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stupid question? hot water and hoses?

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  • stupid question? hot water and hoses?

    So I have what may very well be a stupid question, but I'm aware of that so it's ok. If you remember from any of my posts we do not and will not have water in our barn this winter. Yuck. It's 150' ish from the house (spigot inside the garage). I am fully prepared to use gas jugs to tote water, but... I was hoping there might be a better solution to use at least part of the time. We only have two horses (thank god), but it would be nice every couple of days to fill up the troughs. The spigot is right above the hot water heater in the basement. It comes up through a closet right next to the garage and all of the pipes are exposed, but still in the house. If it's fairly reasonably priced to get hot water to that spigot, will it be hot enough to not freeze in a hose if I drag a hose outside from the garage to the barn? Basically I'd have 150'-ish of hose outside potentially in snow but with hot water through it. Would that still freeze? The garage isn't heated, but I can pull the hose right into the mudroom or something.

    On the same note... I posted this in the heated hose thread but didn't get any answers. I see the heated hoses are only 50' max, but the actual electric part is 6'. Will it not heat up enough to connect a hose onto it? So the heated part is strong enough only to heat that 50'?

  • #2
    Running water should not freeze in a hose, even if it is not heated. Our water to the barn usually froze in the winter (in Michigan) because the pipes were not buried deep enough. We would use a sled to pull buckets of warm water from the house. We would also use a hose run from an outside spigot at the house.

    Be sure to wrap the spigot and any exposed pipe with a heat tape. After you use the hose, you need to drain it. I use to drag it up over the clothes line pole to get the water out. Then, you probably do need to take the hose in to somewhere heated, unless it is a heavy duty hose. My current barn has a slope down the aisle (it is an old tobacco barn converted to a horse barn). The slope is wonderful because it makes sure everything drains well. When I am done watering, I just lay the hose out straight in the aisle and it drains itself. Make sure not to leave the hose attached to the spigot, because it may cause the spigot to freeze and fail (been there and done that).

    Good luck, and I'm sorry that you have to carry water!

    Comment


    • #3
      Call or go to a plumbing supply company for information and hoses.
      Those guys are always willing to help us solve problems, and the advice is free of charge in the store when you are buying something.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dmalbone View Post
        So I have what may very well be a stupid question, but I'm aware of that so it's ok. If you remember from any of my posts we do not and will not have water in our barn this winter. Yuck. It's 150' ish from the house (spigot inside the garage). I am fully prepared to use gas jugs to tote water, but... I was hoping there might be a better solution to use at least part of the time. We only have two horses (thank god), but it would be nice every couple of days to fill up the troughs. The spigot is right above the hot water heater in the basement. It comes up through a closet right next to the garage and all of the pipes are exposed, but still in the house. If it's fairly reasonably priced to get hot water to that spigot, will it be hot enough to not freeze in a hose if I drag a hose outside from the garage to the barn? Basically I'd have 150'-ish of hose outside potentially in snow but with hot water through it. Would that still freeze? The garage isn't heated, but I can pull the hose right into the mudroom or something.

        On the same note... I posted this in the heated hose thread but didn't get any answers. I see the heated hoses are only 50' max, but the actual electric part is 6'. Will it not heat up enough to connect a hose onto it? So the heated part is strong enough only to heat that 50'?
        Sounds like we lug water the same distance and for the same amount of animals. I have had the hose freeze solid before I can get it back into the house several times. WArm water running through it does stop this. I do it as quick as i can though. Right now I am lugging jugs again because the hose cracked. I am now speaking with ppl at Hydrohose. They are constructing me a hose that is 150 foot long. They have the flat lightweight hoses. Weighs only 10 lbs, big difference from teh one I have here. I am also getting one of those heated muck buckets. And the hydrohose hose is good in the cold down to -30 f. It is going to cost a bit, but if it will allow me to stop lugging water with my spine disease it will be worth it.

        I don't know anything much about the heated hose.

        Comment


        • #5
          you can get a sled ( if there is snow) or a cart with a small tank water resevoir on it and its easier than carrying buckets. Fill the resevoir with 10 or 20 gallons of hot water from the spigot and drag it to the barn. I've also seen them mounted to be pulled by a small quad or lawn tractor.

          The hose will not freeze while the water is running , hot or cold, but, the hose itself will get quite cold as soon as the water stops running and will be hard to coil back up neatly. Also, unless you keep the water running 24/7 in freezing weather, the water remaining in the hose will freeze solid. So if you elect to use a hose, make sure you disconnect it from the spigot and drain it every time you use it. ( which is a pain) Get a heavy duty real black rubber hose of a continuous length ( if you can find a 150 ft length!) if you are running hot water- they have hot water rated hoses. They are not cheap. We paid about $100 for our 100 ft hose of this type, but it lasted 10 years under adverse conditions. Anything made of plastic or vinyl will break down with freezing weather or hot water running in it.

          Next spring, have a plumbing contractor come and run an underground line off the spigot to your barn. I end up having to carry a small amount of hot water from the house to the barn to unfreeze the taps in cold weather, but no longer have to carry steaming buckets ( which invariably end up splashing on my runners and leaving them cold!) the 100 feet from our house to the barn.

