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large perimeter invisible fence

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  • large perimeter invisible fence

    After having a neighbor bring back my little doxie mix from almost a half mile away, he is grounded from being allowed to go outside unattended. He stays in the house or goes on supervised walks. It is the country, but people drive faster and faster on the county road.

    I am getting estimates for a chain link yard for him and his sister-dog (mini doxie), but am also considering a large area perimeter "invisible fence". The kind where they wear the colllars and get a shock if they cross the line. Has anyone done a really big one? They have to be in a closed loop right? Do they work? Can little guys wear the collars? He is 17 pounds and the mini dox is 10 pounds.
    Rest in peace Claudius, we will miss you.

  • #2
    I haven't done a buried-wire kind, but the wireless one works pretty well for my labrador. It encloses a circular area 180 feet in diameter, which is plenty for her to wander around. She's 8 or 9, so not a wildly active puppy any more. The collar is sort of bulky, but she's a big dog--not sure if they have smaller sizes for little ones. She tests it--when the battery dies she is GONE to the neighbor's back porch--but it holds her perfectly if I keep up with battery changes.
    Click here before you buy.

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    • #3
      A good fence does two things: it keeps something in and everything else out (or vice versa).

      The "invisible fence" does one thing, sometimes. As such it fails the "good fence test."

      Put up a good fence and you'll be more pleased with the result.

      G.
      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

      Comment


      • #4
        I have about 12 acres fenced in the Dog Guard brand of invisible fencing. So long as the dogs are wearing the collar (and it has a working battery) it works beautifully. My farm has 3 board fence, so I did not want to add any other to it, but I want to keep my dogs in.

        It does not keep other dogs out, that is true, but it does keep my 4 in. I have 3 Cardigan Welsh Corgis and a labrador.

        If one of them forgets that the collar zaps, I have been known to shave the neck where the prongs are, and then re-introduce them to the zap.

        I have a neighbor who has the Invisible Fence brand, and does not seem to care if her dogs come & go, and those dogs are the most frequent visitors. Well, the one that is left. The other became road pizza recently. And the replacement dog seems to like chickens, so I think that the fence might get fixed and the collars actually used with live batteries.

        Comment


        • #5
          Invisible Fence

          I have used their systems on several properties......Currently I have three plus acres under coverage surrounded by "Dog temptations"......I have a English Setter and a young French Brittany Spaniel and they have never crossed the barrier in three years....
          Berkley

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          • #6
            Can anyone give an estimate on how much a big area would cost - an acre or two?? I am also thinking about this for my two dogs in GA. thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Guilherme View Post
              A good fence does two things: it keeps something in and everything else out (or vice versa).

              The "invisible fence" does one thing, sometimes. As such it fails the "good fence test."

              Put up a good fence and you'll be more pleased with the result.

              G.
              Not to pick on you, but I really think that logic is hugely flawed.

              We have and maintain about 3 miles of 4 board wood fencing. It keeps my horses in. I suppose it would keep other horses out. But It doesn't do a thing for dogs (mine or the various hunting dogs that come through), deer, varmints, or any of the indigenous predators in this area. Is there such a fence that would?

              I can think of no fence besides my underground electric dog fence that would keep my dog in other than a chain-link kennel with both the top and bottom sealed.

              I love our Dog guard fence. For less than a $1000 we had about 4 acres enclosed, professionally installed and the dog professionally trained. It was worth every penny, works great and is by far the lowest cost installation and maintenance of any fence I've ever had.

              We've had it about a year through more rain, snow and mess than we've ever had. It's done great.

              SCFarm
              The above post is an opinion, just an opinion. If it were a real live fact it would include supporting links to websites full of people who already agreed with me.

              www.southern-cross-farm.com

              Comment


              • #8
                we have about 100 acres total in wire mesh horse fence and one opening, the front gate. Somehow my dogs managed to decide that 100 acres aren't suitable and continually ran out the front gate. I purchased the Pet Safe Invisible Fence and made a loop to include about 10 acres. I installed the fence myself and have been very pleased with the results. The dogs are very happy and safe. I have 2 hunting dog types and they did require the 'stubborn dog' collar to respect the fence.
                "ronnie was the gifted one, victor was the brilliant intellect, and i [GM], well, i am the plodder."

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                • #9
                  My barn has roughly 8 acres of pasture surrounded by invisible fencing. The fencing intended to restrain the grazing animals is a mixture of cattle panels, rails, and chain link, depending on the occupants. The invisible fencing wire is clipped onto the solid fencing, so I guess it's actually visible. (You just have to pretend you can't see it ) Although the wire must be a continuous loop, you can create no-zap zones by doubling the wire back on itself and twisting it together. The electrical interference caused by the twisting cancels out the signal to the collar. At our barn the twisted sections run over the barn door and under a couple of the gates. I bought heavier wires than the kit originally came with when we restrung the wire a while ago. I figured the heavier wire would handle the weather better. Also, heavier wire has less resistance. Resistance isn't a big deal for short loops, but it adds up when you've got around a mile of wire.

