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Anyone use Perfect Prep products?

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  • Anyone use Perfect Prep products?

    The back story is that my awesome 6 yo gelding just wrapped up his first show season. Typically we are there 3 days--the day before the show starts we get there and warm up, 2 classes each weekend day, and then go home. At home, this horse is a willing but push ride, and is often ridden in an open 3 acre field as well as haul in lessons weekly. He's a gem. At shows he is great for the day we get there (he isn't terribly reactive or spooky), day 2 he's "up" but it's useful, and by day 3 he's a hot mess--kite on a string. He has no physical issues and I proactively treat for ulcers before shows. I think he just gets stir crazy--at home he has a 15' by 15' stall but it's come/go as he pleases. At shows they are 10' by 10' most places and of course no turnout. He eats his grain normally but does not eat a lot of hay--he's too busy watching what's going on, but doesn't pace or scream a lot. Someone recommended the Perfect Prep products and they seem to have "acute use" products that aren't given all the time--he's already mellow at home so I don't want him more laid back except at shows.

    I'm hoping this will fix itself as he ages/seasons and gets more shows under his belt. But if I can help him to be more settled or something in the meantime I am up for it.
    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

  • #2
    I tried it with a nervous gelding who wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole... My trainer has used it on a few of her horses, with varying degrees of success.

    I think like most "calming" products -- as many folks swear by it, it does at least "not much" for the rest. Mag Ox is the main ingredient (as well as rice bran, brewers yeast...) and any of those can be procured much more cheaply than a nearly $90/month dose.

    Comment


    • #3
      If he’s not eating much hay at shows, you might wanna up your game in the ulcer treatments (not just preventative). What do you give him usually and when/how?

      Second, he might be sleep deprived. My mare loves her « privacy curtains ». She’s quite territorial and doesn’t like invaders. She truly prefers to be behind closed doors and she sleeps like she’s at home; 4 legs stretches out and proudly snores big n’ loud.
      - I put drapes on the door (above) and/or on the sides, so cannot spy on/guard anyone.

      Third, active but quiet hand walk for at least 20 minutes. Every day as a show routine. Where you both can relax and warm up.

      Fourth, don’t over warm up on day 3. Mainly walk.
      Friday : hand walk 20 min. Walk warm up 15 min+ w/t/c + practice : 15 min. = 50min.
      Saturday : Hand walk 20 min. Walk warm up 15 + w/t/c both sides 5 min = 40min.
      If something goes awry, correct for a moment and just walk.

      People tend to do too much at shows, because of nerves, wanting to be perfect, horse should know better..., but if you want things to be quiet, you need to be quiet as well.
      Relaxation is the first step of the training scale.

      Fifth, there is nothing wrong in giving Perfect Prep. It’s the L-Tryptophan, the Magnesium and the B1 that are used as calming agent. I would gave Miss Mare her straight B1 powder and she would lick it to no ends.
      It did help. a lot. Not just her.
      Honestly, in her case, it did made a good difference.
      Some horses don’t react the same to all the products available.
      ~ Enjoying some guac and boxed wine at the Blue Saddle inn. ~

      Originally posted by LauraKY
      I'm sorry, but this has "eau de hoarder" smell all over it.
      HORSING mobile training app

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      • #4
        How are you treating for ulcers? I agree that it still sounds like that's the most likely issue.
        __________________________________
        Flying F Sport Horses
        Horses in the NW

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        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by alibi_18 View Post
          If he’s not eating much hay at shows, you might wanna up your game in the ulcer treatments (not just preventative). What do you give him usually and when/how?

          He is on a generic omeprazole every day. A few days before the shows I switch to Ulcergard. He nibbles hay, but just isn't the biggest eater in general. Over the course of this past show (Thursday afternoon through Sunday early morning when we left) he ate about ⅔ of a bale of orchard grass hay and ½ bale of alfalfa which I mix together in his net.

          Second, he might be sleep deprived. My mare loves her « privacy curtains ». She’s quite territorial and doesn’t like invaders. She truly prefers to be behind closed doors and she sleeps like she’s at home; 4 legs stretches out and proudly snores big n’ loud.
          - I put drapes on the door (above) and/or on the sides, so cannot spy on/guard anyone.

          You may be on to something here, although I doubt stall drapes would work. He never lays down at shows (as the night watch people can attest to...). In fact, I've owned him 1.5 years and have never seen him lay down. I'm sure he does out in the field, but I've never seen it. He is very gregarious though, and I've never seen him lay back his ears, and he is comforted by the horses around. I think stall drapes would make him feel isolated and alone.

