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Getting on is getting harder

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  • #21
    Originally posted by merrygoround View Post
    They need to make these saddles lighter.

    Getting up, no problem, good mounting block. Getting down from to 16.2, 16.3 and 17 hands takes thoughtful consideration.

    Are you spying on me?

    Recently, I sprained/strained/royally f'd up my trapezius, and not only couldn't dismount properly (like that happens much lately), but had to slide off the RIGHT side onto the arena cinder block wall while my instructor held my boy. You know, because I'm a lady.

    Even on good days, I wait a second or two before getting down. I measure a) how cold are my feet and b) how many people are witnessing this moment. Nobody needs to hear me grunt and oof and ouch my way to the ground.
    Move along.

    Comment


    • #22
      I still manage to get on OK but I can't sit in the saddle for the first few minutes. I have to ride in two point at the walk and trot before I can finally sit. My problem is my hips. I cannot line up heel, hip and shoulder. I have to sit in a chair seat for a few minutes. After a while I get used to the pain and concentrate on the horse.

      Getting off is a problem. It seems that my leg is not connected to my body. Sometimes I sit for a while before I can finally swing my leg over. Then i slowly slide down the side of the horse hanging on to the saddle for dear life. Fortunately my horse has patiently gotten used to this routine.

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by joliemom, again View Post

        Are you spying on me?

        Recently, I sprained/strained/royally f'd up my trapezius, and not only couldn't dismount properly (like that happens much lately), but had to slide off the RIGHT side onto the arena cinder block wall while my instructor held my boy. You know, because I'm a lady.

        Even on good days, I wait a second or two before getting down. I measure a) how cold are my feet and b) how many people are witnessing this moment. Nobody needs to hear me grunt and oof and ouch my way to the ground.
        OMG I know that you mean. Those few minutes before you get off ... making sure you have circulation in your feet, making sure that you are ready for that sting when you land! Ouchies!

        I am another one for the three step mounting block and short horse. Right now I am only riding in my dreams, but my horse at the barn is only around 14.2 - 14.3 (never sticked him) and perfectly happy with that height.
        https://fearlessriderreturns.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #24
          mswillie Thanks for the tip. I will talk to my PCP about injections before thinking "surgery" - she suggested OTC NSAIDs & then maybe RX ones.
          Imagine that.... all these years of HA joint injections for our horses & never considered I could benefit

          CFFarm I ain't laughing! That's my "block" less a step - now that the 17h++ is gone, 3 is fine for my 16H guy.
          *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
          Steppin' Out 1988-2004
          Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
          Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

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          • #25
            I can sympathize! A saddle with a lower cantle might help some on this thread.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
              mswillie Thanks for the tip. I will talk to my PCP about injections before thinking "surgery" - she suggested OTC NSAIDs & then maybe RX ones.
              Imagine that.... all these years of HA joint injections for our horses & never considered I could benefit
              I'd suggest seeing an orthopedist. I went to a multi doctor practice and the doctor who saw me is a sports medicine specialist. He showed me the x-rays, I could see the damage. I have some OA and a couple of bone spurs. Fortunately for me, I'm not at bone on bone yet. The cartilage is thin but there is still some there. I was absolutely terrified at the prospect of having a needle stuck in my knee. This guy was great, it didn't hurt at all and I couldn't believe how much better I felt.

              FF to the beginning of December and I'm starting to have some pain again so I added oral HA (started at 125 mg/day) to my other joint supplements to try to extend the time between injections. Injections no more frequently than every 6 months seems to be the rule of thumb. I'll be damned if it isn't working. So far I'm at 9 months and counting. I'm not 100% pain free, however when my knee does start to hurt it's easily controlled with a single dose of Tylenol or Naproxen.

              Like you, I want to avoid surgery as long as possible. At my age (58) every day I get pain free is a bonus.
              "Some people are born on third base and go through life thinking they hit a triple” – Barry Switzer

              Comment


              • #27
                If misery loves company, count me in the stiff and creaky group. A three step mounting block or higher is a lifesaver!

                Comment


                • #28
                  We tend to use a picnic table bench just outside the barn, but I had to give up on it as my joints are deteriorating and since the bench is a bit low, it was starting to put too much stress on my knee when mounting. We added a 3 step mounting block a few months ago, and I now use it to mount. Several of us with bad knees try to also dismount using the mounting block, but I am having too much trouble hitting that small area and have come close to falling a few times, so I try to dismount on the picnic table bench - it's a larger landing surface. If I am at the covered arena, I mount using the 3-step there, and either ride back to the main barn so I can use the picnic table bench to dismount, or I dismount to the ground at the covered. My feet and knees really feel the shock though when I hit the ground. Getting old sucks - all my old injuries (from softball, volleyball, soccer, basketball, tennis, not to mention horse-related injuries) are coming back to haunt me. Plus I have active and advancing arthritis in many joints.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Last year, my vet recommended Flexadin UC-II joint supplement for my horse. She also commented that there was a human version. I thought, what the heck, might as well give it a try. Now, I'm really skeptical about this kind of thing, but I have an old hip injury that was really causing me problems and I was told that this product is most effective under exactly those circumstances.

