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    Edited because: I recently joined this forum and quickly realized that the envoirment is toxic and I don't want to keep myself in it. It sucks because otherwise this would've been a really awesome forum, but everyone here is a bunch of assholes.

    I used to always come here when I had a tack question or something, so I decided to join, but everyone here seems to not care about actually helping anyone. It's like the English discipline's stereotype of ignorance in a forum.
    Last edited by CPC Grace; Aug. 5, 2017, 12:57 AM.
    it's okay, I hate me too

    #2
    You need to figure out what your costs will be.

    Go look at other facilities in your area.

    You may be in over your head, judging from the points you made in your post.

    Get your place set up and your camel comfortable and go from there.

    BTW is Minnesota a smart place to home a camel? Seems pretty chilly.

    Comment


      #3
      LOCATION is the most important thing here. Minnesota is a big state, and your potential boarder pool drops pretty quickly as you get away from the cities.

      Look around and see what people nearish to you charge. Run the numbers and see if you can supply what you want in that same ballpark.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Sugarwells View Post
        You need to figure out what your costs will be.

        Go look at other facilities in your area.

        You may be in over your head, judging from the points you made in your post.

        Get your place set up and your camel comfortable and go from there.

        BTW is Minnesota a smart place to home a camel? Seems pretty chilly.
        I agree with Sugarwells. Setting up a money making facility is pretty full on. I noticed that you didn't ask about insurance and liability. Build the place for you, enjoy it and maybe visit the idea later on. Camels take skill to handle. They can be really aggressive. They can bite, kick and spit. If you have never met one, the large size of one might take you by surprise. Not an animal for an untrained novice.

        Comment


          #5
          You can charge whatever you want and or need to get. But local market forces will dictate what people will be willing to pay.

          Scope out your competition of like facilities. Call and act like you are looking to board and what they charge and for what.. See how many have a waiting list and for how long. I doubt many will. IMO if the majority of your competition have stalls available you better figure out if you can "one up" them and still make a decent profit. You most likely will be up against well established places anyway. They are a known commodity with a "history" of good service. Word of mouth is why most people call inquiring about boarding.

          I spent a fair bit on advertising when I first opened up. The MAJORITY of people who sent horses here came from referrals They never saw the adds.

          If you have a local horse forum and or FB people ask what people think of so and so's farm. Or get a friend to post the questions for you. This is all standard market research regardless of the "widget".

          DO NOT build a thing with the expectation of getting a STEADY boarding business to service the debt that will be taken on Do not think if you build it they will come. Build something that you can pay for without financial stress. Any boarders you pick up will just be a bonus not a necessity.

          Whether you board 2 horses 10 or more. The commitment is pretty much the same. IMO the in most cases the ends will not justify the means with small operations. Heck, they generally don't with large operations. But they do have the "economy of scale" working for them. The vast majority of people get burnt out and say fork this.

          A boarding business is not much different than owning a restaurant. Both have a high failure rate. Trust me I have done both, lol. At least when I owned a bar and restaurant I mostly had a lot of fun loosing a lot of money. And I always worked inside so nasty weather was never a factor. I could give everybody the week off, turn off the lights, lock the door and hang out a sign that said Gone Fishing.

          Sorry to come off as a Debbie Downer but these are the cold hard facts. "Successful" boarding business are not nearly as "successful" as they may appear to be. Most have some sort of other outside income. And or they are one of a handful that falls under "last man standing".

          Comment


            #6
            Prices largely rely on location. The same stall board we offer for $550 can be $300 in a different location. Also amenities like having an indoor in a location that you would need one in the winter would be very important to someone who rides year round. However it might not matter to a fair weather trail rider.
            Also, when you talk about lots of turnout being the healthiest for horses, you're right, but a heated barn is also NOT healthy for horses. The extreme temp change being turned out and brought into a heated environment can increase respiratory problems, increased humidity allows bacteria to grow. You are much better off insulating your barn and letting the horses do the heating!
            And just a side note, if I was looking at a prospective place to board and the owner was going to dictate to me what kind of bit I could and could not use on my horse, I would run not walk in the other direction. Bits are for hands and not for horses....the hands do the abuse, not the bit. A Snaffle bit can be more abusive than a spade bit in the wrong hands.

