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Fencing- how easy/hard is it to....

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  • Fencing- how easy/hard is it to....

    swap out existing fencing and put in new??

    Curious as one of our clients is farm shopping and a property he looked at today which he liked had post and wire fencing...which we all find unsuitable. Another property is three rail, but whoever put it in put ALL the rails on the outside. Client has some big guys that lean, and we can see this being a PITA.
    Amanda

  • #2
    We had the same problem with boards on the outside on a property we leased years ago. A solar charger and hot wire arond the top of all the fence lines solved the problem.

    Comment


    • #3
      If the post and wire fencing has good posts, it should pretty easy to take off the wire and replace it. If good posts you could go with three rail or better yet (in my opinion) is horseguard., pretty reasonable cost, looks nice and easy to install, not to mention very safe fencing and they WON'T lean on it since it is electrci
      www.shawneeacres.net

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by shawneeAcres View Post
        If the post and wire fencing has good posts, it should pretty easy to take off the wire and replace it. If good posts you could go with three rail or better yet (in my opinion) is horseguard., pretty reasonable cost, looks nice and easy to install, not to mention very safe fencing and they WON'T lean on it since it is electrci
        This is pretty much what I thought. We're a long way out from having to plan ANY of this, but since we're not going to be building from scratch, we're already trying to prepare all parties involved with the projects that will come with taking over an existing facility and having it the way everyone wants it.

        Since we won't be leasing, I think we rather solve the problem for real (like turning all the rails around). And, unfortunately, one of the bad boys in question is already proving to not give a flying fig about any type of electric fencing!! His pasture currently is strung up with hot wire to keep him from going over...I have caught him more than once just bulling his way through it.
        Amanda

        Comment


        • #5
          For the 3 rail fencing with the rails on the outside, just nail a board over it on the outside of the post. That will help reinforce it and prevent the boards from popping out. To be on the safe side also do a strand or 2 of electric. That would probably be less expensive than tearing down the post and wire and I'm presuming you're talking about something like the no climb wire as opposed to just several strands of wire.

          One town that I lived in had zoning requirements that if you did the 3 rail fencing the rails had to be on the outside. Made the horse owners furious.
          Sue

          I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            The post and wire is not no climb (if it was, we'd be all about it). It is similar to this stuff- http://www.kencove.com/fence/Coated+Wire_detail_WTW.php
            This type of fencing was/is very popular in this area for awhile and is all over the place. We can't think of any story of any horse ever getting hurt on it (it is supposedly very safe), but we are just nervous about it. Again, we aren't sure if this is the property (the place with the backwards 3 rail is out of the running now). But there's a lot we like about it.

            One other problem is that the distance between posts is 12'. Can no climb be set at 12'?
            Amanda

            Comment


            • #7
              A topic near and dear to my summer.

              If the posts are 4x4 or round you could just switch the rails, provided that you can nail back into them once you take them off (some well aged oak is a challenge for a Paseload). If the posts are half-moon shaped, you can't easily rotate them so you are probably stuck with the vertical board on the outside as reinforcement.

              I rented a post hole digger to make new holes to move fence lines. It was not hard per se, but time consuming and required a lot of muscle (we had 3 people on a "1-man" augur).

              ETA--oops I cross posted you on the rail reversal thing

              Comment


              • #8
                If your horse is bulling thru the hot wire, its probably not very hot.

                Even if you move the boards to the inside, I highly recommend a HOT hotwire or strand of Horseguard tape to keep them off.

                We had woven wire with hot wire on top, and we got a big mare who proceeded to paw at the woven wire UNDER the hot wire. Fixed her wagon by taking down the woven wire and replacing with 3 strands of Horseguard. We do have a couple of runs of no-climb but we put Horseguard tape on top and halfway down.

                I have seen her test the fence occasionally - she jumps back from it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by yellowbritches View Post
                  swap out existing fencing and put in new??
                  Not hard, provided the posts were put in well and not rotted.

                  he looked at today which he liked had post and wire fencing...
                  What kind of wire? I used to think all "wire" was evil. Then I discovered how many different kinds there are and how installation differs. Do you mean hi-tensile? Wire but not on high tension? Or another kind? Some wire is coated or electrified for horses and won't do the cheese-grater snap if broken.


                  Another property is three rail, but whoever put it in put ALL the rails on the outside. Client has some big guys that lean, and we can see this being a PITA.
                  That's the easy fix. Hotwire : a wire or fencetape will keep them off of it.

                  If the rail is in good shape, if they got ambitious, it could be pulled off and reattached to inside. I might buy the property and see how it goes before being sure it had to be reattached.

                  I'd worry more about location, price, acreage size, flood zone status, restrictions, lumber/water rights, etc than I'd worry about what side boards are nailed on. That's such an easy fix in the bigger scheme of things.

                  Now if we could just come up with a fix for "ignorant & rude next-door neighbor family".
                  Veterinarians for Equine Welfare

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I personally would first try out this: put a top board flat-wise across the top of the posts, which would give a lip or edge against which they would lean, but not be able to weaken, and which would keep the "lean" away from the lower fence material. This board can be a bit heavy and solid, and hot wire can keep them from chewing it.