          Third, active but quiet hand walk for at least 20 minutes. Every day as a show routine. Where you both can relax and warm up.

          Fourth, don’t over warm up on day 3. Mainly walk.
          Friday : hand walk 20 min. Walk warm up 15 min+ w/t/c + practice : 15 min. = 50min.
          Saturday : Hand walk 20 min. Walk warm up 15 + w/t/c both sides 5 min = 40min.
          If something goes awry, correct for a moment and just walk.

          People tend to do too much at shows, because of nerves, wanting to be perfect, horse should know better..., but if you want things to be quiet, you need to be quiet as well.
          Relaxation is the first step of the training scale.

          He gets hand walked and grazed at the shows at least 3-4 times each day plus the riding. By the last day at this last show (the Region 1 Finals), he was dangerous to walk first thing in the morning. He had no regard for me at all (which is totally not him or his personality). I put him on the lunge for 15 min (just trot at liberty) and then he was calm enough to walk around. Regarding the training aspect, my coach and I have that covered--we adjust our plan according to his needs regarding balancing relaxation/reducing tension with getting work done and I am a capable, quiet rider. This is my horse's first show season and he is just so different from EVERY other horse I've campaigned in the past. But it is far from my first rodeo. 😉

          Fifth, there is nothing wrong in giving Perfect Prep. It’s the L-Tryptophan, the Magnesium and the B1 that are used as calming agent. I would gave Miss Mare her straight B1 powder and she would lick it to no ends.
          It did help. a lot. Not just her.
          Honestly, in her case, it did made a good difference.
          Some horses don’t react the same to all the products available.
          From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's worth a shot. I saw it make a real difference for one horse, no real effect on any others. Given the progression, I'd up your turnout-replacement. In addition to basically unlimited hand grazing time based on my schedule, one of mine used to get at least 2 30 minute marching walks, and 2 lunges.

            Comment


            • #7
              Is this a pony? How much hay does he normally consume over the same span of time at home? How does that compare to what he ate at this away show?

              A little over 1 bale of hay over ~3 days worth of feeding does not seem even close to enough forage feed unless this is a small 13.0 pony.

              I think understanding this might be a big chunk of your answer. Is he normally fed out of a hay net at home? Maybe try just free feeding on the floor instead. A empty stomach will make more horses cranky and omeprazole can't counteract a empty stomach. It will lessen the amount of acid but a tum full of smaller amount of acid is still a tum full of acid.

              My young horse at her first away show had hay in front of her constantly and I would refresh with new flakes even before she had finished. All the hay she could eat and then some.

              I'd see if you can figure that part out before trying more walking/grazing as it seems like you are already getting him out quite a bit.

              Comment


              • #8
                If he doesn't eat his hay much at shows, it might be worthwhile taking beet pulp to shows to get extra forage in him. Also a good way to make sure he's getting some water intake.

                Sounds like by day three he is missing his pasture time. How often does he get hand-walked at shows? I've had some that needed to be hand walked ever 2 hours or so during the day at shows.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by Aleuronx View Post
                  Is this a pony? How much hay does he normally consume over the same span of time at home? How does that compare to what he ate at this away show?

                  A little over 1 bale of hay over ~3 days worth of feeding does not seem even close to enough forage feed unless this is a small 13.0 pony.

                  I think understanding this might be a big chunk of your answer. Is he normally fed out of a hay net at home? Maybe try just free feeding on the floor instead. A empty stomach will make more horses cranky and omeprazole can't counteract a empty stomach. It will lessen the amount of acid but a tum full of smaller amount of acid is still a tum full of acid.

                  My young horse at her first away show had hay in front of her constantly and I would refresh with new flakes even before she had finished. All the hay she could eat and then some.

                  I'd see if you can figure that part out before trying more walking/grazing as it seems like you are already getting him out quite a bit.
                  Not a pony. 17 hands but gangly. Very young. I do not feed hay at home for the 2 horses until probably December--they're out on grass 24/7. When the grass is finally done for the year it's a combo of large bale nets and loose hay (although I do not feed alfalfa with the group hay--that is saved for just this horse). At the show he had a hay net filled with Orchard and Alfalfa in front of him at all times, as well as hay on the floor under the net and all he does is nibble. He's not terribly food motivated in general (even at home, he doesn't graze when I ride the other horse, he stands there and watches, for example). And he is not at all cranky, sour, or ugly tempered--by day 3 he is just high as a kite. He wasn't pacing in the stall, but just alert, curious, and more interested in being a busy body than eating.