            Comment


              #7
              At the rates you're suggesting and given the capital costs of the facility you're planning I suspect you'll be out of business within a year, maybe two. And that's ignoring the draconian rules structure you'll be setting up to ensure "kindness" for the horses. Or the fact that a significant portion of your pasture will be taken up by non-revenue producing animals like pet cows and camels.

              You are certainly free to have whatever kind of facility you wish but the economics of the thing are that you have to provide a service that other people want at a price they are willing to pay. If you're costs are above that price then you are going to run at a perpetual loss (which may be perfectly OK if your non-equine related income is sufficient). If, however, you have a profit motive then you've have a very different problem and will need very different solutions.

              The yellow pad, again, is your friend before you start committing money to the program.

              Good luck in what you are attempting to do.

              G.

              Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raa, Uma Paixo

              Comment


                #8
                Plan on zero boarders.

                After you have your place the way you like it, you can think about boarders, but I suspect you'll realize pretty quickly how much you don't want to take care of other people's animals for approximately 10 dollars per day, before expenses.
                Let me apologize in advance.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Spoiler alert: No Love it.
                  Let me apologize in advance.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by CPC Grace
                    .......................................
                    The barn would be owned by my parents(although I am not an adult, I am the "horse person" in the family and we are actually planning the barn, this isn't some child's stupid fantasy) and the idea is that boarders could pay back for some of our horse expenses. My parents aren't even fully on board with the idea of boarders because we would live on property, we can afford the animals without boarders, they would just help us spoil our animals.......................
                    Doubtful having boarders will pay back very much if anything. It will pay to keep your boarding business running and not a lot else. There is a lot of other expenses that go with having a boarding business, including insurance etc. a cost your parents will have to incur. Not to mention a loss of privacy on their property, all the equipment and work required to maintain and run a boarding business and farm.

                    It's your parents money, their time and their headache, if they aren't on board then I don't think your plans for a boarding barn etc. will be a viable idea.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      You don't tell us what your experience is in the horse industry, if you really know how to run a horse barn and train as a business.

                      To try to learn how to and manage a business in the horse industry will be painful to the one trying and prospective clients and animals that will have to be part of that, without real world experience running a barn and training already on board.
                      Do you have that?

                      Pet animals in a professionally run barn?
                      What you describe sounds more like a hobby farm, which is fine too.
                      May even find some boarders that will like to board in one.

                      I don't know where you are, but around the SW, there are many already turnkey horse operations sitting idle because someone that didn't know what they were getting into decided that was a great way to have fun with the horsey life style and have others pay for it by offering boarding and/or training, without knowing how to manage or train horses or their market for that.
                      Generally that was their daughter's idea, that then moved on with her life later and the parents have those idle facilities left behind.
                      You may want to consider if that is a possibility for you and be proactive how much is prudent for your parents invest on that idea, which may just be ok, we sure don't know that.

                      Want to be a professional in the horse world and really learn how to run a barn and train?

                      If you have not yet, think about becoming a working student to some really good, successful trainer in your discipline of choice and spend a few years learning the trade.

                      Then you can think of opening your own public stable, if you still want to do that.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I would like to hear more about your experience training horses. Especially OTTB's.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                          Want to be a professional in the horse world and really learn how to run a barn and train?

                          If you have not yet, think about becoming a working student to some really good, successful trainer in your discipline of choice and spend a few years learning the trade.

                          Then you can think of opening your own public stable, if you still want to do that.
                          THIS.
                          The fact that you are young is a huge advantage to you right now. You have the opportunity to do as Bluey suggests and work in the industry BEFORE you commit to having your own business with all its' financial and time burdens.

