• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Coyotes??

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Coyotes??

    I definitely have coyotes here. I haven't seen them, but some friends and the guys who work here have all seen several and they are reported to be BIG. Like the size of my German Shepherd Dogs, some of them. I never worried about it or paid attention, but two cats have disappeared and I think the fox is too small to get them.

    I hear the coyotes most nights now, and it is creepy. There are a lot of them, and they sound close. I have big dogs, and they are fenced so I don't worry about that, but what kind of problems can they cause. Everyone here says I need to "get rid of them".

    Thoughts, anecdotes, stories, suggestions?
    Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved. - William Jennings Bryan

    http://www.halcyon-hill.com

  • #2
    We've had coyotes. There really isn't much need to "get rid of them". At our old place we did shoot a couple of times, but they were very bold and coming within about 50 ft of the barn. We had calves and/or foals at the time and I was concerned for their safety. One shot and they didn't come close again for about a year- DH used birdshot that wouldn't kill, but might sting a little from the distance he shot from. I have a Pyr now, and the coyotes generally stay clear. Still every now and then I'll see one cross the far back pasture or hayfield- the horses barely acknowledge their presence. I never have foals back there (crappy fence), so I just live and let live.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't think you have to worrry about your horses or dogs.

      Even GSD-sized coyotes are not big enough to harm a horse - they are much lighter-boned than a domesticated dog.

      We have coyotes here, I've heard & seen them on occasion.
      I can always tell when they're in the fields behind my pastures as the horses go on Red Alert - all perked ears & heads up.

      There must be plenty game for the coyotes here as nothing has even tried to get into my chicken coop {knock wood}
      *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
      Steppin' Out 1988-2004
      Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
      Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

      Comment


      • #4
        A few days ago 2 coyotes attacked & killed a women a few hours away from my place. They are big, and not as shy as they were a few years ago.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kitsunegari View Post
          A few days ago 2 coyotes attacked & killed a women a few hours away from my place. They are big, and not as shy as they were a few years ago.
          This seems ridiculous...do you have a news article or something?


          Coyotes are curious, but they're not going to be aggressive to you or the horses, so don't worry about "taking care of them" for those reasons. What you do need to watch out for are your cats/small dogs/sheep/goats/and any fowl you might have wandering around...but just use common sense about that. Lock the barn cats up at night/make sure they're indoor cats, make sure everyone is inside at dusk, etc. It's really not a big deal.

          Coyotes are welcome on my property...they love catching the ground hogs that leave giant holes in my pasture. Their howling is eerie, but I've gotten used to it to the point where I can identify the different members.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by GoForAGallop View Post
            This seems ridiculous...do you have a news article or something?


            Coyotes are curious, but they're not going to be aggressive to you or the horses, so don't worry about "taking care of them" for those reasons. What you do need to watch out for are your cats/small dogs/sheep/goats/and any fowl you might have wandering around...but just use common sense about that. Lock the barn cats up at night/make sure they're indoor cats, make sure everyone is inside at dusk, etc. It's really not a big deal.

            Coyotes are welcome on my property...they love catching the ground hogs that leave giant holes in my pasture. Their howling is eerie, but I've gotten used to it to the point where I can identify the different members.
            Uh no, she's not exaggerating, this was on our news website here in NC because the 19 year old woman who was killed was an up and coming Canadian singer. Name was Taylor Mitchell

            http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/yo...coyotes-canada

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dalpal View Post
              Uh no, she's not exaggerating, this was on our news website here in NC because the 19 year old woman who was killed was an up and coming Canadian singer. Name was Taylor Mitchell

              http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/yo...coyotes-canada
              Okay, thank you, I was just disbelieving because that is not common coyote behavior...as is stated right in the article.

              Comment


              • #8
                Not because it is ridiculous, but I'd love a link to a news story as well. I've heard of coyotes attacking adults, but have never ever been able to find proof via a news story, so I'd love one here.