                  I know it's not a lot of hay he's eating at the shows. My 15.1 hand FEI horse will easily go through a bale a day at a show if I let him.
                  From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by blob99 View Post
                    If he doesn't eat his hay much at shows, it might be worthwhile taking beet pulp to shows to get extra forage in him. Also a good way to make sure he's getting some water intake.

                    Sounds like by day three he is missing his pasture time. How often does he get hand-walked at shows? I've had some that needed to be hand walked ever 2 hours or so during the day at shows.
                    I truly think this is the crux of the problem--lack of pasture time.

                    He gets hand walked a lot, with some grazing mixed in. Since he's a busy-body, even when I let him graze he grazes 30 seconds, then walks 30 feet, grazes, etc. But we also "power walk" around. I'd say he's easily out every 2 hours while I'm there, which is often 6-7am to 8-9pm each day. I could go back to the barn after dinner to hand walk (and sometimes do at like 10/11pm) but that is dependent on how far away the hotel is, etc. I think the real problem is that he is inside a stall a good 8-10 hours at night with no exercise and he is used to walking around all day and night (except for when he's sleeping himself, which we all know is less than 8 hours for horses, and definitely not in a row!).

                    I can certainly try some beet pulp this off season to see how he does and if he likes it. His grain is fed wet, and he drank very well the whole show so I don't think he is dehydrated. He also gets an electrolyte/gastric care type supplement pellet mixed with water between meals at shows.
                    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Delurking because I have this horse, and have several seasons of show strategy for him.

                      1. Replace turnout with longing - not LTD, just till horse stops exploding when asked to canter. No saddle, no sidereins. I do this in a halter. Mine gets longed until he feels better each morning of a multi-day show. Then he gets hosed off and is happier to hand-graze after that.
                      2. Leave him alone.
                      Frequent handwalking makes mine more anxious, it is mentally taxing for him to control himself to have acceptable ground manners. When you do handwalk, check his position in the stall first,if resting at the back let him be. Mine seems more relaxed if he gets plenty of human-free downtime.
                      3. Stallguard with haynet hung by or even outside door.
                      Mine ate better when he could watch the activity and eat at the same time. At other times he liked the haybale across in front of the stall, reaching over the stallguard.
                      4. Hay cubes.
                      He is also offered dry mini timothy/alfalfa cubes at home because he's an unreliable eater and sometimes prefers the cubes. At shows I keep a bucket of them hanging just in case he'd rather eat that. Mine likes them dry, but if yours likes them soaked,even better.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have one like this as well. Hand walking makes him worse... he needs to move his feet and be able to look around. I find lunging a couple times per day the most helpful for him.

                        Ive tried riding multiple times per day, trying to exhaust him. (I evented so I can wear down a horse but haven’t been able to with this guy... more tired he gets the worse his stress becomes) I’ve tried hand walking till my feet ache. I’ve tried bringing a best friend. Nothing works except the lunging... probably some turnout time would be good as well but not available at shows.

                        The only calming supplement that I have found to work is Easy Does It. Which is basically L- tryptophan If I’m remembering correctly. The lunging multiple times in just a snaffle bridle is the best and cheapest route. Or I just go to one day shows and work out of my trailer.. his favorite way to show.

                        Best of luck! And if you find another method please post back cause inquiring minds...
                        http://www.windsweptfarmllc.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Pony Fixer View Post

                          I truly think this is the crux of the problem--lack of pasture time.
                          I definitely think you're onto something here. Mine have 24/7 pasture access and I also have some issues at shows... Mine tends to get cranky rather than being more 'up' but different reactions, different horses. I started locking mine in at night starting about 2 weeks before overnight shows to help acclimate to spending more time in the stall and it does seem to help. Longer shows like championships are still a bit of a struggle by then end though. Hand walking just doesn't cut it in my experiences but it's really the only option.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My mare is a bit of a nut-job at shows, but is getting much better thanks to rigorous ulcer treatment before, during, and after, as well as TONS of hand-walking at the show.

                            At home she's out 24/7. She is a spooky nightmare if stalled, which is of course part of the problem at shows.

                            I tried Perfect Prep's day-of paste twice. The first time it seemed like it worked, but it may have just been a good day for her. The second time it didn't do squat.

