• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Pasture Keeping the Show/ Training horse

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pasture Keeping the Show/ Training horse

    In about 5 years I want to move to Colorado. I would put a small barn but no stalls (maybe one or two for lay ups). I would like to have one or two dressage horses and a few ranch horses. I have never really liked the idea of stalls. I think the more turn out the better. Let a horse be a horse as much as possible. I was thinking of fencing in a 10-15 acer pasture and hopefully keeping it irrigated. Talk to me about pasture keeping a horse you show or train.

    This would mean you wouldnt have to do turn out or clean stalls. Also I would use the grass and round bales to do most of the feeding so that would save time. I would put large heated waterers and a shed. Of course there would be pasture maintance to keep you plenty busy. So does it work for the show/ training horse?
    http://community.webshots.com/user/desireekirsch

    http://docreberlark.shutterfly.com/?role=-1

  • #2
    I have a 4th, 2nd, 1st and Training level show horses who all live outside 24/7. All my horses do.

    I do have stalls, but the horses are so much happier out.
    It can be done!
    True North Dressage
    Select Cheval Canadiens for dressage and eventing
    www.TrueNorthDressage.com

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by Sabovee View Post
      I have a 4th, 2nd, 1st and Training level show horses who all live outside 24/7. All my horses do.

      I do have stalls, but the horses are so much happier out.
      It can be done!
      I guess my biggest thought would if your horse is that harry is it hard to ride with out spending hours waiting for them to dry?

      Sabovee I like those feeders you link to on your website.
      http://community.webshots.com/user/desireekirsch

      http://docreberlark.shutterfly.com/?role=-1

      Comment


      • #4
        Trace clip and blankets!

        All my horses live out. We have stalls for horrible weather but according to my horses, we only have horrible weather once or twice a year. Tonight the low is 20 with high winds and they have double blankets on and a ton of hay to eat... outside.

        Most of them are working horses. The horses who live at my sister farm come here for vacations Quite frankly, I think it's a lot easier to keep them fit and they sure are happier.
        "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
        ---
        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post
          Trace clip and blankets!

          All my horses live out. We have stalls for horrible weather but according to my horses, we only have horrible weather once or twice a year. Tonight the low is 20 with high winds and they have double blankets on and a ton of hay to eat... outside.

          Most of them are working horses. The horses who live at my sister farm come here for vacations Quite frankly, I think it's a lot easier to keep them fit and they sure are happier.

          Exactly.
          I have very happy, healthy athletes!

          Anyone that's in work gets clipped and blanketed.
          True North Dressage
          Select Cheval Canadiens for dressage and eventing
          www.TrueNorthDressage.com

          Comment


          • #6
            My good friend keeps her two horses in turnout with access to stalls 24/7. She *does* have to clean the stalls; the mare trashes hers within a few days, while the gelding (who competes) is more neat. She does not have to clean daily, more like pick out every 3 days or so, add shavings as needed, and replace everything about once every two weeks.

            I do believe that horses should have as much turnout as possible!
            You have to have experiences to gain experience.

            1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

            Comment


            • #7
              The keeping of them is relatively easy. The riding of them in a snowy, cold climate in the winter is more difficult. You need to plan for that, depending on where you choose to live. You can easily have significant snow on the ground in the Rockies for 5 months of the year, and as much as everyone will tell you that you can ride and train in snow, and I used to when I lived in lower New York State, it ain't so when there's 3ft on the ground and more powder coming, and the roads are too treacherous to trailer out... and all this is followed by the most horrendous mud season you have ever seen...

              I've finally given in and board my dressage horse in the winter so I can have a decent arena to ride in, especially after work in the winter, and have some hope of making some progress.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by atr View Post
                The keeping of them is relatively easy. The riding of them in a snowy, cold climate in the winter is more difficult. You need to plan for that, depending on where you choose to live. You can easily have significant snow on the ground in the Rockies for 5 months of the year, and as much as everyone will tell you that you can ride and train in snow, and I used to when I lived in lower New York State, it ain't so when there's 3ft on the ground and more powder coming, and the roads are too treacherous to trailer out... and all this is followed by the most horrendous mud season you have ever seen...

                I've finally given in and board my dressage horse in the winter so I can have a decent arena to ride in, especially after work in the winter, and have some hope of making some progress.
                Yeah I was thinking that too. I might want to put up a small indoor arena with 2 stalls for lay ups or cold nights.
                http://community.webshots.com/user/desireekirsch

                http://docreberlark.shutterfly.com/?role=-1

                Comment


                • #9
                  My third level horse and the two youngsters all live outside 24/7 year round. It does not get very cold down here (well, ok, it was freezing last night, literally!). They have a large run-in shed they can use, and when it's going to be very cold, I blanket them. However, none of them are clipped. Because it doesn't get cold, they don't grow a lot of hair.

                  I could not really stand to keep my horses stalled. I know they are happier outside. The down side is, when I go to shows, my mare is not used to being locked up and by the second day, she is more than ready to go home. So she always does better the first day of a show. I try and hand walk her a lot at shows, and if it's a venue that's close enough, I've often trailered her home after showing the first day to turn her out all night, and then taken her back for the second day.
                  Donerail Farm
                  www.donerailfarm.com
                  http://donerailfarm.wordpress.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My horses live in 1/2 acre and 1 acre paddocks with run in sheds. They get sheets on only to keep them clean. When it is cold, I throw extra hay. Next years I will consider a trace clip on one mare, who gets a bit shaggier than the others, as cooling her off does take a little longer.