          This week, we had about 4 days of -2 C weather ( that would be about 28 F) and my pond froze solid after the first day, so I imagine any trough will freeze solid even quicker. For a couple of days I was filling buckets with warm water at night and dumping solid ice in the morning in the stalls.
          "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF

          Comment


          • #6
            Here a walk-behind trencher rents for $45 a half day. 150 feet is maybe a 15 minute job unless you have lots of big rocks-but we don't have that information or location so it's just a guess.

            PVC pipe is about as cheap as the dirt the trencher will throw out.
            www.HistoricHousePreservation.com

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by Tom King View Post
              Here a walk-behind trencher rents for $45 a half day. 150 feet is maybe a 15 minute job unless you have lots of big rocks-but we don't have that information or location so it's just a guess.

              PVC pipe is about as cheap as the dirt the trencher will throw out.
              Yeah, I know it sounds simple but we have no idea what to do after that. For one it will have to cross our phone line (don't know what to do there), then we have to bust up the concrete sidewalk that runs next to the house to get underneath it. Then we have to tap into the water in the house (absolutely no idea how to do that) on top of actually hooking the hydrant up (again... no idea how to do that). On top of that we have so many barn projects to try and finish still that we just physically don't have the time. Around here a walk-behind trencher is $100 for a 1/2 day and $20 to bring it and pick it up since we have no way to. I wish it were as easy for us as it sounds. I got 2 quotes (should have gotten more... was just discouraged). One was $960 WITHOUT trenching, the other was $1000 total. Just don't have that right now.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dmalbone View Post
                Yeah, I know it sounds simple but we have no idea what to do after that. For one it will have to cross our phone line (don't know what to do there), then we have to bust up the concrete sidewalk that runs next to the house to get underneath it. Then we have to tap into the water in the house (absolutely no idea how to do that) on top of actually hooking the hydrant up (again... no idea how to do that). On top of that we have so many barn projects to try and finish still that we just physically don't have the time. Around here a walk-behind trencher is $100 for a 1/2 day and $20 to bring it and pick it up since we have no way to. I wish it were as easy for us as it sounds. I got 2 quotes (should have gotten more... was just discouraged). One was $960 WITHOUT trenching, the other was $1000 total. Just don't have that right now.
                Yea.. it's really not that easy (as the other poster implied) and you can mess things up really badly really quickly!

                I have almost the same situation in the barn/field that i'm renting currently. I decided to have the water line installed and it cost $1600 to go from the carriage house (where the well and pump was) to the barn and another spout in the field.

                It cost more that planned because they rented a trencher but the ground was too soft and muddy so it kept getting stuck. They had to use a back hoe but the job got done and I have water!

                No solution as far as heated hose, if you look at some of the websites where you can buy them you can ask questions so you should be able to figure out if it will suit your needs

                http://www.gemplers.com/product/1631...ne-Heated-Hose

                then click "product support"
                http://www.clarkdesigngrouparchitects.com/index.html - Lets build your dream barn

                Comment


                • #9
                  I bought a heated hose (ThermoHose) a few weeks ago, and I love it. I plug it in for 15 minutes while I am feeding the horses. Then, I turn on the water and the hose is thawed. No more draining the hose every night, and wondering if I inadvertently left some water in it.

                  I googled the hose to find the best prices. There was a big difference in prices between various catalogues.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm where we get REAL winter, and I have 175' of hose that I drag around for watering every day, and drain it every day, all winter. It's not that hard, and for 11 horses, it beats carrying water in buckets by about five million miles.

                    Mine is just an ordinary hose, not the cheapest vinyl/plasticy stuff, but not super high grade rubber either. I don't bring it inside or coil it up or anything -- just drain it good (put it going downhill and hand-over-hand it at shoulder height starting at the faucet end, then blow through it to see if it's clear -- if not, drain it again) and let it lay. I have to be careful to not leave it where a horse might step on it or somebody might drive over it, because it will crack then, if it's cold enough.

                    If you only had to fill tanks every other day or so, it wouldn't be much more than a minor nuisance, once you figure out how to do it. If your spigot is higher than your tank, it will be real easy: put end in tank, attach other end to spigot, run water, turn off water, unhook from spigot, drain into tank, remove end from tank. If your tank is not lower than your spigot, then it's easiest is to move the tank end of the hose to someplace that IS lower than the spigot (and you don't mind having ice build-up). If you don't dilly dally around with your draining, you shouldn't have any trouble with it freezing up on you unless it's about 20*F below zero.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I thought this looked pretty damned clever:

                      www.h2gobag.co.uk

                      Cheap enough that it might be worth getting one shipped to you?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hot water will wreck regular garden hose.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by AKB View Post
                          I bought a heated hose (ThermoHose) a few weeks ago, and I love it. I plug it in for 15 minutes while I am feeding the horses. Then, I turn on the water and the hose is thawed. No more draining the hose every night, and wondering if I inadvertently left some water in it.