                    For me, this stuff is practically a miracle drug. I have seen a tremendous improvement and it occurred within the first month or so of starting this supplement. I don't work for the company, have no stake in the business, and have no idea if anyone else will experience the same benefits, but thought I would mention it since the subject of joint supplements has come up. There are several different brands; I take "Now UC-II Type II collagen."

                    I have no idea if it works on the horse.
                    "Facts are meaningless. You can use facts to prove anything
                    that's even remotely true."

                    Homer Simpson

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by NoSuchPerson View Post

                      For me, this stuff is practically a miracle drug. I have seen a tremendous improvement and it occurred within the first month or so of starting this supplement. I don't work for the company, have no stake in the business, and have no idea if anyone else will experience the same benefits, but thought I would mention it since the subject of joint supplements has come up. There are several different brands; I take "Now UC-II Type II collagen."

                      I have no idea if it works on the horse.
                      I may add this to my own regimen. Do they make smartpacks for people?

                      "Some people are born on third base and go through life thinking they hit a triple” – Barry Switzer

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        We have a mounting block that has steps on both sides which makes dismounting very easy. I thought it would be hard to train my horse to stand still and wait for me to climb down, but no.

                        Even if I use one of the more traditional mounting blocks on the property, I just approach it from the opposite side so I can walk down the steps.

                        All of the older riders do this, as well as the younger ones with bad backs or knees. I should also add that all our mounting blocks are custom made out of wood and have larger platforms. It’s a big lesson barn, so the little ones need a stable place to learn how to mount prop. Works for everyone.
                        A helmet saved my life.

                        2017 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          "It's not the aging I mind, it's the decrepitude". First thing to help is to train pony to stand like a rock at the 3 step mounting block. My mare is 15'2". I am thinking of how to train her to bend her knees a bit for me to get on. Kneeling like a camel would be too conspicuous.
                          I fell off the mounting block trying to dismount onto it, and managed to scrape my saddle badly with my jacket zipper sliding/slithering off. I now lean a bit forward and slide down her shoulder. Mare is very tolerant of my foibles.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I'm only in my 20s still but I broke my hip a year and a half ago so I feel this thread. We have a tall, wooden 3 step block that I get on and usually off from. If I take too long sliding off my wonderful horse will bolt on me so I've learned to do it quickly and keep my left foot in the stirrup until my right one touches the block. (which is only about 3 inches from my stirrups)

                            I usually stand on the block for far too long because my legs nowadays just feel heavy all the time and I don't want to step off. Sometimes I grab the stirrup leather as a brace and step backwards onto the ground.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Argh. 5'2" on a 16.3 horse.
                              Getting on isn't bad as long as there's a mounting block. Getting off is a whole different story. My technique is called Slide n' Roll. When my ankle is really inflamed, I ask someone to stand just behind where I will land upon dismounting (actually just sliding off.) Then they can prop me forward, before I fall on my ass –– so this doesn't happen:

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                              • #35
                                Originally posted by Cat Tap View Post
                                I still manage to get on OK but I can't sit in the saddle for the first few minutes. I have to ride in two point at the walk and trot before I can finally sit. My problem is my hips. I cannot line up heel, hip and shoulder. I have to sit in a chair seat for a few minutes. After a while I get used to the pain and concentrate on the horse.

                                Getting off is a problem. It seems that my leg is not connected to my body. Sometimes I sit for a while before I can finally swing my leg over. Then i slowly slide down the side of the horse hanging on to the saddle for dear life. Fortunately my horse has patiently gotten used to this routine.
                                I went to a Julie Goodnight clinic about riding until you are 90. It was at Equine Affaire and there was a huge crowd. Some people there were in their 80s so I guess that makes me a kid.

                                One thing she focused on is riding while standing up in the stirrups at the walk. If you roll your thighs inward a bit your lower legs will move backwards but you can keep the straight line from your ear to your ankle. When I first tried it I think it was more like two-point because I was gripping the grab strap and leaning on the pommel. Now I concentrate on not gripping or leaning while looking up with my hands in front. This helps me stretch out my legs, knees and hips, and cuts down on the pain. It's good for building leg strength, balance and core. I get into the same position when I'm ready to dismount. My horse is really good at standing which helps.

                                I like Julie a lot because she concentrates on the rider, not just the horse, but in a different way. Her RFD show has covered topics like perfectionism, fear, and recovering from illnesses and surgery, including stroke and breast cancer.. She is 58, so she understands a lot about the aging process. I like her website also.
                                "Providence sometimes takes care of idiots." Agnes Morley Cleaveland, No Life for a Lady, 1977.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  I took a High Country 2 step and turned it into a 3 step by adding a very heavy wooden base to it. Now... it won't move no matter what you or horse do. Makes it much easier to get on and off because its rock solid stable. The High Country seem to be a bit wider than the others, hence my choice.

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