                I second what everyone else says -- the horses will be fine. We also have big coyotes here -- German Shepherd size -- and have not had a problem at all with the horses or dogs, or my kids for that matter.

                I had one watching me from the edge of the woods once (20 feet away) when I was walking on our farm. I was facing in the opposite direction, and as soon as I turned (& saw coyote) he took off like a flash. I roared and growled my fiercest growl . . . as the Dept. of Envir. Conservation here says, "don't act like prey". I'm not sure how this tone is coming off, so I want to be clear that I never for a second felt in any danger. But thought I'd speak the coyotes language and tell him it wasn't a good idea to be near me.
                https://www.facebook.com/SugarMapleFarm
                Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/peonyvodka/
                www.PeonyVodka.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  We have lots of coyotes around - there is a den on my neighbors property. We hear them frequently, but rarely see them. No problems - and we have foals (and poultry).
                  Liz
                  Ainninn House Stud
                  Irish Draughts and Connemaras
                  Co. Westmeath, Ireland

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It is true, Here are 2 links to two different news agencies of the account.

                    http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...028?hub=Canada

                    http://www.nationalpost.com/rss/story.html?id=2154123

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Coyotes are very common out here in SoCal, despite us not having a lot of acreage per person. They trot down the middle of a residential street, dart through the horses' pens at a boarding barn. We ride within 30 feet of them, hear them yipping at night. They've been in my backyard and I can walk to a Starbucks!

                      They DO take cats and small dogs -- quickly. I wouldn't trust them around 20lb animals, but otherwise keep to themselves, and take care of rats and moles and rabbits.

                      I saw the Canadian story yesterday and its the first I have ever heard of a human attack.

                      jan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Before coyotes split in late spring, they roam in rather lager groups and they can bring foals, yearlings and sick and old horses down.

                        My neighbor several years ago was checking his calving cows one evening, that he had penned in a trap by the house and came to a circle of coyotes, laying around a cow having a calf, 11 or 12 of them.
                        He got two before the rest were too far away to shoot.
                        She was down in labor and they had already eaten on the calf, that was half out and now dead and on her back parts, so he had to shoot her.

                        That is rather common, that is why calving cows are kept close and checked often.

                        Coyotes are not aggressive to larger animals, they mostly live off insects, rodents, rabbits and such, but they are oportunists and will sure chase and bring down anything else.

                        One new neighbor got several dogs, before he decided to kept them penned, because one coyote would lure the dog to chase it and, once a ways from the house, several more jumped up and all killed the dog, even his two great pyrinees were killed like that.

                        We never leave a sick calf in a pen alone, we leave some for company, or coyotes will jump in the pen and eat on it and we find the calf dead next morning, or some times still alive.

                        Coyotes are the ultimate opportunist and will bring down anything that doesn't put a good fight, although they generally don't bother.

                        We can tell when coyotes become thick because the rabbits thin out.
                        Then the coyote population crashes and for a few years we are overrun with rabbits.

                        If you shoot a resident coyote, you alter the territory and others will try to come in to claim it, so it is better to leave an established small group there, better than having roaming coyotes around, that may want to test if horses or pets are easy prey and have not learned to leave your house, barn and pens alone.

                        We shoot at coyotes that come by the house, to keep them off, but generally, we leave them alone, unless we go thru a spell of too many of them.

                        We have been in a drought since 1991, we don't have that many rodents, rabbits and other, so even coyotes have not been as thrifty as they used to be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by kitsunegari View Post
                          A few days ago 2 coyotes attacked & killed a women a few hours away from my place. They are big, and not as shy as they were a few years ago.
                          It must have been a mix - I own a coyote. They are shy and quiet never aggressive 19 years now. I found her as an injured pup on the road I did not know what she was until my vet told me. Pne of the best dogs I have ever known

                          From the article "Coyotes are usually fearful of humans and it is extremely rare for them to attack people. The eastern coyote which populates the Cape Bretton Park has interbred with wolves and is larger than its relatives native to western parts of America." Which makes more sense now.
                          "If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Coyotes will go for small kids, though I haven't heard of them bringing down an adult before. As bluey said, they're opportunists who'll take anything that's easy prey. That's why they're more successful than wolves. As a general rule, though, I wouldn't worry about horses unless you have any that are old or very young. Cats, chickens, toddlers, anything small like that.

