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What are you using for fencing?

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  • What are you using for fencing?

    I am in the process of upgrading old fencelines to new posts and panels. I wanted to pick the collective brains here for input about what is being used these days, just so I'm not missing anything that would be new to me.

    I originally had three board wooden fence. Very pretty, but high maintenance and now entire sections of fenceline need replacing at once because the posts are breaking off underground. (my fault, I used cheaper pressure treated landscape ties for posts)

    I also lined the inside of these older wooden paddocks a couple years ago with Red Diamond no-climb fencing to protect the wood a bit more and prolong it. I do like that. It's a bit pricey and tough to fix, and I am getting sharp ends in places where it's gotten broken.

    One paddock I did with better grade 4x4 and no climb fencing, topped with a single wooden rail. I like this one, but again, it's not the easiest thing to fix and the lower part of the no-climb has more flex than I would like.

    I now find myself changing old fencelines over to pressure treated wooden posts and round pen panels affixed between them. So far so good, although I worry about an accident occuring that would split the metal. On the pro's side, they are easy to install and maintain, (esp. when they come pre-painted) and the horses aren't chewing or fussing with them. On the con's side is the cost and the potential for injury if one is compromised.

    I have not used any of the Ramm fencing, or similar. I really know very little about it. I have a couple more paddocks to build and would like to investigate fencing options.

    What do you use?
    Pro's?
    Cons?
    If you could use any fencing at all, what would you choose?
    And what would you avoid like the plaque?
    TIA.

  • #2
    We have three board for most of our fencing. When we bought the place earlier this year, much of it was in poor repair, and we spent money and lots of our own time replacing a whole lot of it. I like three board for perimeter fencing because it is solid and very, very visible.

    However, my internal fences that we're building to create a rotational grazing system and to fence off the wetland and stream area on the property, are all Horseguard. I loff Horseguard. More importantly, my husband, who is stuck doing a lot of the fence building LOFFS Horseguard.

    It was VERY easy to install on T-posts, and with the nice covers they sell, it looks attractive too. The horses respect it, and the one time I had a horse run into it, all I had to do was spend 5 minutes re-tensioning the fence, and it was done. We even were able to run a strand on top of the three board where we share a pasture fence with the neighbors horses. No communing over the fence!

    Also, the Horseguard customer service is great, and their product is so easy to install. Everything is ingeniously made.

    I will say that I don't think I'd use it for all the perimeter fencing though. That's mostly because I like hard, solid, VERY visible fencing that is TOUGH for horses to get through, and in my mind, nothing is better for that than 3 or 4 board fence.
    Here Be Dragons: My blog about venturing beyond the lower levels as a dressage amateur.

    Comment


    • #3
      Exterior fencing is Electorbraid with metal corner posts and their fiberglass posts in between........In the grass pastures I have treated wood posts with tape.....in the paddocks I have the tape but have used metals posts......they chew if they are confined.......so the metal elements chewed posts.

      Picture of the paddocks



      Dalemma

      Comment


      • #4
        Avoid? Barbed wire, high tensile wire (by that I mean wire that cuts rather than snaps, too strong of wire, too tight of wire).

        Standard for the TB farms is four board or diamond wire with a top board. Tried and true, generally accepted as safe for all equines.

        They can kill themselves on anything though, or break a leg, so it is sort of a crapshoot on all fencing as to which one is the safest.

        For our own place we wanted wire with a sight board, but we are still waiting to get the holes drilled through our rock (DH is a cheap fella) so since we had planned to subdivide internally we went with Electrobraid, which suited our terrain well, was visible, could be hung from t posts or trees or any surface really, and is more user-friendly than plain electric wire so disconnectable single strands are easy to put in and use. Ramm and centaur were both nice but didn't offer the flexibility of the Electrobraid, which is basically a nylon rope.

        Stock panels we use for pens. They are a nice option but I can't off the top of my head compare them price wise, I guess I need to figure the precise cost per foot of my fences (DON"T want to do that, really I don't). The ones we have have taken some abuse by the pony, who has leaned on the gate panel and the divider panel, bent up a couple of pipes etc. I see this as a problem because they aren't really straightenable and they look bad, I want to place to look reasonably nice, well kept etc.

        ETA We also have a wind issue here, and the EB is a rope and not affected by wind, the off label tape that was here when we moved in flapped and wiggled something awful, and the neighbors' cows walked right through it.
        Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
        Incredible Invisible

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        • #5
          Where is your fencing on the property, and what else is around it?

          I use 3 strands of electrobraid- no cross fencing/perimeter, just two seperate fields. I live in a fairly rural area and both pastures are surrounded 90%+ by 10' wild rose hedges, and then a good several hundred acres of forest on the outside of that... so I feel VERY confident that the horses aren't going ANYWHERE.

          If I lived in a less rural area or near roads that people actually drove one and didn't have my wonderful rose hedges I would probably put up no-climb or something similar. For me it's just as much fencing for the horses so they don't hurt themselves on the fencing, as it is taking the landscape/setup into mind.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have found three board fencing (using the right materials, professionally installed) to be very low maintenance.
            Janet

            chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).