                          I googled the hose to find the best prices. There was a big difference in prices between various catalogues.
                          How long is it? My problem is that I need to go a long way. I'd love a heated hose that long!

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Originally posted by atr View Post
                            I thought this looked pretty damned clever:

                            www.h2gobag.co.uk

                            Cheap enough that it might be worth getting one shipped to you?
                            That is pretty neat. Don't know if it would work on a sled though if there's snow on the ground.

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Originally posted by greysandbays View Post
                              I'm where we get REAL winter, and I have 175' of hose that I drag around for watering every day, and drain it every day, all winter. It's not that hard, and for 11 horses, it beats carrying water in buckets by about five million miles.

                              Mine is just an ordinary hose, not the cheapest vinyl/plasticy stuff, but not super high grade rubber either. I don't bring it inside or coil it up or anything -- just drain it good (put it going downhill and hand-over-hand it at shoulder height starting at the faucet end, then blow through it to see if it's clear -- if not, drain it again) and let it lay. I have to be careful to not leave it where a horse might step on it or somebody might drive over it, because it will crack then, if it's cold enough.

                              If you only had to fill tanks every other day or so, it wouldn't be much more than a minor nuisance, once you figure out how to do it. If your spigot is higher than your tank, it will be real easy: put end in tank, attach other end to spigot, run water, turn off water, unhook from spigot, drain into tank, remove end from tank. If your tank is not lower than your spigot, then it's easiest is to move the tank end of the hose to someplace that IS lower than the spigot (and you don't mind having ice build-up). If you don't dilly dally around with your draining, you shouldn't have any trouble with it freezing up on you unless it's about 20*F below zero.
                              Nice to know. My tank is actually below the spigot. There's a small hill, but big enough to help it out a little bit of the way. Here's a pic (Ignore the mess behind the house)http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_8HhPXVaZn9...h/IMG_3473.JPG

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Hey, you have the same problem as me, we fill up 5 gallon buckets we used a cart or snowmoble to carry Misty her water, but I have come up with a way of doing this without carrying water. We have water in our basement just like you and I have a 100' hose that I now use, I leave my hose outside all year and have it laying flat (always), I water Misty with cold water and bought a electric pancake aircompressor from harbor freight for $35.99 and after each watering I blow out the hose, it has worked great for me, I now use our regular water spicket and just disconnect the hose after everytime and blow it out, this works well, and it is something anyone can do.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by horseowner40 View Post
                                  Hey, you have the same problem as me, we fill up 5 gallon buckets we used a cart or snowmoble to carry Misty her water, but I have come up with a way of doing this without carrying water. We have water in our basement just like you and I have a 100' hose that I now use, I leave my hose outside all year and have it laying flat (always), I water Misty with cold water and bought a electric pancake aircompressor from harbor freight for $35.99 and after each watering I blow out the hose, it has worked great for me, I now use our regular water spicket and just disconnect the hose after everytime and blow it out, this works well, and it is something anyone can do.
                                  Hmm. Didn't think about using an air compressor. That's a lot of hose for someone with asthma to blow out lol (or maybe not... never done it, it just seems like it). I would think the hose would still be hard, huh? I'd have to pull it out of the pasture so don't know if it would harden and then not be able to bend it back!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by dmalbone View Post
                                    Hmm. Didn't think about using an air compressor. That's a lot of hose for someone with asthma to blow out lol (or maybe not... never done it, it just seems like it). I would think the hose would still be hard, huh? I'd have to pull it out of the pasture so don't know if it would harden and then not be able to bend it back!
                                    In this weather in South Dakota I leave the hose, it does get hard, but it will not freeze as long as you blow it out, I just flop it in and flop it out, this works for me and as you know my husband is not much help with this horse. By the way I use the cheapest hose walmart sales.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I think the maximum length for the ThermoHose is 60'. I don't know if you can attach two of them together and use an extension cord for power. I wouldn't want to leave something like that on unless you are home. Can you move the trough closer to the house? It might make sense to add a few sections of fencing so the trough can be closer to the house. Even electric fencing with a solar charger might work.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I'm in the same situation, about 10 ft, maybe a little less. My one and only spigot is on the house, outside, about 3 inches off my patio. So, I need to shovel out to even get to it. I ended up buying a 100 gal rubbermaid tank and running an extension cord along the fence for a tank deicer. I put is about 40 ft away from the barn in the hopes that if I ever have an issue with the heater it is far enough away not to catch my barn on fire. I don't like tank heaters and it's not a pretty set-up but I am able to generally pick my day when the tank gets filled to coincide with a day when it is at least 30 degrees so that the hose doesn't freeze before I have a chance to drain it. Thankfully my filly isn't a hay dunker, the water stays decent this time of year.

                                        I had a 150 gallon tank as well so for a while I was able ti fill 250 gallons at once. The tank developed a leak resulting in the tank heater sitting on the bottom of the tank long enough to melt a hole in the bottom. I'm lucky the tank didn't catch on fire and now make sure to use the heaters with the safety cage on them.

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