                    Mine have lived in stalls in the past, so they do just fine at shows. It's nice to give them the experience of stall living at some point when they are younger, so it's not an entirely new thing on the occaision that they need to be stalled.

                    Keeping them out does mean more hair and more grooming, but it is so worth it. Some days, they are the only horses outside... It also makes me concentrate on mud management for my paddocks.
                    Akal Ranch Blog - http://akalranch.com/
                    Simrat Khalsa Fine Art & Photography - http://www.simratkhalsa.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cyndi View Post
                      The down side is, when I go to shows, my mare is not used to being locked up and by the second day, she is more than ready to go home.
                      Yup - this is one reason I have my horses out from sunrise to sunset and stalled in the evening. They're more accustomed to stalling during shows so handle being "in" more during that time. And yes - I DO walk and lunge them several times during the day (and evening) at shows.
                      Now in Kentucky

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Most of mine are out 24/7, but they are blanketed in the winter. The broodmares go in the barn 1-2 months before giving birth and the babies are in the barn with a huge paddock over the winter because I don't blanket foals and that way they get used to barn life and are easier for me to work with. The horses that are in training also come in and have to live in stalls for a while. My show horse is sort of an inbetween. She's in at night, mainly because she is fed different and low horse in rank, so that way I can make sure she gets what she's supposed to. I usually ride her in the morning, so after I'm done riding her she gets turned out with the broodmares. On the days when I can't ride her she get's turned out right after breakfast. I don't mind picking out stalls, but I do believe the more turn-out the better and my horses are the proof! In over 20 years of horse ownership I've never had one colic or any other serious problems besides bumps and scrapes and the occasional retained placenta! Knocking wildly on wood now!
                        Hoppe, Hoppe, Reiter...
                        Wenn er faellt dann schreit er...

                        Originally posted by mbm
                        forward is like love - you can never have enough

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          With all the added blanketing and clipping and grooming is it more work keeping them inside or out?
                          http://community.webshots.com/user/desireekirsch

                          http://docreberlark.shutterfly.com/?role=-1

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Definitly more work if you are keeping them inside. Cleaning a stall is more work than throwing on another blanket.
                            ~ Kimberlee
                            www.SpunkyDiva.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Mine is out 24/7, isn't blanketed unless needed (ie, almost never). He's hairy for a TB. However - I'm careful how I work him. There is plenty you can do in hand, on the ground, or at the walk to increase suppleness and strength and balance.

                              Last year we worked through the winter except in the worst of the cold (or when driving conditions/ice made it too difficult to do anything safely, like drive there) and we never needed his cooler.

                              PS He'll be 16 in March.
                              www.specialhorses.org
                              a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I ride for a woman that keeps her horses out 24/7. The horses (all WB's, not that it matters though) LOVE it. Her older guy (3rd level Dutch) comes in at night in the winter, but only because his feet fall apart from the wetness. All her babies stay out to be babies. We reduce work load to maintain with out overdoing in the cold, which I think is good for their brains too. The fields have large run-ins, but each horse has a stall just in case.

                                My dream farm would have a barn with dutch doors that would open into fields so that the horses could come and go, or be brought in for severe weather.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Colorado isn't New York. The sun shines almost every day on the eastern slope, and there are many snow free days.
                                  I lived in Boulder for 9 years in the 70's.... took horseback riding for my PE credits, showed in the winter..... no indoor at that time, all outdoor rings, don't remember many "no riding" days......
                                  Loretta

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Colorado and the outside horse

                                    If you live on the front range I wouldn't get to worried about snow. Yes you'll get it but it usually warms up in a day or two and your able to ride again. You do, however, have to deal with a frozen arena so riding first thing in the morning is out. Of course it would certainly be excellent to have an indoor - even a small one - for those days when the weather makes it impossible. If you move into the mountains that's a whole different story and is more like the above poster described with snow all winter.

                                    What I'd be more focused on is the water and irrigated pasture. Water rights put property at a premium and getting the water on the property can be expensive and time consuming. I looked for awhile to try and buy something with water - everything that had water was too expensive or too beat up to even think about moving into.
                                    Good luck with obtaining your dream

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Mine are all out 24/7. The riding horses have access to a run in shed row mare motel, and are on smaller pastures (1/2 to 1 acre), except my stallion, who has a 100x70 pen (just because it is EXPENSIVE to put up suitable stallion fencing). Mr. Stud muffin has a large 3 sided run in shed in one corner of his pen. The bigger pastures (5 to 20 acres) all have 3 sided shelters too - where the broodies or youngsters reside.

                                      It isn't as cold as CO, we have evenings into the mid and upper 20s at the coldest, and no snow.

                                      My riding horses are clipped and blanketed. Either trace clip, or body clip but with full hair on the head and legs (well, I trim up the face a bit, but I don't clip it, and I take off feathers). The blanket keeps the body clean, so mostly it is hosing off muddy legs (you do need to get a look at those legs to make sure no cuts, swelling, scratches, etc). and knocking mud off the head. I DO think a stalled horse is MUCH cleaner, but I don't think they are HAPPIER!
                                      www.MysticOakRanch.com Friesian/Warmblood Crosses, the Ultimate Sporthorse
                                      Director, WTF Registry

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        The "dream barn"

                                        "My dream farm would have a barn with dutch doors that would open into fields so that the horses could come and go, or be brought in for severe weather."

                                        Yes, seeuatx, that's what we built. I'd never go back to closing my horses in or the "turn in and out" thing. I clip and blanket for winter riding....small clip job and light blanket.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X