                  In answer to Guilherme's observation that a good fence keeps things both in and out - well, there ain't no fence designed by mortals that can keep our farm dogs in when they want to be out. These guys can climb ladders into the hay loft! Climbing over or tunneling under a fence is easy by comparison. The invisible fence wire has reduced their Count of Monte Cristo antics substantially. They'll still scrunch up their eyes against the zap and bolt through an open gate if given the opportunity, but they won't spend the 3-10 minutes needed to climb or dig while they're wearing the shock collars.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have the Petsafe Radio fence - no wires to install. It covers enough of my yard for my dog to run around but does keep him in. (Unlike a wired fence, if he goes outside the perimeter he gets a continuous zap for quite a few seconds which convinces him to get back inside the zap-free zone. This has only happened once, he no longer challenges the fence.) If you want more coverage you can buy 2 units and set them up in different places. As long as the signal intercept each other the dogs can pass from one zone to another. My only issue is that their collars only seem to last about a year and then we have to replace them, which is pricey but in general we are very happy with the fence.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I hate 'invisible' fences in the 'burbs, but I can see their usefulness on a farm where you have very large ares you'd like to enclose. I would be wary of predators, particularly since the OP's dog are small.

                      Originally posted by carp View Post
                      The invisible fence wire has reduced their Count of Monte Cristo antics substantially.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Invisible fence

                        We have 10 acres enclosed in Invisible fence. The fencing includes trees lawn, part of our lane and goes to the door or the barn. It excludes access to the barn and the baby pastures and arena. Our pack, Airedales, Rat terriers and Borzoi love having such access to be outdoors with me all day.They sit and watch the barn while I tack up, ultrasound mares, prepare feed, etc. They escort me to the arena and then sit by the gate while I ride. Only problem was when a utility vehicle severed one of the lines below the house, but the beeping of the receiver alerts you there is a problem. Locating the break on this big a fence took a little time. If I had known how well it would work I would have done it years ago.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          dog fence

                          I have used underground dog fence for over 20 years on two farms. I did not burying the fence but attached it to my horse fence . Thats easy to put up and also very easy to find a break compared to a buried wire fence. After a hurricane we had to do repair and it was easy with the wire on the board fence. Also i used old hose and put the wire thru the hose and buried that under the gates and driveway . it lasted forever.
                          I think you just need to be serious and consistent when training your dogs to the fence. Once they are trained to it it is best to tempt them to make sure they are trained. Anything they love to chase will work as a test.
                          dogs are smart, they know if the fence is on, if the collar is working. I used this fence with hounds who respected it however my Chesapeake bay would go through the fence if I was walking away. You could see her grit her teeth and decide to take the shock just to follow me. She would not do that if I rode or drove away, she was just determined to stay with me on the ground. I gave up and either put her in a stall or took her walking with me. The other dogs always stayed in the fence. Also the cats learned the fence and would tease the dogs always staying on the safe side.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            he is grounded from being allowed to go outside unattended. He stays in the house or goes on supervised walks.
                            Excuse me, but isn't this what you do with a dog without an invisible fence?? What did you do, let it out to wander on its own? You have two choices. Either you accompany the dog, as a wolf pack would, and by example not allow it to cross the boundary, yet allow it to pee on THIS side of the boundary, or, you make an invisible fence, which is the lazy man's way of supervising its dog.

                            I have never had a dog which left my property. That is because when I am at home I am aware of where it is, and call it away from crossing the boundary when it approaches it. Its not a hard lesson to learn. By the age of 5 they stay in the yard. At least when I am at home. The good ones stay in the yard and WAIT for me to get home. I haven't yet needed an invisible fence nor had one wander.

                            You nailed it in your orignal post. he needs to be attendeed or suprvised. If you let him out unsupervised when he needs supervision, you either need to spend time with your dog or get an invisible fence.

                            What your boundaries are (for the fence) is dictated by what the boundaries are which you teach him as a person. If you walk with him in a 2 mile perimeter, you can bet that if you create a 20 meter invisible fence, he will try to find a way beyond it. His personal boundary is the 2 mile perimeter you showed him. YOU are the one to teach him, not an invisible fence. If you teach him, he won't need it, and I am preaching from the point of view of a hungarian sheep dog and a border collie/flat coated retriever mix. These are moving animals. Their personal boundaries are within a mile of me.

                            You have to show the dog what his boundaries are. If you make an invisible fence his boundary, he will only try to cross it in order to establish the boundary he thinks YOU gave him.

                            YOU are his alpha. YOU have to spend the time (months, years) hypervigilent about his movements, like a mother wolf would be. Like you would be with your child. If you dont', then you can't have a dog, because they need the time with you to learn. You can't have a dog and let some technology be its teacher. They learn from the being they bond with. You have to bond with the dog and walk the perimeter and never let them see you cross it. They learn from you, not from electrical collars.
                            Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Another round, I read the two sentences of what promised to be your little personal sermon, and went no further. The dog posts on this horse forum are the preachiest of any of them! No wonder there is a sticky at the top about keeping it farm related. Your diatribe about dog training is not.

