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Two (female-end) outlet long, heavy-duty extension cord? EDIT - REVISING VERY INFANTILE ORIGINAL QUESTION WITH NEW ONE ABOUT HEATING WITH COMPOSTING MUCK, POST 15\

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  • Two (female-end) outlet long, heavy-duty extension cord? EDIT - REVISING VERY INFANTILE ORIGINAL QUESTION WITH NEW ONE ABOUT HEATING WITH COMPOSTING MUCK, POST 15\

    I need to plug in two things in my chicken coop/pig house and it's 75 feet or so to the nearest electric outlet. Last year I ran a heavy duty extension cord, no problem, for just one waterer. But this year the livestock castle has two waterers that both need de-icers.
    Is there such a thing as a long, heavy duty extension cord with two female ends?
    I'm trying to google it but come up with lightweight 6' jobs for inside use. Maybe I'm not using the correct keywords?
    Last edited by Hunter's Rest; Nov. 28, 2017, 07:21 AM.
    * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.

  • #2
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/MasterPl...L-US/301728032
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

    Comment


    • #3
      Be careful, two heaters will draw a lot of power. If the power draw is low enough, an outlet strip will provide multiple connections.

      You could also purchase a heavy extension cord with a "Multi Tap" end. But that will not provide any overload protection.

      This link is to a very reasonable cost item with a circuit breaker
      Visit The Home Depot to buy Tripp Lite Protect It! 6 ft. Cord with 6 Outlet Strip TLP606
      Equus makus brokus but happy

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Hosspuller - sooooo .... plug that power strip into my HD extension cord (already have), and plug chicken water pail and hog water de-icer (one of those drop-in jobs) into the power strip?
        I guess, really, there's no reason for me not to run two extension cords to the outlet in the shed .... Is that better/safer/more efficient?
        * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Hunter's Rest View Post
          Hosspuller - sooooo .... plug that power strip into my HD extension cord (already have), and plug chicken water pail and hog water de-icer (one of those drop-in jobs) into the power strip?
          I guess, really, there's no reason for me not to run two extension cords to the outlet in the shed .... Is that better/safer/more efficient?
          Yes ... the outlet strip circuit breaker will trip if the load is too much (more than 15 amps) Two cords into the same outlet isn't much better. BUT if you can find outlets on two different circuits ... that's much better since the load is divided. The drop in heater is my biggest concern. If it's like a stock tank heater, it'll be 1500 watts alone. Bucket heats are usually smaller loads.
          Equus makus brokus but happy

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Crap. I imagine all of the outlets in the shed (4 or 5) are on the same circuit.
            Maybe I just commit to running one in daytime, one at night. Plug/unplug. I can top with hot water/etc. and could move the chickens (just 2 roosters) inside the garage (grab them at night) if we get snow predicted and let the hog waterer stay connected.
            * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.

            Comment


            • #7
              HR ... maybe not... look at the panel for the shed. If there are multiple breakers for the shed, you have multiple circuits. Turn off a single breaker. Any outlet that's still on, is a different circuit. A table lamp is easily moved and you can see if it's lighted or not from a distance.
              Equus makus brokus but happy

              Comment


              • #8
                OP .....the suggested power strip is for indoor use only and would not be safe to use. Any exposed outlet to weather moisture is at risk for shorting out and should be considered dangerous.

                If you check your breaker box it should tell you how many amps you have available in your shed service. 15 amps is common but you may have something thing different.
                Once you determine your service amps, look at your heaters for their AMP rating. It should be stamped on the cord or on a plastic tag attached to the cord...hopefully.

                As long as all items on the service draw a total of less than what your service is rated for...you can run that extra extension cord. Your extension cord must also be rated for the full service amp...for example..15 amps...or you may notice that the cord gets hot/warm when the heater is on.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Thanks! I'll investigate tomorrow.
                  * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The most important question that needs to be answered before being able to give reasonably sound advice. What is the power demand for what is being plugged in?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ticker View Post
                      OP .....the suggested power strip is for indoor use only and would not be safe to use. Any exposed outlet to weather moisture is at risk for shorting out and should be considered dangerous.