                            ETA - the number behaviors that can be easily attributed to (or at least exacerbated by) ulcers is extremely higher than one would expect. The last five years with my girl, and last three years owning a small boarding facility, have made me a huge believer in treating for suspected ulcers for many issues. Two boarders have come in with persistent diarrhea, their owners have said "oh, that's just how he's always been." Like, for years, literally, they had persistently loose stool and diarrhea streaks on their hind legs, owners (and even vets) just said that's just how they are. I suggested treating, they treated with Ranitidine for a month, and the boys have had normal stool ever since. My mare used to not be very "food motivated," she would take a legit 45-60 minutes to eat one 3-qt scoop of grain, for example. Treated with Ranitidine (for some other additional reasons too), and she gobbles down her food now consistently for the past year. Any tiny change in behavior I treat her with a week of Ranitidine. I give her a full treatment dose for two days before a show, during the show, and two days after, and although she's still not "perfect" at shows, she's a million times better than she used to be. She also wouldn't eat much hay or drink hardly any water at overnight shows, but when I give her Ranitidine, she'll eat a whole bale in the day and a half there and drinks several buckets.
                            I'm not saying there aren't any horses that "are just that way." But I think the number is far less than is touted.
                            Last edited by mmeqcenter; Oct. 8, 2019, 04:42 PM.
                            Custom tack racks!
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                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My older TB was exactly like your horse, fine the first day and then progressively worse the next day.
                              My horses are pasture horses also.
                              I totally agree about longing in his halter to get his energy out.
                              If he is to much of a handful, longed him in his bridle, or a stud chain, or rope halter, whatever works best.
                              Now to answer your question, I tried PP on a green horse first time in the hunt field, I didn't see any difference in this horse.
                              I also used it on a horse on stall rest saw a slight change.
                              However I have a couple of friends who love it, says it keeps their horses alert but calm.
                              Going on their experiences it might be worth a try.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Pony Fixer View Post
                                The back story is that my awesome 6 yo gelding just wrapped up his first show season. Typically we are there 3 days--the day before the show starts we get there and warm up, 2 classes each weekend day, and then go home. At home, this horse is a willing but push ride, and is often ridden in an open 3 acre field as well as haul in lessons weekly. He's a gem. At shows he is great for the day we get there (he isn't terribly reactive or spooky), day 2 he's "up" but it's useful, and by day 3 he's a hot mess--kite on a string. He has no physical issues and I proactively treat for ulcers before shows. I think he just gets stir crazy--at home he has a 15' by 15' stall but it's come/go as he pleases. At shows they are 10' by 10' most places and of course no turnout. He eats his grain normally but does not eat a lot of hay--he's too busy watching what's going on, but doesn't pace or scream a lot. Someone recommended the Perfect Prep products and they seem to have "acute use" products that aren't given all the time--he's already mellow at home so I don't want him more laid back except at shows.

                                I'm hoping this will fix itself as he ages/seasons and gets more shows under his belt. But if I can help him to be more settled or something in the meantime I am up for it.
                                This describes my guy pretty closely - same age, limited experience with overnight shows, large area at home to move around in, but gets antsy in the stall pretty much from the beginning. He does eat and drink well at shows. I've tried taking him for calm walks/grazing around the grounds, and that works as long as he is out of the stall, but as soon as he's back he gets jumpy again.

                                Somewhere I picked up a sample of THE calming powder and tried that at our last show. It really did help with the agitation and he went from constantly pacing around his stall to happily munching his hay watching the other horses go by, but didn't get sluggish under saddle. This also has tryptophan as an active ingredient

                                https://www.totalhealthenhance.com/p...4%A2-p59387544
                                "So relax! Let's have some fun out here! This game's fun, OK? Fun goddamnit." Crash Davis; Bull Durham

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  If I had this horse, I wouldn’t take him for 3 days.

                                  And I wouldn’t take him for any days until the ulcers are solved.
                                  Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Dressagelvr View Post
                                    If I had this horse, I wouldn’t take him for 3 days.

