      Be patient with yourself and your horse and enjoy the journey!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wait, did I write the original post in my sleep, lol? I just bought a green bean as well. Once, I had three days in a row that I could do wtc - three days! Awesome. The next day, I couldn't get beyond trot. Oh, but we did our walk/trot transitions well! I also have the support of my family, friends, and a great trainer. That helps more than anything - they are all there to remind me of how far she's come, better days are ahead, onward and upward. So that's my message to you - better days are ahead, onward and upward.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post
                          I remember how in the end, every single one of them got trained and trained well. It helps to have a track record LOL


                          Do you keep a journal?

                          For me, it was CRUCIAL to keep one with my stallion. For *me* life kept interfering. Family illness, personal injury & illness, job crap... etc.

                          So I'd really angst about where we weren't, and forget how much farther we WERE than we had been.

                          When I could look back a couple of months, or a year, I'd realise just how far we HAD come, rather than be depressed at the last week's progress or lack thereof.

                          I also will tack up with a jumping saddle and go running & leaping... or throw on western tack and play cowpony when I am too mentally discouraged. The horse certainly knows the difference in the tack, and the 'play break' for both of us helps.

                          *I *hate* trails, but I suppose if you like them, that's an option too. I only do them because I have to for the horse's fitness and freshness. If I never had to go on a trail again, I'd be happy though. )

                          More often than not, time off from training (whether that is completely off riding, or just doing other things) is beneficial. It's like they let everything simmer in their brain, and figure out how to do it.
                          InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                          Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am not a journal keeper so no.

                            I've pretty much just stopped thinking about the end product. I don't show anymore so maybe that why but I don't think so. It's just... Straighten. Bend. Go. Stop. Do more of each thing, better, quicker. It's a nice place to be in, not worrying about their progress. Just riding the horse underneath me that day.

                            It's always interesting tho, I don't mean it to sound like I'm an automaton up there. Just this evening one of mine intimated to me that he would appreciate it if I watched my left thigh a bit closer, that it was adding to some confusion in the lateral work. It tends to hold a little. I'm not even exactly sure how the idea got thru but it was a lot of fun.
                            "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                            ---
                            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ya do the best you can with what is under your fanny at that given moment in time.................
                              Bethe Mounce
                              Head Trainer, AmeriCan Romance Equestrian
                              https://www.facebook.com/AmericanRomanceEquestrian
                              Brentwood CA

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by wildlifer View Post
                                Remember training is not a linear process. It's more like a drunken stumble with lots of circles. Horses have bad hair days just like people. It's important to stay focused on the big picture. That's why I find blogging so satisfying, or you could just keep a training journal. Because then you look back and go "OMG, four years ago, we couldn't canter on the longeline without horse bolting away in terror and in the past year, our event scores in the dressage arena went from 55 to 35." Just keep chanting, big picture, BIG PICTURE.
                                Agree totally!
                                Now in Kentucky

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Expect nothing. Always.

                                  Expectations lead to frustrations. Live in the moment. Deal with each issue as it comes and realize you might have to fix the same thing a few times before it really gets etched into the horse's brain.

                                  Some days they're brilliant and you don't want to get off. Then there are other days you wish you had never gotten on in the first place. I try to be creative for the latter one and mix up their routine if I can tell they're going to be a bit bonkers (long line, lunge, trail, light hack, etc). The other thing with young horses is that everything falls under the category of "training" even if all you do is work on getting them used to something scary.

                                  The best part about showing is having definable bench marks to which to track your progress. A year is both a very short, and very long period of time. Horses will teach you patience if nothing else.

                                  Don't worry. All made horses start out green.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post

                                    I've pretty much just stopped thinking about the end product. I don't show anymore so maybe that why but I don't think so. It's just... Straighten. Bend. Go. Stop. Do more of each thing, better, quicker. It's a nice place to be in, not worrying about their progress. Just riding the horse underneath me that day.

                                    Don't think about how it *should* be, think about how it is, this day, this moment, this step in time.
                                    Read my sig line... it works
                                    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
                                    chaque pas est fait ensemble

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      The right foot helps me immensily!

                                      I get on, and I sit for a moment and make sure that we are ready. I walk around, check all of my aids, do some circles, stop in the center and check out other riders. (mental note the pinto is kinda out of control today)

                                      We usually have a full arena so I really like to check out what problem riders (young, or on young horses) there are.

                                      Then I see if my horse will stand on a long rein or if he is up today. Depends on his mood. Is he quick off of the leg or lazy?

                                      Is he flexing or kinda heavy?

                                      Is he tense? Am I tense?

                                      Am I sitting balanced?

                                      Could my hands be more towards the mouth?

                                      Just preparing for my day helps me tremendously. Plus it curbs my appetite for too much pressure on my horse (who is sensative).
                                      ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
                                      http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        If it not a hack day, I start with my regular work up routine-Forward, Bend , change direction, more forward, usually in a longish frame. When things feel right we go for a little more roundness, a little more engagement.

                                        From there we figure out where the day will go.

                                        Always have a plan!

                                        Never cast it in stone!!!!! The more years you spend at this,the more you learn to make haste, slowly.
                                        Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                                        Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X