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Rebuilding barn doors

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  • Rebuilding barn doors

    The sliders in the barn are badly warped and need to be rebuilt and replaced, and I'm having a bear of a time finding someone who can do it. Who would you call? We don't have the equipment to do it ourselves.

    Bonus if anyone has a contact in the CT area who will actually return a call or produce a bid.

  • #2
    do not know anything about these people but they have three locations in CT, web site looks nice

    http://www.thebarnyardstore.com/blog/detail/?id=257

    Comment


    • #3
      We rehung and rebuilt our sliding barn doors one time to many, then put overhead doors in and all we wonder since is, why did we not do that sooner?

      If overhead doors fit your barn, consider them a way better mousetrap for big barn doors than sliders, any day.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sliders are easy to built and put up. Any half assed handyman should be able whip a pair out in a day. I built and hung the ones pictured by myself. Because they hang off off the track on big roller brackets it only requires a simple frame

        I built the frame, bolted the roller brackets (they should unbolt from the rollers in the tract) on and lifted up into place without the board and battens. It is MUCH lighter. Held it in place with the bucket of my tractor. Shimmed up the bottom for proper clearance. Slide the rollers into place and re-bolted the door brackets to the roller in the tract, 1 adjustable bolt. Bobs your uncle hung nicely.

        Nailed the board and battens on while hanging. Easy job with a ladder, even easier with a roller scaffold. I bought the scaffold at Harbor Freight on sale for $125. Worth every cent. Has MANY uses.

        These doors are going on 15 years. Never have given me any hassles or in need of R&M

        This barn came with large overhead doors that were around 15+ years old. They were always in need of some adjustment, greasing etc. Total pain in the butt in the winter with freeze, melt weather. They would freeze fast to the ground. A real PITA and sometimes very time consuming to free up.

        One of the springs broke and that was a nightmare. Way too heavy for one person to lift up and prop open. When closed and frozen almost impossible to get open. Very expensive to get repaired. Very expensive to have new ones installed. Building new sliders cost a fraction.

        Plus for me I never liked the look of them. Made my barn look like a warehouse or truck garage. Different barns, different look of the barn, different tastes, different weather conditions they maybe just fine. To each their own on these.
        Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0298.JPG Views:	1 Size:	15.6 KB ID:	9817262


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        • #5
          I hate overhead doors. I'm replacing all of mine with sliders. They are hard to open when you have a horse in hand, and the overhead movement scares a lot of horses especially when they're up close like that. They can be heavy to lift with one hand (I always find myself with a horse on the end of a lead rope when I'm trying to open an overhead door for some reason). They freeze shut. The springs can break. Garage door openers don't always work, and they can hang down too far and be a danger to horse heads. And the tracks are easily damaged or clogged with dust/dirt.

          Sliders have their own sets of issues, too, but the simple act of opening them when I'm leading a horse makes them my first choice.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by gumtree View Post
            Sliders are easy to built and put up. Any half assed handyman should be able whip a pair out in a day. I built and hung the ones pictured by myself. Because they hang off off the track on big roller brackets it only requires a simple frame

            I built the frame, bolted the roller brackets (they should unbolt from the rollers in the tract) on and lifted up into place without the board and battens. It is MUCH lighter. Held it in place with the bucket of my tractor. Shimmed up the bottom for proper clearance. Slide the rollers into place and re-bolted the door brackets to the roller in the tract, 1 adjustable bolt. Bobs your uncle hung nicely.

            Nailed the board and battens on while hanging. Easy job with a ladder, even easier with a roller scaffold. I bought the scaffold at Harbor Freight on sale for $125. Worth every cent. Has MANY uses.

            These doors are going on 15 years. Never have given me any hassles or in need of R&M

            This barn came with large overhead doors that were around 15+ years old. They were always in need of some adjustment, greasing etc. Total pain in the butt in the winter with freeze, melt weather. They would freeze fast to the ground. A real PITA and sometimes very time consuming to free up.

            One of the springs broke and that was a nightmare. Way too heavy for one person to lift up and prop open. When closed and frozen almost impossible to get open. Very expensive to get repaired. Very expensive to have new ones installed. Building new sliders cost a fraction.

            Plus for me I never liked the look of them. Made my barn look like a warehouse or truck garage. Different barns, different look of the barn, different tastes, different weather conditions they maybe just fine. To each their own on these.
            Click image for larger version Name:	IMG_0298.JPG Views:	1 Size:	15.6 KB ID:	9817262

            That freezing onto the ground in the winter was one of our problems with the sliders, we had to use our tamping bar to pry them loose.
            We had two on each end of the quonset barn built in 1957 and finally had to take the one on the West side completely off, the wind just kept blowing it off and we closed that wall up.
            The same with our hay barn doors.

            The quonset sliders were two metal 9' wide and 14' high for each door, which may be why they were, even properly framed and hung, just very large doors to try to slide.