                      If you check your breaker box it should tell you how many amps you have available in your shed service. 15 amps is common but you may have something thing different.
                      Once you determine your service amps, look at your heaters for their AMP rating. It should be stamped on the cord or on a plastic tag attached to the cord...hopefully.

                      As long as all items on the service draw a total of less than what your service is rated for...you can run that extra extension cord. Your extension cord must also be rated for the full service amp...for example..15 amps...or you may notice that the cord gets hot/warm when the heater is on.
                      There is a bit of misinformation in this. All residential house and barns are wire for 2 types of circuits/outlets. 15 amp or 20 amp which are "protected" by the same rated circuit breakers (some referred to them as "fuses" but this is a misnomer that is hold over from very old style "fuse boxes")

                      The vast majority of circuits/outlets are rated at 15 amps which is he size of the breaker. There are also two different wires used. 15 amp lines are usually wired with 14-2 gauge. Though the larger 12-2 can be used. Lights, low demand appliance outlets are wired with 14-2 because the wire is cheaper than 12-2. All 20 amp lines by code have to be wired with 12-2 wire. Houses may also have some 240 volt outlets for window air conditioners, electric stove, etc. But these have a special outlet so it is impossible to plug 120 into it.

                      Extension cords come in gauges (the higher the number the smaller the wire) of 16-2, 14-2, 12-2. All can be plugged into a "15 amp" outlet. The can be plugged into most 20 amp outlets. Specialty cords can be found in 10-2 that can be plugged into a generator for 240v service.

                      16-2 and 14-2 can "carry" 15 amps of demand. It will say so on the package specs. But they are not meant to be used on a high continuous demand "appliance" circuits. Like a 1500 watt tank heater. They will usually get very hot, exp at the interface, the "plugs" at either end. The length of the "wire" cord is a very important "number" to take into consideration also. The longer the wire the more "resistance" electricity encounters while trying to to "flow" through it. This is where the heat comes from and voltage drop happens. The appliance/widget that is plugged into the line is trying to "suck" more power out of the line than the line can deliver.Depending on the "widget" this can cause failure. This is one of the big reasons tank heaters fail/break.

                      When sizing something to the circuit the demand needed should be several amps lower than the circuit is wire for. 1500 watt tank heaters draw 12.5 amps. As I said above lengths, the runs of all wiring in a house or a barn is taken into account when the being designed. Also the "demand" that will be placed on those circuits. When we plug a 50-100-150 foot extension cord into the "mix". This totally changes what the circuit was designed to carry. Esp on outlets that are wired with 14-2 conductors. The "size" of the wire is stamped on it. For years residential wiring was all white regardless of wire size. 15-20+ years ago it was changed to color coding. 12-2 is yellow, 14-2 is white, 10-2 is orange, 8-2 is red. Bigger than that is black.

                      The above is just the basics, the Cliff notes, lol.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Be careful with this....I ran two heavy duty cords together, I think they were 50 ft each. Specifically to run chicken waterer. I added a heavy duty plug that had 3 outlets which I plugged the horse water tub heater into. It melted and I couldn't get it unplugged again....Not sure what I am going to do this year..........

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by spacehorse View Post
                          Be careful with this....I ran two heavy duty cords together, I think they were 50 ft each. Specifically to run chicken waterer. I added a heavy duty plug that had 3 outlets which I plugged the horse water tub heater into. It melted and I couldn't get it unplugged again....Not sure what I am going to do this year..........
                          I read this as you ran a "chicken waterer" AND a "horse tub heater" together on 100 feet of extension cord. Is this correct ?
                          Equus makus brokus but happy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That's how I read it too, and boy, you are lucky you didn't have a fire. That it melted down without tripping a circuit should cause serious evaluation of your circuit protections. Get GFI installed!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Spacehorse's house circuit breakers did their job. They protected the house wiring. Extension cords are not protected. Neither does a GFI (Ground Fault Interrupter) A GFI protects a person from shock, not overload.
                              Equus makus brokus but happy