            Comment


            • #7
              I am upgrading some of my fencelines to electrified coated wire (5 strands). We have a little of everything on the family farm, and like this the best. The key is ELECTRIC. Horses don't mess with the fences if there's a strand of electricified something there.

              Comment


              • #8
                I love my Horseguard bipolar fencing with solar chargers. Very affordable, very easy to install and virtually no maintenance. I put in posts where I had to, and used their fiberglass stakes everywhere else. It looks elegant (even if not quite as elegant as board fence).

                If I had endless amounts of money, I'd honestly put in board fence everywhere (with the Horseguard fence if I still had a cribber) but since I don't and I live where I live, I don't care to move rocks for the next fifteen years.

                When I was looking at my fencing alternatives, I was intrigued by the Bayco Finish Line but didn't want to put in all those posts. I'd still be digging today.
                Last edited by easyrider; Jul. 2, 2010, 01:29 PM. Reason: mixed up my fencing with my aspirin
                The aids are the legs, the hands, the weight of the rider, the whip, the caress, the voice and the use of extraneous circumstances. ~ General Decarpentry
                www.reflectionsonriding.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lady Counselor View Post
                  I have not used any of the Ramm fencing, or similar. I really know very little about it. I have a couple more paddocks to build and would like to investigate fencing options.
                  I have the Ramm flex fence as a top rail for my no-climb fence, and I quite like it. The posts need to be very solid, but if they are, the fence has been zero maintenance.

                  I think having tall fences helps too. That was advice that came here from COTH, to do 5' fences, and I think that was right on the money.

                  The no-climb is a PITA to install and I've had some issues with it, mostly because we did not stretch it tightly enough (I was chicken we'd break it). However, we'll do that again for our perimeter fence, to keep dogs in. (And, when we put in the first stretch, to keep the toddler out.) I'm not sure I will use it for ordinary cross-fencing in the future unless I need to keep the small critters out. But it is a great fence.

                  I'm using some Horseguard as well. I love it for easy installation, but in my area, where the grass grows very high very fast in spring, and then the ground is dry dry dry in summer and fall, any kind of electric fencing is actually very high maintenance.
                  If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just wanted to mention that the Horsequard bipolar fencing works anywhere. Because it's not grounded, it stays hot regardless of your ground conditions -- even dry or frozen. Of course, the fence mowing is still an issue.
                    The aids are the legs, the hands, the weight of the rider, the whip, the caress, the voice and the use of extraneous circumstances. ~ General Decarpentry
                    www.reflectionsonriding.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have Centaur HTP for my perimeter fencing and would do that again if I could afford to in any future fencing. But it was expensive, although next time I think we could save by installing ourselves -- we had it done, and that probably doubled the cost, but SO is not that handy and our lack of free time was a big factor in that decision.

                      My cross fencing is Horseguard tape. I like it a lot for that purpose - easy to install, I can move it as needed, and it does work fairly well. But I wouldn't use it for perimeter fencing.

                      We considered no climb or diamond mesh with a top board when we first looked at fencing here, but the downside for us was our terrain. We are on a slope and the ground goes up and down and it would be very difficult to make the wire mesh/board look good in such terrain.

                      I have some wood 3-board fencing at the front of our pasture (short stretches from barn to gates, before the big runs of Centaur start). I hate it. Horses chew on it unless I keep electric on it, I've had a horse get his leg in it (not pretty), and the boards are splitting in spots already and it is just 3 or 4 years old.

                      I despise electric rope fencing, having boarded at places that used it -- every single horse that I had at that barn for any period of time has scars from that stuff. But it was poorly installed (too long stretches between posts, too loose) and rarely maintained. I know some people here love it. But I won't use it.

                      We are putting in some new pasture (if our worker guy ever returns -- our rainy spring sent him into hiding and he hasn't emerged yet!) and what I'm looking at for those areas is just one Centaur HTP top rail (the 4 or 5 inch stuff like I have elsewhere) and then strands of the coated wire (White Lightning, although in our case it is brown) below that. Helps make it more affordable than the multi-rail Centaur that I have, and we can definitely install that ourselves. I think it will look good with the other Centaur and brown Horseguard tape that I have in use, and is safe and easy to maintain.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=horsepoor;4954668]

                        I despise electric rope fencing, having boarded at places that used it -- every single horse that I had at that barn for any period of time has scars from that stuff. But it was poorly installed (too long stretches between posts, too loose) and rarely maintained. I know some people here love it. But I won't use it.

                        QUOTE]

                        There is rope fencing and then there is Electrobraid.....two different products.........we have some fencing companys up here that try to pass off electric rope as the same stuff as Electrobraid....but it differences are like night and day......strength being one of them and the fact that Electrobraid has to be tensioned the rope cannot be tensioned just tightened.......and when Electrobraid is installed properly and NOT used as crossing fencing unless you have a 12' alley between(per manufacturers instructions)....it is the safest fencing I have come across


                        Dalemmma

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Eventaholic View Post
                          Where is your fencing on the property, and what else is around it?