                            Woodland, you cannot a) call a coyote a dog, it's not or b) compare the behavior of one reared from infancy by humans to those in the wild.
                            Author Page
                            Like Omens In the Night on Facebook
                            Steampunk Sweethearts

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GoForAGallop View Post
                              Okay, thank you, I was just disbelieving because that is not common coyote behavior...as is stated right in the article.
                              In some areas coyote are interbreeding with wolves. I believe there is/was a study done in NY recently that confirmed that (DNA testing). I don't think the red wolf has interbred with coyote (yet) but the timber wolf has.

                              We've had coyote around here for years though they sometimes look as if they've got something else mixed in with 'em.

                              They do attack in packs here, usually to bring down large calves. Bounties don't seem to work - but hunting them with dogs or having Livestock Guardian Dogs does seem to discourage them from occupied areas (people, pets or livestock). Most folks don't bother shooting them unless they are caught stalking or preying on livestock or pets. (where I live) I enjoy listening to them at night and like having predators around as long as they keep to normal prey.

                              I'm very sorry about that young woman and my condolences to her family and friends.
                              Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                              Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                              -Rudyard Kipling

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                We have them in my area. Used to hear them waaayyyy off in the distance but now they are in our back yard. Outdoor cats have been disappearing on a regular basis as are any loose chickens. Some people have brought donkeys in, especially those with goats and cows. My hay guy told me he lost quite a few calves to coyotes until he got the donkey. So far they haven't bothered any of the horses around here.

                                Knew they were around, but saw it for myself when one dashed across the road while I was driving to work at about 6a.m. Made my mouth drop.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  I am more of a live and let live kind of person, but it definitely bothers me if they are coming up to the house and barn. My dogs are all relatively big, but I am sure a pack of coyotes could take one pretty easily if they chose to.
                                  Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved. - William Jennings Bryan

                                  http://www.halcyon-hill.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I've got to stop listening to the news....we have lots of coyotes, never had a problem with them. Then I hear about that poor young woman from Ontario. I wasn't too concerned about H1N1 either, then we hear about the healthy 13 yr old boy also in Ontario that died a day or two after contracting the virus....

                                    sigh......

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by SMF11 View Post
                                      I roared and growled my fiercest growl . . . as the Dept. of Envir. Conservation here says, "don't act like prey". I'm not sure how this tone is coming off, so I want to be clear that I never for a second felt in any danger. But thought I'd speak the coyotes language and tell him it wasn't a good idea to be near me.

                                      I bet that sounded pretty funny!
                                      I had some attack goats right near the house one night. I ran outside yelling at them and they took off. Evidently they understand English (with a little French mixed in!) too!
                                      april
                                      Equine Retirement at
                                      www.StonyRidgeFarm.webs.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by equusus View Post

                                        I bet that sounded pretty funny!
                                        I had some attack goats right near the house one night. I ran outside yelling at them and they took off. Evidently they understand English (with a little French mixed in!) too!
                                        I was reading ahead of your words and understood that you had some attack goats.
                                        Well, we used to have some of those too, especially Billy the goat, that thought he was a guard dog and would rush people, head down, although was never brave enough to butt them.

                                        In coyote territory, people with smaller livestock, goats and sheep, have herders, guard animals and/or confine them.
                                        It just is not right to put your animals at risk, in harm's way, if it is a dog you leave to run "free", free to be run over in the highway, or a sheep unguarded at night.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X