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                I've spent the last 48 hours researching this, after asking what I realize now was a moronic question. When you search 'non electric ways to heat stock tank' on google, it references tons of CotH threads, and lots of off trid and livestock sites.
                                I'm off the two heavy draw items on the one circuit -- thanks for protecting me from my own stupidity -- and now onto building 1, 2 or 3 insulated boxes to house the three big horse tanks in the various fields. i know sometimes I'll have to plug in stock tank heaters, but that will at least help, and save a lot of money.
                                Same with the pig waterer, maybe, or possibly just commit to carrying them fresh warm water a few times a day.
                                The heated bowl for the chickens may have to stay plugged in, out in their shed, though I may just plan to keep a bucket of fresh water at the end of my garage (which stays open) for dogs/cats/chickens since I pass by that place 10x a day. Unless we get snowmaggedon, those animals can come to the water rather than the water coming to them.
                                ANOTHER CONVERSATION -- I found all the solar tanks for sale (expensive and not enough gallons, plus I'd need 3 or 4 since I have 3-4 herds), and vague plans for insulated surrounds, some with passive solar panels. I'm planning to try this on Sunday with my handyman helper, but was wondering -- what about a passive heat source from composting muck?
                                I find a lot of general chatter about it but zero exact plans. I found the ground source plans, but my tanks live right up against the barns in two of four cases, and I don't want to dig a big deep hole by the barn, plus I only have a regular auger - is that deep enough?
                                I'd love to just build my plywood frame a little bigger than necessary and - what would I do? - put 1' of muck at the bottom, then put in the water tank, then backfill with muck, then put a lip at the top - maybe with holes so a little rainwater can keep the compost moist? Then fill my tank with water from the hose as needed, and depend on warmth from composting to keep it from freezing?
                                I can't think of why it won't work, but then again, I couldn't think of why not to put 2 long ext. cords from one outlet.
                                In all the old chats on this subject, I can't find a dedicated thread on compost heat sources used in this manner.
                                * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I know it doesn't solve all of your problems, but I love K&H heaters - they are available in much lower wattage than those found at TSC and other feed stores.

                                  I live in Southern Maryland, and I have used the 250w in 30 gal and 50 gal tanks for several years now with no ice. The 500w in 100 gal tanks perform equally well.

                                  http://www.khmfg.com/ultimate-stock-tank-de-icer.html

                                  I do not have outlets at my tanks at home, so I do run extension cords. I have not had an issue with the lower wattage of the K&H heaters. I do use "heavier" extension cords, not the good ol' orange kind.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I used to live in Winchester, VA. I remember the winters there. You might be better served by small wattage heaters, in insulated water tanks. It doesn't take much heat to keep water from freezing if the heat loss is low. (warm water is a different issue) I think the main benefit of compost heating is the insulating value of the compost container walls. Just like the compost needs a large and deep pile which holds the heat. One can't compost on a cookie sheet.

                                    Floating a piece of foam in a stock tank helps reduce heat loss, putting the tank in an insulated box does the same. Etc... all ideas that get you drinkable animal water.
                                    Equus makus brokus but happy

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by spacehorse View Post
                                      Be careful with this....I ran two heavy duty cords together, I think they were 50 ft each. Specifically to run chicken waterer. I added a heavy duty plug that had 3 outlets which I plugged the horse water tub heater into. It melted and I couldn't get it unplugged again....Not sure what I am going to do this year..........
                                      You plugged two heavy duty cords together to make a 100' run out to your chicken water heater. there, you put on one of these on: https://www.amazon.com/GE-Heavy-Duty.../dp/B001UE7SB4 and plugged both the chicken water AND the horse water heaters into it. The whole thing overheated and melted.

                                      Right?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by HungarianHippo View Post
                                        That's how I read it too, and boy, you are lucky you didn't have a fire. That it melted down without tripping a circuit should cause serious evaluation of your circuit protections. Get GFI installed!
                                        A GFI plug won't do a thing about an overload.

                                        Comment

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