                          I use 3 strands of electrobraid- no cross fencing/perimeter, just two seperate fields. I live in a fairly rural area and both pastures are surrounded 90%+ by 10' wild rose hedges, and then a good several hundred acres of forest on the outside of that... so I feel VERY confident that the horses aren't going ANYWHERE.

                          If I lived in a less rural area or near roads that people actually drove one and didn't have my wonderful rose hedges I would probably put up no-climb or something similar. For me it's just as much fencing for the horses so they don't hurt themselves on the fencing, as it is taking the landscape/setup into mind.
                          I live on five acres in a subdivsion with people on all sides of me some bush some open grass fields. I have no concerns about my horses getting out with the Electrobraid.....it is far to hot...about 10,000 volts for them to even consider touching it.

                          Dalemma

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by easyrider View Post
                            Just wanted to mention that the Horsequard bipolar fencing works anywhere. Because it's not grounded, it stays hot regardless of your ground conditions -- even dry or frozen. Of course, the fence mowing is still an issue.
                            I am going to try the bipolar next time I buy some.
                            If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've got four rail Horserail fencing, which is basically the same sort of thing as Ramm or Centaur. I've had it about three years now, love it to bits.
                              Eileen
                              http://themaresnest.us

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I have two or three (depending on which pasture) strands of electric tape with trees as the majority of my posts. I have an odd set up due to the fact that my property is all heavily wooded. It would be impossible for me to have any type of board fence, because I would be constantly fixing boards that limbs had fallen on. The tape is super easy to fix, visible, cheap and carries a whopper of a charge. I would not, however, use it for a fence along a road or if I had a horse that really challenged the fence.
                                "As soon as you're born you start dyin'
                                So you might as well have a good time"

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Perimeter fence is a "3 board" that has wood board on top and bottom with X in the middle. Fence was here when we bought the place. We added no climb and a strand of Horseguard to the top that is hot.

                                  Existing fence when we bought that place as well was the dividing fence that splits the property into Parcel A and B. This is a fence like you mentioned, no climb with wood on top. So far so good and no complaints. Touch up the top boards every now and then but thats it.

                                  I put up my own cross fencing to make smaller pastures/paddock and it is Horseguard. We bought the pressure treated 4x4 round posts set 4' into the ground. All 3 strands of Horseguard are hot using a 25 mile Solar box.

                                  LOVE my Horseguard. Other than tightening a strand here or there, its been up for 4 years thus far and I have not had ONE problem.
                                  ~~~~~~~~~

                                  Member of the ILMD[FN]HP Clique, The Florida Clique, OMGiH I loff my mares, and the Bareback Riders clique!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    We have a number of different types. We have road frontage on several roads. Near the house we have treated Poplar split rail-much heavier than the typical treated pine split rail. It's been trouble free but I can't find it any more. I wouldn't want it out of sight for days though like a board fence that I trust.

                                    On the road at the back of the farm we have 4 board, 5' high with a #9 aluminum hot wire 4" above the top, 4x4 posts and 2x6 boards. It's also been trouble free.

                                    Between the dog yards and the pastures we have Non-Cimb all the way to the ground. No trouble with it either on treated posts.

                                    We have LOTs of 1/2" tape fences dividing off inside parts, some of it 18 years old (it was put in as "temporary" fence, some on cedar posts and some was installed on landscape timbers) also. I'll never use landscape timbers for anything anymore, although we do have some 15 year old cavellettis I built with them and those are okay, I guess because they never touch the ground. All the landscape timbers in the fence have been replaced by now. This fence is a constant pain in the ass, but I just haven't come up with the time or inclination to bother to replace it other than the time it takes to keep it up. I'll never put up a temporary tape fence again though.

                                    Newer pasture divider fences have been 4 1/2' high three board and those have been no trouble either.
                                    www.HistoricHousePreservation.com

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Beware of that Electrobraid!!

                                      I had 2 horses get wrapped in that stuff and one almost cut his hind leg off, took me, my husband, and the vet all working together at the same time, more than 3 hours to sew him back up...we almost lost him . The other one was not as bad but still ended up with about 30 stitches. The mess won't break, no matter what!! When we got a video of it they had a car suspended in the air with one strand (at the time, I thought that was a good thing), add electricity to the mix and you have a disaster in the making. At the very least, if you already have it up.....don't make it electric!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        We had a customer who bought a boarding facility and replaced but not all of the fencing with our products. A couple of years later she called for more of
                                        Centaur product--her best show mare had gotten a leg caught in the Electrobraid and had degloved her leg to the bone and had to be put down.

                                        We have some Centaur coated wire on T-Posts with the sleeves, some of the
                                        same on the existing pipe posts and a line of Centaur with more waiting if DH
                                        ever gets off his behind.

                                        Due to the economy, this year most of our customers have been ordering coated wire products, electric and non-electric. It used to be like half and half between the rail and the coated wire. And more ordering a top rail with strands of coated wire underneath which is a nice compromise and looks good, too.

                                        And yes, landscape timbers make terrible fence posts!

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