                                    And I wouldn’t take him for any days until the ulcers are solved.
                                    Well bless your heart! He did not have ulcers when scoped earlier this season. It's unlikely he developed them at home while on daily generic omeprazole or at the show while on Ulcergard, alfalfa, etc. in the last 3 days. Could he have hind gut ulcers? Maybe. But then again so might your horse. He's been treated and is on prevention even though he didn't have them. I don't have my head in the sand, I don't want him to develop ulcers and so I do all-the-things as prevention. His symptoms are not typical of ulcer-y horses. As a vet, I know at least as much as the average horse person about this subject. 😉

                                    Basically, if you are *that* concerned about ulcers, you would never show at all. Or put your horse in a stall ever. Or in a horse trailer. Or lots of the things that we do with our horses as we enjoy them.
                                    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by TBKite View Post
                                      Delurking because I have this horse, and have several seasons of show strategy for him.

                                      1. Replace turnout with longing - not LTD, just till horse stops exploding when asked to canter. No saddle, no sidereins. I do this in a halter. Mine gets longed until he feels better each morning of a multi-day show. Then he gets hosed off and is happier to hand-graze after that.

                                      I did this at this past show. He did not explode, and I let him get out the ya-yas basically at liberty with just the halter and lunge line. He mostly fancy trotted around. I changed direction several times and after about 15 min he was back to himself and I could walk/graze him around.

                                      2. Leave him alone.
                                      Frequent handwalking makes mine more anxious, it is mentally taxing for him to control himself to have acceptable ground manners. When you do handwalk, check his position in the stall first,if resting at the back let him be. Mine seems more relaxed if he gets plenty of human-free downtime.

                                      Good advice. I tend to notice when he's napping and don't disturb him, but otherwise take him out as much as is feasible. I may think on this!

                                      3. Stallguard with haynet hung by or even outside door.
                                      Mine ate better when he could watch the activity and eat at the same time. At other times he liked the haybale across in front of the stall, reaching over the stallguard.

                                      I actually already do this during the day. Stall guard and he's into everything--plays with my chair, my ball cap, anything within reach. A real monkey. Mostly I just laugh and continue to put it all back out of reach. His hay net goes as close to the door as possible but I can try putting it out the door. He loves looking around at everything and is very personable.

                                      4. Hay cubes.
                                      He is also offered dry mini timothy/alfalfa cubes at home because he's an unreliable eater and sometimes prefers the cubes. At shows I keep a bucket of them hanging just in case he'd rather eat that. Mine likes them dry, but if yours likes them soaked,even better.

                                      I have not done cubes much because he wasn't much of a fan when I first got him (they were timothy cubes). But I can easily try alfalfa cubes, soaked, as a replacement for the alfalfa in the net and let him graze on those. Another helpful idea!
                                      From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

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                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by mmeqcenter View Post
                                        My mare is a bit of a nut-job at shows, but is getting much better thanks to rigorous ulcer treatment before, during, and after, as well as TONS of hand-walking at the show.

                                        At home she's out 24/7. She is a spooky nightmare if stalled, which is of course part of the problem at shows.

                                        I tried Perfect Prep's day-of paste twice. The first time it seemed like it worked, but it may have just been a good day for her. The second time it didn't do squat.

                                        ETA - the number behaviors that can be easily attributed to (or at least exacerbated by) ulcers is extremely higher than one would expect. The last five years with my girl, and last three years owning a small boarding facility, have made me a huge believer in treating for suspected ulcers for many issues. Two boarders have come in with persistent diarrhea, their owners have said "oh, that's just how he's always been." Like, for years, literally, they had persistently loose stool and diarrhea streaks on their hind legs, owners (and even vets) just said that's just how they are. I suggested treating, they treated with Ranitidine for a month, and the boys have had normal stool ever since. My mare used to not be very "food motivated," she would take a legit 45-60 minutes to eat one 3-qt scoop of grain, for example. Treated with Ranitidine (for some other additional reasons too), and she gobbles down her food now consistently for the past year. Any tiny change in behavior I treat her with a week of Ranitidine. I give her a full treatment dose for two days before a show, during the show, and two days after, and although she's still not "perfect" at shows, she's a million times better than she used to be. She also wouldn't eat much hay or drink hardly any water at overnight shows, but when I give her Ranitidine, she'll eat a whole bale in the day and a half there and drinks several buckets.
                                        I'm not saying there aren't any horses that "are just that way." But I think the number is far less than is touted.
                                        I appreciate your input. I use generic Omeprazole pretty much daily with my horses. I get it very inexpensively as a vet. Then I use the brand name when I think stress might be high. While ranitidine is indeed even cheaper, it has been shown to be less effective than omeprazole in prevention and treatment. You might want to ask your vet about the generic omeprazole as it's only once a day (instead of 2 or 3 like ranitidine) and it has been clinically proven to work faster.
                                        From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

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