                    Also, I agree with the posters who believe that your hot wire is weak. You can up the shock so that it works. You may also need to use a bigger, higher capacity wire, and a bigger, higher output charger, but you can do it.
                    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've had my horses on the coated wire (different brand) since 1996, two different places without a problem. Two are big thoroughbreds.

                      If you have a pusher horse, perhaps a top rail of the flexible type rails would
                      be an option. All their pushing power would be through their chest which would be about where the top rail sits. Centaur has one with an electrified edge.

                      If the coated wire was installed properly (meaning good bracing in the corners
                      and ends, it would be very easy to install a top rail.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If the posts are too far apart, you can add one between existing posts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ditto everyone else really. We bought our first horse property last Feb and it's STILL not a "horse property" lol. I would have given anything to have ANY type of fence to work with. Ok, maybe not... it would have been more work to tear out old rotted posts or rusted t-posts. I'll say I would have given a ton just to have had quality wood posts existing, regardless of what was on them. It has been such a pain so far. With the 3 board, just put a vertical board on the outside of the rails where they are nailed to the fence like this http://www.northcarolinahorsefences....4railsmall.jpg

                          If he's bullying through a hotwire, it most likely is not hot enough, not grounded properly, weak charger, or is placed too high, low, etc.

                          A wire fence can come down. IMO the posts are the hardest and most expensive part about a fence.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by msj View Post
                            For the 3 rail fencing with the rails on the outside, just nail a board over it on the outside of the post. That will help reinforce it and prevent the boards from popping out. To be on the safe side also do a strand or 2 of electric. That would probably be less expensive than tearing down the post and wire and I'm presuming you're talking about something like the no climb wire as opposed to just several strands of wire.

                            One town that I lived in had zoning requirements that if you did the 3 rail fencing the rails had to be on the outside. Made the horse owners furious.
                            Not in my experience. We ended up having to screw the faceboards and rails in with extra long deck screws. Otherwise, they just pop off.

                            The idiot that built our place put all the boards on the outside on the road. Great place to have the boards popping off. Have 1500 feet of road frontage...fun, fun, fun. We're adding electric along the top. That does slow them down.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              And if you're installing electric make sure you ground it properly. The grounding is one of the most important parts to making sure you have a good shock going.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by BasqueMom View Post
                                I've had my horses on the coated wire (different brand) since 1996, two different places without a problem. Two are big thoroughbreds.

                                If you have a pusher horse, perhaps a top rail of the flexible type rails would
                                be an option. All their pushing power would be through their chest which would be about where the top rail sits. Centaur has one with an electrified edge.

                                If the coated wire was installed properly (meaning good bracing in the corners
                                and ends, it would be very easy to install a top rail.
                                This is generally what we hear about this stuff. It is very popular in this area and we've never heard a bad thing about it (in fact, I talked to a friend last night who said she had the same feeling about it that I do, but had a horse in it before, and never had an issue). I think it is more of a "that's not what we're used to" type of thing...we all know horsemen's ideas and opinions are HARD to change! We're going to go look at this property today. I'd like to get a really good look at the fencing.

                                As for our current electric fencing, everyone is right, it probably IS too weak, but it was a quick, inexpensive fix (it does slow the bulldozer down a bit...he's not pushing through fence rails on a daily basis anymore!).
                                Amanda

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  No comment on switching or getting rid of old fencing, but we're in the process of fencing in three large fields on my parents' new farm.

                                  It's hard

                                  Seriously, we spend every weekend doing fencing and feel like we've barely made any progress. We're using an auger and it still takes f.o.r.e.v.e.r!

                                  So, enough bitching, but if you can make-do with at least the posts, I recommend keeping them...

                                  We're doing four strands of the flex-fence and are really excited about it. We've only heard good things from those that have it. Not sure where you're located but you're welcome to come out

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    As others have said, if the posts are solid, there are lots of ways to reuse them. Although at 12' you may have trouble trying to do boards unless you drop new posts in between. Our non-climb posts are spaced at 9', I believe. I'm sure it's *possible* to string it with 12' posts but it might not be as tight or as strong. Rather than trying to do this myself, I'd ask a professional fence installer; they may have better tools to stretch it tighter and make it work.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      On my last farm, the previous owner had lined the riding ring with windowpane wire fence. It was an accident waiting to happen but it was actually stuck in the ground in many places where the fence had worked its way into the sand/clay footing.
                                      It would have taken us ages to remove it so we chained it to the welded in rings in the bed of our F150 and hauled it out. We did just a few sections at a time and it worked like a charm. Good luck with your fence.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        The problem I have had with the coated wire is that - cattle push right through it, and horses - if they get tangled - stay tangled. It stretches and does not break, so they get more and more tangled and then have to stand there all day. for this reason, I have electricity up on the places I have it. I have a lot of smooth wire pastures, this works better because it snaps much easier - but the horses don't respect it much, so the worst fence injuries I have had are from smooth wire. Lastly, I have barbed wire for most of my cattle pasture - and the horses go in there occaisionally - honestly, everyone hates barbed wire, but if it is maintained (ie: tight and not broken), it works well. I have had the least injuries with it. in my experience, any type of fencing at a farm requires a fair amount of maintenance, and is fairly expensive. Electricity on areas where the livestock tend to beat up the fence, has worked very well.

                                        Jill

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