                          And I say this as someone who DID work in several different barns as a young person. I learned a lot, not just about horse care but also about managing time, meeting the needs of a variety of owners, scheduling feed and hay deliveries, vet, farrier, and dentist visits, record keeping, billing, etc, etc. I LOVED it, but realized that it is NOT a viable way to make enough money to live on.

                          I went to college, got a degree, taught school for a while and now own my own business which gives me the flexibility to be able to run my small boarding barn. I am not getting rich but I'm happy.

                          My college age cousin was SURE she wanted to be a horse pro. She had always been a boarder, so she took a gap year and was a working student for a very good, very honest pro. She enjoyed it but came away saying she never worked so hard or was so exhausted in her life. NOT the life she envisioned.

                          She is now back in school studying finance so she can make enough money to afford a nice horse and board it at a nice barn.

                          So, the takeaway here is: get some experience in the industry before you commit. Get a LOT of experience before you commit.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I would like to know how camels are just like big horses.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Keep in mind that even if you only allow "friend" boarders, you are still running a business and will need the same insurance coverage regardless.

                              Personally, I would not want to board at a barn owned by non-horse people and being run by their minor child. And having kept my own horses (up to 4 at once) at home, I can say you will have way more fun and save a ton of money if you just buy ONE horse and board it at your current trainer's barn.

                              Horses at home sounds all glamorous and glorious until you're the one standing in a foot of mud wearing one rubber boot and your pajamas, trying to fix fence in the dark while holding a flashlight in your teeth during a monsoon.

                              Comment


                                #16
                                You may already have investigated this. If so, good for you and please ignore!

                                Before you buy a camel, please be sure you have a local vet who is willing to work on and is knowledgeable about camelids. Around here, many won't work on llamas and alpacas, let alone a camel.

                                Comment

                                  Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by Scarlet Gilia View Post
                                  You may already have investigated this. If so, good for you and please ignore!

                                  Before you buy a camel, please be sure you have a local vet who is willing to work on and is knowledgeable about camelids. Around here, many won't work on llamas and alpacas, let alone a camel.
                                  Yes, we have looked into this, and if we do get a camel, it won't be for a few years after the barn is built probably
                                  it's okay, I hate me too

                                  Comment

                                    Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Calling Duck View Post
                                    I would like to know how camels are just like big horses.
                                    I said that as in that they're very large and rideable, I didn't mean it as in all ways, I guess I was too vague
                                    it's okay, I hate me too

                                    Comment

                                      Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by Heinz 57 View Post
                                      Keep in mind that even if you only allow "friend" boarders, you are still running a business and will need the same insurance coverage regardless.

                                      Personally, I would not want to board at a barn owned by non-horse people and being run by their minor child. And having kept my own horses (up to 4 at once) at home, I can say you will have way more fun and save a ton of money if you just buy ONE horse and board it at your current trainer's barn.

                                      Horses at home sounds all glamorous and glorious until you're the one standing in a foot of mud wearing one rubber boot and your pajamas, trying to fix fence in the dark while holding a flashlight in your teeth during a monsoon.
                                      When I said that we might allow friends to board, I meant that 1 person we know could keep her horse with us for free if she gets one as long as she took care of it and supplied everything herself. The last barn I went to was owned by a family who new nothing about horses and just hired people to do everything for them, they were a 70+ horse facility, well known, and successful, so i don't think everyone agrees with you on that point(plus if you read the whole thing, I already said that we won't be having boarders). We already know that we are going to have horses at our home, but thanks for your input.
                                      it's okay, I hate me too

                                      Comment


                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by CPC Grace View Post

                                        I said that as in that they're very large and rideable, I didn't mean it as in all ways, I guess I was too vague
                                        It is fine to make plans, that is how we can learn what we want and what makes sense.

                                        It is good for anyone making future plans to keep in mind the old, "we can have "anything" we want, we can't have "everything" we want".

                                        Life is all about making choices and deciding what we, from all out there, really want.
                                        That is why we make plans.

                                        Looks like you will do fine, keep planing and asking questions.
                                        The more we plan, the more we think, the better prepared we will be to decide what is best for us.

                                        Comment

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