            Sliding doors of all kinds are not very ergonomic.
            Humans are not really made to slide heavier loads sideways, the shoulder blade attachment not suited.
            Many end up with back pain from those efforts, we did.

            Once overhead doors were manufactured, those problems were eliminated.
            We now have two 18' wide and 14' high doors, one on each end.
            We opened the back wall and it is a door again.

            We have not had the overhead doors, that have brushes on the sides, freeze at all.
            They are on a chain hoist, manually operated and so light to open and close a kid can do that.

            Overhead doors are not the prettiest out there, but today they have many models that look like barn doors, or carriage house doors, if someone wants a certain look to them.

            Since we found out how well they work, that is all we have, every place, for over 20 years now, no more fighting sliding doors for us.

            I understand that everyone has their preferences and different regions have their own challenges, so those may not work for someone else, but they sure are wonderful for our needs.
            Just more to consider, for those wondering which doors to put on their barns.

            The first picture was taken during a dust storm a few years ago, the second one is of the door we put on the addition we built, that door is 14' wide and 12' tall:



            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Gumtree, I so wish you were closer! (Although you are probably safer with distance. I would be picking your brain all the time!)

              These doors are tall--10 feet? Maybe 12? We just don't have the tools to build or hang. They might have been done incorrectly in the first place and need new hardware...we just don't know.

              clanter, thanks for the link! Will call them

              bluey, overheads aren't doable for a lot of reasons here. Really need sliders.

              Comment


              • #8
                Simikie... if you can, have the sliders mounted inside the building as digging the snow/ice away from the doors during a blizzard is no fun.... or at least have a separate personal door which opens inward this personal door can be in the slider itself. I used to live in Kentucky and still remember the winters of the late 1970s when everything froze and all the horse farms could not get any of the slide doors open as they were all on the outside.

                About overhead doors: Springs are just like horses, there are many variations. Spring are "Rated" for a certain number of cycles (Open/Close is a cycle). The current "standard residential spring" is rated as low as 5,000 cycles whereas commercial are about 15,000 cycles. You can get springs that are rated up to 100,000 cycles. When we had our overhead door company a standard spring was rated 25,000 cycles but in this day and age the manufacturers continue to reduce costs by reducing the quality without changing the appearance The doors themselves... a steel door used to always be 24 ga as the base, heavier longer lasting doors where heavier gauges ie 20 ga or 16 ga but now residential overhead doors can be found to be as light as 29 go which is almost like unrolling some aluminum foil

                And regarding Bluey's blowing out door there are now hurricane locks which are basically an interior mounted support that increases the wind-load capability of the door panel greatly. Depending on the door size and the expected winds there can be one or more of these hurricane supports installed. Bluey's location in the Texas panhandle is a high wind risk area, it is not uncommon to have 80 MPH winds. Another addition to increase wind-load ability would be add additional U channels to the door panels but if this is done after a door is install the springs would need to be changed to match the total door weight...you just can not add a few turns to the springs to offset the increased load. A properly sprung and balanced residential door should require no more than 10 pounds of force to either open or close the door and a door should be able to stopped at any point of travel and remain in position. (Same for commercial but greater force may be required...really depends upon overall door size and lift.)

                Standard overhead doors, residential or commercial, are on 2 inch rollers and track.... large commercial doors should be using 3 inch Rollers are also not created equally..the 2 inch can be poly or steel...the poly are quieter but support less weigh. The steel 2 inch rollers can be on 7 bearings or 10 bearings, the seven is lower quality and cheaper than the ten bearing. Three inch commercial will be steel

                Overhead doors (Residential or Commercial) can be installed on optional tracks which can have high lift (which provides greater interior clearance to provide more clearance within the structure. Or a "Follow the Roof Line" track can be used ... either option can still be motorized. (Sliding doors can also be motorized... and a single operator can be used to open/close a set of bi-parting sliders)

                An alternative may be a coiling door... which is similar to but is not the cheap "sheet doors" you see at a mini-warehouse. A coiling steel door will be expensive but often is a better choice in many applications as everything is contained above the door's header

                A sheet door is light weight gauge steel curtain and is prone to being blown out even if has what are called wind locks (may be called wind clips) which are supposed to hold the curtain in the guides.

                And there are other variations.

                What ever you do price will be a concern (usually) but as you go less expensive normally the overall quality is lessened substituted lower quality panels or parts. If just doing a visual inspection in most cases you will not know the difference as the side-by-side appearance of a cheap item verses the higher quality item will often appear to be the same. So use a company that has a verifiable reputation that will stand by its work.

                back to sliding doors... the door hardware... the standard stuff you see at TSC or a box store is light weight... Do Not Exceed its rated weight capability other wise expect problems. There are track/roller assemblies that can be used on doors exceeding 10,000 pounds... again I refer you to the Richards-Wilcox hardware... they have a 888 track/hardware that will allow a person to move a very heavy door with little effort
                Last edited by clanter; Jul. 19, 2017, 07:50 AM.

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