                              Thank you to the other persons replying. Very helpful for a large acreage issue.
                              Rest in peace Claudius, we will miss you.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by LLDM View Post
                                Not to pick on you, but I really think that logic is hugely flawed.

                                We have and maintain about 3 miles of 4 board wood fencing. It keeps my horses in. I suppose it would keep other horses out. But It doesn't do a thing for dogs (mine or the various hunting dogs that come through), deer, varmints, or any of the indigenous predators in this area. Is there such a fence that would?

                                I can think of no fence besides my underground electric dog fence that would keep my dog in other than a chain-link kennel with both the top and bottom sealed.

                                I love our Dog guard fence. For less than a $1000 we had about 4 acres enclosed, professionally installed and the dog professionally trained. It was worth every penny, works great and is by far the lowest cost installation and maintenance of any fence I've ever had.

                                We've had it about a year through more rain, snow and mess than we've ever had. It's done great.

                                SCFarm
                                No, the logic is quite sound. The concept is sound. It's the "one way fence thinking" that is illogical.

                                Board fencing is pretty, but not always optimal for containment of every type of critter. Seems to me that a wise and responsible property owner sets up their fences to meet the requirements of the stock to be contained (or the intruders to be kept out).

                                Board fence, for example, can do pretty well with horses but is much less useful for cattle, goats, sheep, pigs, chickens, dogs, or cats. Don't know how it would do with ratite birds or llamas. Its utility can be increased with the addition of appropriate electric wire and a good quality charger. The point is that the fence should be able to do its two jobs in a reasonable fashion. It's up to the human to figure out how to do that.

                                I've also seen "invisible" fences fail pretty miserably when the confined animals are "motivated" to pass through the "zone of pain" they utilize. A dog will take some pain to get to a bitch in heat. A bitch in heat will do the same to get to a dog. A sight hound in a full run will pass through the "pain zone" and not even slow down. A collared dog getting caught up in "pack behavior" can also just disregard the pain of the collar.

                                Folks are free to use what they want, but that doesn't change the wisdom of the thought that All Fences Have Two Purposes.

                                G.

                                P.S. And remember, too, the words of Robert Frost: Good fences make good neighbors.
                                Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Pretty much how I look at fences as well. My horses and dogs need a solid barrier which keeps out MOST bad things ( other folks loose animals around here). Invisible fence is good in many ways, but will NOT protect my dogs from wandering ones who have no collars to keep out of the property. And if the electric goes out? No protection at all in keeping the dogs home which a true barrier fence gives in most cases, for short times anyway.

                                  My wire perimeter fence keeps the horses in, other livestock out, and I don't have worries that deer might kill the fence by running thru it, letting the horses out like the tape or strand of wire only fence. Fence is clearly visible for the horses if the power should be out for some reason.

                                  So a fence needs to be that 2 purpose device, to be a real fence to me. Keeps my stuff inside, keeps other things (people, dogs, loose livestock, snowmobilers. hikers) outside. That requires visible, solid perimeters to my choice of fencing, with the additional use of electricty to prevent equines or bovines from even trying or testing the fences.

                                  Have seen and heard of too many pets who were killed when the invisible fences failed, to have it here. I will stick with wire to contain the dogs.

                                  And taking 5 YEARS to train the dog to stay home!?! Useless methods, VERY stupid dog or he just doesn't care to learn. Not much training being done there! Along with poster not having a CLUE what dogs with no fence do while they are gone. Stay home all the time? Quite unlikely!! Just haven't been caught running yet. No, we don't run a wolf pack here (weird analogy), but the dogs we have are trained, obedient, PREVENTED from being a problem with a GOOD, visible fence. I KNOW they are where I leave them, inside the fence, when I go away. Will still be inside the fence waiting for me, when I get home.

                                  Originally posted by Guilherme View Post
                                  No, the logic is quite sound. The concept is sound. It's the "one way fence thinking" that is illogical.

                                  Board fencing is pretty, but not always optimal for containment of every type of critter. Seems to me that a wise and responsible property owner sets up their fences to meet the requirements of the stock to be contained (or the intruders to be kept out).

                                  Board fence, for example, can do pretty well with horses but is much less useful for cattle, goats, sheep, pigs, chickens, dogs, or cats. Don't know how it would do with ratite birds or llamas. Its utility can be increased with the addition of appropriate electric wire and a good quality charger. The point is that the fence should be able to do its two jobs in a reasonable fashion. It's up to the human to figure out how to do that.

                                  I've also seen "invisible" fences fail pretty miserably when the confined animals are "motivated" to pass through the "zone of pain" they utilize. A dog will take some pain to get to a bitch in heat. A bitch in heat will do the same to get to a dog. A sight hound in a full run will pass through the "pain zone" and not even slow down. A collared dog getting caught up in "pack behavior" can also just disregard the pain of the collar.

                                  Folks are free to use what they want, but that doesn't change the wisdom of the thought that All Fences Have Two Purposes.

                                  G.

                                  P.S. And remember, too, the words of Robert Frost: Good fences make good neighbors.

                                  Comment

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